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March 04, 1987 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-04

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, March 4, 1987
Michigan students favor sex ed

Lansing(AP)-- Michigan high
school students give their schools
pretty good .marks but say their
curriculum needs changing,
according to a survey released
yesterday by the State Board of
Education.
The students favor sex education
and support school-based health
clinics, said the survey of 5,146
10th- and 12th-graders conducted in
November by the board's Project
Outreach.
And despite the news reports of
school violence in some cities,
most students don't see discipline

as a major problem in their school.
But they worry about peer pressure,
drug abuse, getting good grades and
"just staying in school."
Student responses were less
enthusiastic than answers given to
similar questions last year by
Michigan adults, said Ned Hubbell.
Project Outreach director.
And the state board president
promised officials will pay
attention to the survey.
"It's really telling us what
students believe," said Barbara
Mason of Lansing. "When the
State Board establishes its policies,

procedures and goals, we take it
into account."
The written survey, which
carries an error rate of 3 percent,
included requests by students for a
greater variety of classes, better
college preparation, more computer
instruction, upgraded textbooks and
sex education.
Eighty-seven percent said high
schools should include sex
education in classes, while 77
percent said sex education should be
provided in junior high. But they
split evenly on whether sex
education should be provided in

elementary school.
While students overwhelmingly
supported school-based health
clinics, only 49 percent said they
should dispense contraceptive
devices.
Asked to list the biggest
problems facing high school
students, 52 percent mentioned peer
pressure, or the need to "belong."
Their second concern was drug
abuse, at 40 percent.
"We did take some heart in that
the majority (of students) didn't
think discipline was a problem."
Hubbell said.

Travel interests LSv

(Continued from Page 1)
history of art. In 1978, she finished
studying for a master's degree.
Later, she began working on her
Ph.D.
"After a number of years, they
gave me a little longer lunch hour,"
she said, laughing. Her Ph.D.
degree is not yet completed.
DURING her early days at the
budget office, Copeland was the
only wage earner in her household
while her husband pursued his
music degree. She supported two
young children on $4800 a year.
William now works as a music
teacher in the Ann Arbor public
schools.
"It wasn't the ideal way to spend
lunch hour, but it served as a great
motivator. When you're an older
student, you realize the work ethic
that you need to make ends meet."
Her hard work has allowed many
traveling excursions. Copeland's
eyes brighten when she recalls the

experiences. She leans forward in
her chair, her desk blanketed in
budget reports, notebooks, napkins
and an empty Diet-7UP can.
Vestiges of her experiences in
exotic places, such as statues and
paintings, decorate Copeland's
office. Studying art, especially in
ancient lands such as India, is her
main inspiration for travel.
But her favorite travel spot is her
residence in Pinckney, "when I can
get home and rest."
As a first year graduate student
in the late 1970s, Copeland did a
paper on Oriental Art, and decided
to research Tanka, which is
Tibetan cloth painting. She met a
man who collected the relics, and
became fascinated with the subject
as well as the man, who is now 92
years old. His name is Walter
Koelz, and the two of them often
meet and discuss art. After she
retires, she plans to write a
biography of him.

