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March 17, 1987 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-17

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I

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, March 17, 198'

Courses
taught
by local
(Continued from Page 1)
Professor Peter Behers, who is
teaching classes on international
relations law, is replacing a
professor on sabbatical. Behers,
;from the University of Hamburg,
Germany, said he accepted the
University's offer because of its
"good research facilities and
extremely good (law) library."
The College of Pharmacy also
uses both visiting and adjunct
professors, according to Dean Ara,
Paul. John Topliss is an adjunct
professor from Ann Arbor's Warner
Lambert Park Davis Pharmaceutical
Division.
Topliss has lectured on drug
design for three years. He feels his
lectures "create a bridge from what
is taught in the classroom to how it
all relates to practical applications."
Most visiting professors work in
the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts. Chris Miller, an
associate professor of English from
Pomona College in California, is
one of LSA's 28 visiting professors
this term. Miller will stay at the
University one semester teaching
both an undergraduate and graduate
course.
Often visiting professors are
hired to cover temporary openings,
said Jack Walker, LSA associate
dean for academic affairs. Visiting
professors are occasionally offered a
full-time position at the University,
but this applies to only two or
three professor a year, Walker said.
Salaries are comparable to those at
home-schools.
But the visiting professor
program is not without difficulties,
Walker said. If students have
incomplete papers or miss a final,
it can become a big hassle when the
professors return to their
universities because students must
clear up problems long distance, he
explained.

Associated Press
B eara troopers
A platoon of "Bearatroopers" prepares for maneuvers in toy stores
throughout the United State and Canada. The Bearatroopers come ready
to jump out of bearaplanes with their own "bearachute." Militarism has
never been this cute.
Studets say late
nightshepgrades

(Continued from Page 1)
stimulates the central nervous
system, allows thoughts to flow
more easily and readily, and
decreases fatigue and drowsiness.
In large doses, however,
"caffeine can cause insomnia, irrita-
bility, nervousness, tremors, extra
heartbeats and headaches," according
to a University Health Service
pamphlet.
To make up for the lack of sleep
that most students experience after
staying up late studying, some
students resort to naps. Many take a
nap as a daily habit.

LSA sophomore Neil Bernstein
said naps are "the greatest invention
ever made."
Others nap in class, especially
large lectures. Still others choose to
simply sleep straight through their
classes, because "sleeping during
class is like not going - little
registers one way or the other,"
according to Lisa Pera an LSA
freshman.
Most students think they will
still do adequately in the classes
they sleep through. "It balances
out," said one LSA senior. "If you
stay up all night for a class, and
then sleep through it the next day,
then you're forced to make it up by
staying up again another night."
Only upcoming finals will tell if
the early to bed and rise theory or
the all-nighter one will win out.

Students
compete
without
party spot
By PAMELA FRANKLIN
Independent candidates in today's
MSA election may have a tough
time becoming known without help
from a party to publicize their
names.
Some independents running
opposed in this year's MSA
election say the lack of party
publicity will not affect their
campaign. First-year law student
Glen Smith said he is not worried
about running independently
because, "students do not vote
straight ticket for MSA elections,
they vote for who they know."
Smith is running independently
because he would like MSA to
refund Law School students' MSA
fee, by having MSA adopt the
funding of the free services the Law
School provides such as
unemployment benefits and family
law clinic.
MOST independents decided to
run independently because they did
not support the platform of any of
the parties. However, some do not
have new ideas for MSA, and have
only their ability to be an effective
worker and representative of their
school to offer MSA.
LSA junior Michael Sherman he
does not want to be restricted to
adhering to a party's platform when
he may not fully agree with it.
Engineering sophomore Aldas
Kriauciunas said, "Parties are all the
same, I want to be different."
Bill Ammerman, a sophomore
candidate for LSA, said none of the
parties impresssed him enough for
him to show his undivided support
by running on their ticket.
"A PARTY cannot make a
person a good representative," said
Ammerman who is running on the
confidence that voters will know
that he is "aware of the issues,
speaks intelligently, hard working,
reasonable, responsible, and capable
of representing the average student
of the school of LSA."
Steve Cintron, a sophomore
running for Engineering rep., says
that he is running, independently
because he supports stroger action
on minority recruitment and
retention than parties are proposing,
and as a minority student he is
committed to make these changes.
THE ISSUES which the
independent candidates are most
concerned with are racism and
refocusing MSA on campus issues.
There are also independent
candidates who view MSA with
less commitment. Paul Kominsky,
a freshmen engineering candidate,
said he does not know the issues,
has never attended an MSA
meeting.
The Daily did not contact
second-year law student Karen
Taylor who is also running
independently, along with LSA
juniors Ken Cohen and Frank
Johnson.

