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March 17, 1987 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-17

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U.S. Rep.
calls for
education
aid hike
(Continued from Page 1)
University. Although Dobbins is
involved in several medical
organizations, he said, "I've got a
lot to learn about SACUA."
Faculty governance is strong at
the University, according to present
SACUA chair William Stebbins.
"(The president and the provost)
as former faculty members seem
willing not only to listen to the
faculty viewpoint but to seek it and
to ensure that it plays a significant
part in their decision making,"
Stebbins said in the annual speech
of the assembly's chair.
Stebbins said SACUA will soon
confront Provost Duderstadt's three
initiatives on interdisciplinary
research, the undergraduate program,
and affirmative action. Other
important issues are tenure,
classified research, and the
University's athletic program, he
said.
Also at yesterday's meeting,
U.S. Representative William Ford
(D-Mich.) spoke on federal funding
for higher education. Ford said
nationwide more college-age
students are poor and live in broken
homes than in the past. Financial
aid for these students is just not
available, he said.
Ford said the University is
"getting a bad rap" about its.
minority recruitment and retention
efforts. The principle cause for the
low number of minorities on
campus may be due to the
increasing cost of education, Ford
said. Many students are now opting
to attend a community college for
their first two years to cut down on
costs, he said.
"Not one member of either
political party on (the House
Committee on Education and
Labor) supports the President on
his budget," Ford said. He said the
education budget has eroded since
1981.
"I'd like to see (U.S. Defense
Secretary Caspar) Weinberger run
his shop if they saved the same
-amount on his budget, (as they do
on the education budget)," he said.

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, March 17, 1987 - Page 3
Voters will decide fate
o city hall expansion

By CARRIE LORANGER
City employees' continual
complaints about the lack of office
space in City Hall prompted
"Proposal A" on April's city
election ballot, asking voters if
they want to spend tax dollars on
city hall expansion.
The Ann Arbor City Council
decided on Feb. 9 to let voters
decide on expansion with the ballot
question.
If passed, the $18 million
proposal would impose a .84 mill
tax on all property owners for 15
years. This would mean an extra
$34 per year on the average home
($80,000 value) according to the
city assessor's office.
Assistant City Administrator
Donald Mason said there has been a
space problem for the last five or
six years. City Hall staff members

attribute the problem to an increase
in the number of city employees
over the past 20 years. There are
410 city employees who work in
City Hall, a building originally
designed in 1962 for 270
employees.
The proposed addition, designed
by Osler-Milling architect firm,
would extend to the east of the
existing building and would add
57,100 square feet of six story
office space and four levels of
underground parking.
One group called Stop the
Expansion, Neutralize City Hall
(STENCH) said City Hall does not
need to expand. The group says the
city should , consolidate its
operations instead.
David Raaflaub, spokesperson
for STENCH, said City Hall
expansion will lead to overzealous

enforcement of parking regulations
and other laws. The group is also
opposed to another tax increase.
Raaflaub favors more parking in
that area, and said the city should be
able to build a parking structure
without a whole office building
attached.
Some of the planned improve-
ments will have to be made whether
the voters approve the ballot
proposal or not, Mason said.
The city has other options,
Mason said. The plan may be
revised so it will cost less, for
example.
The city could also lease space
for short-term relief, though this
could hinder the efficiency of inter-
office operations and be more
expensive in the long run.

TV changes views, study

Daily Photo by SCOTT LITUCHY

Waiting is the hardest part
First year nursing student Tricia Laible waits inside the Union with her
two year old son Brian. The two will catch the bus to the Student Parent's
Center where Brian goes for day care.
St. Pat's lore recalled

By JIM BRAY
The more television a person
watches, the more likely they are to
hold progressive attitudes about sex
and race, according to a University
professor's study.
The study, conducted by
Associate Prof. of Communication
Richard Allen, concludes that
despite the perception of television
as "the idiot box", it is actually a
"positive influence" in promoting
liberal views on sexual and racial
equality.
The study was based on a
random telephone survey of 534
individuals in Oakland County, a
predominantly white, suburban area
north of Detroit. The amount of
time, the attention span, and the
frequency of television viewing was
taken into consideration, as well as
the sociological status of the
individuals interviewed.
According to Allen, "The higher
your sociological status, the more
likely you are to have an egalitarian
attitude."
Allen's study is part of a series

of studies called cultivation
analysis, which investigates the
effect media has on cultivating
opinions in society. Allen's results
are unique in this area of study.
Study subjects who watched a
lot of television usually disagreed
with the idea that husbands and
wives should fill traditional roles in
the family.
The study also indicated that
most frequent viewers disagreed
with these statements: "There are
enough women in responsible
positions in government and private
business" and "There are enough
blacks in responsible positions in
government and private business."
Allen attributes the results to
television programmers' attempts
to present accepted views of
society. "Because they abhor
controversy they try to present
normative views," said Allen.
In the future Allen hopes to
reproduce the experiment in other

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parts of the nat
the results wil
found in this a

says
ion. He believes that
1 be similar to those
rea.