A budget d
Originally, Copeland wanted to
take at least one trip per year. But
with both of her children in college
- one at Art Center College of
Design in Pasadena, Calif. and the
other studying at the University -
she realizes that such excursions
will have to be postponed.
After working for 20 years with
the University budget, Copeland
knows the value of the dollar and
her spending limitations.
BUT Copeland's current career
keeps her in Michigan, mani -
pulating the $64 million budget of
the University's largest college.
She enjoys her job because she
likes to be at the "center of
everything."
"LSA has the largest portion of
students and it's exciting. If I could
do a good job, I should be where it
counts the most," she said.
LSA Dean Peter Steiner, the
fifth dean Copeland has served, is
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pleased with her work. He promoted
Copeland to her present position
five years ago.
"She is the one indispensible
person in LSA. She is the
institutional memory of the college
and she works very hard," Steiner
said.
The four other associate deans in
LSA serve three year terms, but
Copeland's is indefinite. The
incoming deans need someone in
her position to inform them how to
allocate their funds in their area.
Each associate dean submits a
report to Copeland every month on
their budget. Copeland then keeps
track of what has been spent and
how much still needs to be spent.
Copeland spends the majority of
her time making budgetary
allotments for faculty and teaching
assistants.
Her responsibility to the faculty
entails cataloging who will be
leaving, who will be coming back,
and who will be on sabbatical.
Since most of the faculty is
tenured, she decides how much
money should be spent on visiting
professors or replacements, and she
makes her recommendations to the
Executive Committee, who will
then decide on a replacement.
After she retires, Copeland, 55,
plans on doing more traveling to
places that she has never been to,
such as Africa, Scandinavia and the
Pacific Northwest. "I've been to
about 47 states in this country, but
never to Washington or Oregon,"
she added.
FBI director
tapped to
replace Casey
(Continued from Page 1)
The nomination of Webster, on
the other hand, received quick praise
from Senate Democratic Leader
Robert Byrd of West Virginia, who
called him "a highly regarded
professional who will bring much-
needed credibility to the CIA."
Reagan, in a statement released
at the White House, said, "Bill
Webster will bring, remarkable
depth and breadth of experience, as
well as an outstanding record of
achievement, to this position."
Justice Department sources said
a debate was still under way over
who would be nominated to take
over the FBI.
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IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press reports
High court moves to protect
victims of contagious diseases
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court, in a ruling likely to help
AIDS victims fight discrimination, said yesterday people with
contagious diseases are protected by a federal law helping the
handicapped.
The court, by a 7-2 vote, said businesses and government entities
receiving federal aid are barred from discriminating-in employment or
otherwise-against people with contagious diseases.
Rejecting Reagan administration arguments, the court said
employers may be violating a 1973 federal law if they fire employees
based solely on a fear that those employees may spread a disease.
Riots erupt in South Korea
SEOUL, South Korea - Demonstrators fought for hours against
nearly 50,000 riot police in hit-and-run clashes, yesterday, on the streets
of Seoul during a day of remembrance for a student who died during
police torture.
Violent confrontations also were reported in six other cities. Police
said 20 people were hurt in all, two seriously, and 395 were detained.
At least four opposition lawmakers were injured, one seriously, in
leading protesters against police, who fired tear gas and used shields and
truncheons to fend off demonstrators.
Tuesday's "Grand Peace Marches for Anti-Torture and
Democratization" were called by the main opposition New Korea
Democratic Party and 47 dissident and church groups to mark the 49th
day after the death of Park Chong-chul.
New arms proposals expected
GENEVA - U.S. and Soviet teams continued talks on medium-
range nuclear missiles and President Reagan said the Americans would
present new proposals today, when this round of talks originally had
been scheduled to end.
Maynard Glitman and Lem Masterkov led the U.S. and Soviet
negotiators in yesterday's meeting. Soviet spokesman Alexander
Monakhov said they talked for about 90 minutes at the Soviet Missiofi,
but he gave no details.
During an appearance in the White House briefing room in
Washington, Reagan said: "I welcome the statement by Soviet
Secretary General Gorbachev on Saturday on reduction in INF
(Intermediate Nuclear Force) to agreements in other negotiations."
Gorbachev proposed the superpowers reach an agreement apart from
other arms negotiations on eliminating medium-range missiles from
Europe in five years.
Israeli indicted in spy casev
WASHINGTON - A federal grand jury yesterday indicted Israeli
Air Force officer Aviem Sella on charges he conspired with convicted-
spy Jonathan Pollard to gather top-secret U.S. military intelligence.
The three-count espionage indictment accuses Sella of recruiting
Pollard, then a Navy civilian intelligence analyst, to gather military,
secrets helpful to Israel.
Sella, now a commander of an Israeli Air Force Base, was charge.
with conspiracy to commit, gather, or deliver national defense
information, gathering such secrets, and receiving or obtaining
classified information as a foreign agent.
Sella may never have to stand trial for the charges because the U.S.-
Israeli extradition treaty exempts espionage. However, he would face
arrest if he were to travel to the United States.
The charges carry a maximum sentence of life imprisonment.
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Tornado strikes nowhere
CHICAGO - A National Weather Service bulletin that erroneously
said the city of Rockford had been demolished by a tornado was sent to
hundreds of Midwest radio and television stations Monday and read on
the air by some announcers.
One broadcaster whose station used the bulletin said "that's very
upsetting to find out you may have panicked thousands of people
needlessly."
The bulletin, sent on the weather service's wire at 4:55 a.m. Monday
said: "At 4:35 a.m. CST a tornado hit the Rockford, Ill. weather office.
This storm was moving southeast at 50 mph. This is a dangerous
storm. Take cover immediately.
"The entire town of Rockford has been demolished. If you are in the
path of this tornado, you should go to a basement shelter if available.
Abandon cars and mobile homes."
Five minutes later, a disclaimer was sent explaining that the bulletin
was transmitted by mistake, said meterologist Steve Kahn at the
service's Chicago office.
The bulletin was part of a test being conducted to prepare for the
upcoming tornado season, and was designed only for weather service
personnel, Kahn said.
If you see news happen, call 76-DAILY.

i

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(We close a little earlier on Sundays)

Vol. XCVII -- No. 104
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
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through April-$18 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One
term-$10 in town; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and sub
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The LSA Student Gov't. is looking for any
and all individuals who feel they are tal-
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a little effort to change the few disagree-
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their stay at the U of M a lot more fun than
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Editor in Chief ...............ROB EARLE
Managing Editor ..................AMY MINDELL
News Editor ...............PHILIP I. LEVY
Features Editor...................MELISSA BIRKS
NEWS STAFF: Elizabeth Atkins, Eve Becker, Steve
Blonder, Rebecca Blunenstein, Jim Bray, Brian Bonet,
Scott Bowles, Paul Henry Cho, Dov Cohen, Rebecca
Cox, Hampton Dellinger, Leslie Eringaard, Martin
Frank, Pam Franklin, Stephen Gregory, Edward
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Mary Wunnnel
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HENRY PARK
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Bennett, Peter Ephross, Paul Honsinger, Tim Huet,
Lisa Jordan, Jeffrey Rutherford, Caleb Southworth,
Arlin Wasserman, Mark Williams.
Arts Editors.........................REBECCA CHUNG
SETH FLICKER
Books.......................SUZANNE MISENCIK
Features .................ALAN PAUL
Film ..................KURT SHERBUS
Music .........................BETH FERTIG
Theatre................LAUREN SCHREIBER

Sports Editor ............SCOTT G. MILLER
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RICK KAPLAN
GREG MOLZON
ADAM OCHLIS
JEFF RUSH
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Peter Zellen, Bill Zolla.
Photo Editors.....:.....................SCOTT LITUCHY'
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PHOTO STAFF: Leslie Boxsteim, Karen Handelman,
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Business Manager..................MASON FRANKLIN
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