Independents running unopposed
are architecture student Peter Larson
and pharmacy student Timothy
Cunniff.
Law student Joseph Girardot,
said he has dropped out of the
election, but MSA will not take his
name off the ballot.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press reports
Quotas may cost U.S. jobs
WASHINGTON - Limits on Japanese car sales in the United.
States have cost thousands of U.S. jobs and motivated Japanese car -
makers to set up shop on American soil where they can make additional
competitive inroads, a private economist said yesterday.
Clifford Winston, a senior fellow with the Brookings Institution,
said his study documents the counterproductive effects of trade restrict -
ions in the auto industry and should serve as a warning to the Congress
as it considers trade legislation.
Winston concluded that with Japanese car sales in the United States
limited by voluntary quotas, American automakers found they could
safely boost prices and limit production without fear of being undercu1,'
by their main rival.
Study: acid lakes to increase
WASHINGTON - A long-awaited study of acid rain predicts that
about 300 lakes in the northeastern United States will become acidic in
the next 50 years unless the pollutants that cause the problem are
reduced.
The unreleased study by Environmental Protection Agency scientists
predicts that lakes in the Southeast will start becoming acidic in that,
period, but there is what one official called a "nil" chance that lakes in.
the West will be hurt because of low emissions of the pollutants in.
question.
If the study's prediction is borne out, it would mean almost a
doubling of the number of acidic lakes in the Northeast.
The Reagan administration has resisted urgings from environ -
mentalists, Northeastern states, and the Canadian government for furthe.
emissions controls, arguing there is no evidence that any significan
new damage is occurring.
New trade law to be proposed
DETROIT - U.S. Rep. John Dingell said yesterday he's confident
Congress will approve legislation to stop unfair trading practices by
foreign nations, with or without President Reagan's concurrence.
"I think (prospects) are really very good," the Michigan Democrat
said at a news conference before addressing the Economic Club of
Detroit. "We anticipate the president, despite speeches or comments to
the contrary, will either sign it or have his veto overridden."
The proposed law would "level out the playing field" in international
trade by forcing the Japanese and other trading partners to allow U.S.
companies entry into their markets in return for export rights to the
United States, Dingell said.
Panel OKs anti-balding drug
WASHINGTON - A government advisory panel yesterday
recommended approval of the first drug shown to make hair grow on
bald men, but with the provision that doctors be instructed to tell their
patients not to expect miracles.
The panel of outside experts also told the Food and Drug
Administration it expects the agency to closely monitor advertising of
the product to make sure the manufacturer, Upjohn Co., does not over -
state what the hair grower can be expected to do.
C. C. Evans, the physician who heads the FDA's dermatology sec -
tions, said he expects the minoxidil drug to be approved in a few
months.
To be effective, the drug must be taken indefinitely. If discontinued,
the hair it has stimulated to grow falls out. Minoxidil has been used in
tablet form for about 20 years as a treatment for high blood pressure,
and the side effect of hair growth was noted in'some patients.
EXTRAS
Eighth annual Slug Fest
introduces wormy cuisine
GUERNEVILLE, Calif (AP) - Participants in the eighth annual:
Slug Fest don't need strong jaws so much as strong stomachs.
The event Sunday included slug-eating contests, slug races and the;
sampling of gourmet dishes prepared with the slimy creature, including
Szechwan Slug and Strawberry Almond Slug Shortcake.
To wash it all down, there were vodka martinis with a twist of slug.
Sebastopol Councilwoman Anne Magnie drew loud chants of "Eat It!"
when she hesitated on the "Slug-ka-bob," skewered slug with bits of fruit
and vegetables.
Municipal Court Judge Mark Tansil allowed that he actually likes
slugs. "I'm into cruel and unusual punishment," he said.