(Continued from Page 1)
But St. Paddy's Day in Ireland
isn't the traditional day of drinking
and parading as it is in America. It
was originally a Saint's day, or a
Holy Day of Obligation, like
Christmas.
"Up into the late 1950's, it was
very much a Sunday kind of day, a
church-going kind of day," Mc -
Namara said. "For real confirmed
drinkers, it wasn't a day they very
much liked, because instead of there
being more drinking in the pubs,
the Sunday license laws were in
effect."
The idea of St. Patrick's day

parades actually emigrated to Ireland
from America.
According to McNamara, "In the
1950s and 60s in Dublin they
began inviting over from America
marching bands to have a St.
Patrick's day parade."
St. Patrick's has lost most of its
function as a cultural glue now,
though. As professor McNamara
says, "Everybody who wants to be
Irish can be Irish on Patrick's day."

Be Our Guest
at The University of Michigan-Dearborn
Students in good academic standing are invited to take
advantage of spring and summer by enrolling in course-
work at our easily accessible campus. We offer
University of Michigan credit through a full array of

THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

Campus Cinema
Riddles Of The Sphinx (Laura
Mulvey & Peter Wollen, 1977),
Eyemediae, 8 p.m., 214 North
Fourth.
FA middle class woman becomes
psychotically obsessed with her baby
daughter.
Speakers
Mark Strand- "Reading From
His Work," Visiting Writers Series,
4 p.m., Rackham West Conference
Room.
Ernst Katz- "Atlantis," The
Rudollf Steiner Institute of the Great
Lakes Area, 8 p.m., 1923 Geddes.
Ted Sylvester, Laurie
Wechter, Bill Zirinsky, and
Sally Horvath- "The Perils of
Alternative Publishing," 7:30 p.m.,
126 East Quad.
Amos Shapira- "Combating
Racism by Law in Israel: The Case
of Meir Kahane," Jewish Law
Students Union, 8 p.m., Law
School.
Meetings
Catherine McAuley Health
Center Volun teers- In-
formatioml Meeting, 7 p.m., St.
Joseph Mercy Hospital Education
Center.
Union of Students for Israel-
7 p.m., Hillel.
Campus Bible Study- 7 p.m.,
Room C, Michigan League(3rd
Floor).
TARDAA(Dr. Who Fan
Club)- "Mind Warp," 8 p.m., 296
Dennison Bldg.
Furthermore
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre-

Students of Objectivism-
Video presentation, "The Raymond
Newman Journal," 8 p.m., Michigan
League, Room D, (663-5589).
American Business Women,
MAIA Chapter- "Sharing,
Growing, and Winning," 5:30 p.m.,
Sheraton University Inn, (665-7106).
Revolutionary History
Series- "China 1949: Maoist
Movement Did Not Lead to
Socialism," 7 p.m., 439 Mason
Hall.
Rugby Football Club- 8 p.m.,
The Coliseum, corner of Hill and
Fifth, (996-4529).
"Breaking Silence: Rape in
Marriage"- Educational Video-
tape, 7 p.m., Ann Arbor Public
Library.
Parent Support Group - 8
p.m., Huron r Oaks Chemical
Dependency Treatment Facility,
5301 E. Huron River Drive, (572-
4302).
Safewalk- Night time safety
walking service, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m.,
102 UGLi or (936-1000).
"Custom-Tailoring your
European Trip"- 3 p.m., 603
East Madison.
Parenting the Difficult Child- 7
p.m., Ann Arbor "Y", (663-0536).
Computing Course- "Intro -
duction to Tell-A-Graf," 7 p.m.,
4003 SEB, (747-2424).
Free Tutoring- All 100-200
level Math, Chemistry, Physics, and
Engineering courses, 7 p.m.-11
p.m., 307 UGLi.

day and evening classes.
Spring/Summer Term
Registration
Term Length
Spring Half-Term
fRegistration
Term Length
Summer Half-Term
Registration
Term Length

April 29-30
May 4-August 31
April 29-30
May 4-June 27
July 1-2
July 7-August 31

See your registrar or call the Office of Admissions at
(313) 593-5100 for a guest application and tuition
information.

Lrnl

The University of Michigan-Dearborn is an affirmative
action/non-discriminatory institution.

4 CAMP TAMARACK
s, CAMP KENNEDY,
CAMP + EEN ADVENTURETR P
AVRE AGE (for the emotnal mo
SILVERMAN O
/-
INTERVIEWING A

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