Michaelsen, one of the judges for the festival at the Guernewood;
Lodge, said that no matter wat cooks do to them, slugs "are slimy
creatures and they feel that way going down your throat."
If you see news happen, call 76-DAILY.
STiq 3itrltgan uil
Vol. XCVII --No.113
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April-$18 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One
term-$10 in town; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and sub -
scribes to Pacific News Service and the Los Angeles Times Syndicate.

MONO

FooD BUYS

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WHITE
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FRESH CHICKEN SALE
whole breasts s1 .49 lb.

whole legs $
609 E. William
663-4253

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Hours: M-F 8-7
Sat. 8-6

Vote in the MSA Elections!
March 17 & 18

1 C4*4p

!::k

Vote for:
President/ Vice President
Representatives in:
Referenda Questions

with purchase
of
Shamrock
cookies
or

o*74

"

Campus-Wide
LSA
Rackham
Engineering
Business
Medicine
Art
A-MSA Fee
B-Pirgim
Refundable fee
C-Pirgim
Positive Check-
off
TUESDAY

Architecture
Law
Natural Res.
Nursing
Pharmacy
D-School &
College Gov't
fee
E-Right to vote
on Code
WEDNESDAY

Editor in Chief................................ROB EARLE
Managing Editor..........................AMY MINDELL
News Editor.............:................PHILIP I. LEVY
Features Editor..........................MELISSA BIRKS
NEWS STAFF: Elizabeth Atkins, Eve Becker, Steve
Blonder, Rebecca Blumenstein, Jim Bray, Brian Bonet,
Scott Bowles, Paul Henry Cho, Dov Cohen, Rebecca
Cox, Hampton Dellinger, Leslie Eringaard, Martin
Frank, Pam Franklin, Stephen Gregory, Edward
Kleine, Steve Knopper, Vibeke Laroi, Carrie Loranger,
Michael Lustig, Jerry Markon, Edwin McKean, Andy
Mills, Tim Omarzu, Eugene Pak, Melissa Ramsdell,
Martha Sevetson, Wendy Sharp, Louis Stancato,
Steven Tuch, David Webster, Jennifer Weiss, Rose
Mary Wummel
Opinion Page Editors..................PETER MOONEY
HENRY PARK
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Muzammil Ahmed, Tim
Bennett, Peter Ephross, Paul Honsinger, Tim fleet,
Lisa Jordan, Jeffrey Rutherford, Caleb Southworth,
Arlin Wasserman, Mark Williams.
Arts Editors..........................REBECCA CHUNG
SETH FLICKER
Books.......................SUZANNE MISENCIK
Features.................................ALAN PAUL
Film..................................KURT SERBUS
Music.................................BETH FERTIG
Theatre......................LAUREN SCHREIBER
ARTS cTAF-. L -a .m -i a ..

Sports Editor.........................SCOTT G. MILLER
Associate Sports Editors...............DARREN JASEY
RICK KAPLAN
GREG MOLZON
ADAM OCI[LIS
JEFF RUSH
SPORTS STAFF: Jim Downey, Liam Flaherty, Allen
Gelderloos, Kenneth Goldberg, Chris Gordillo, Shelly
Haselhuln, Julie Hollman, Walter Kopf, Rob Levine,
Jill Marchiano, Ian Ratner, Adam Schefter, Adam
Schrager, Scott Shaffer, Pete Steinert, Douglas Volan,
Peter Zellen, Bill Zolla.
Photo Editors...........................SCOTT LITUCHY
ANDI SCHREIBER
PHOTO STAFF: Leslie Boorstei, Karen Handelman,
Dana Mendelssohn, John Munson, Darrian Smith,
Grace Tsai.
Business Manager................ MASON FRANKLIN
Sales Manager.............................DIANE BLOOM
Finance Manager... REBECCA LAWRENCE
Classified Manager .............GAYLE SHAPIRO
Assistant Sales Manager..................ANNE KUBEK
Assistant Classified Manager................AMY EIGES
-DISPLAY SALES: Karen Brown, Kelly Crivello, Irit
Elrad, Missy Hambrick, Ginger Heyman, Denise Levy,
Wendy Lewis, Jason Liss, Jodi Manchik, Laura
Martin, Mindy Mendonsa, Scott Metcalf, Carolyn

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