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January 30, 1987 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Engin.
Council
opposes
FIRGIM
By MICHAEL LUSTIG
The engineering college's
student government voted late
Wednesday night to urge its
Michigan Student Assembly
representatives to oppose PIRGIM
in' the environmental group's effort
tp collect fees through a negative
clieck-off system.
' " The vote was against the
negative check-off system," but not
against PIRGIM itself, said Beth
Jnes, an Engineering Council vice
iik sident. The council's 44-2 vote
recommended that its MSA
representatives vote against the
negative check-off system when the
assembly votes on PIRGIM's
proposal next Tuesday.
PIRGIM, an acronym for Public
Interest Research Group in
Michigan, used to collect fees
through a voluntary checkoff
system on the Student Verification
Farm, but the University's Board of
Regents cancelled that method of
collecting in February, 1985.
The group began a petition drive
Tact year and gathered about 16,800
signatures to reinstate negative
checkoff system. PIRGIM presented
he petitions to the regents in
Sptember in an effort to get them
to approve the system, but it did
not receive approval.
PIRGIM members were upset
;ind surprised by the Engineering
Council's vote. Wendy Seiden, a
1P, TGIM member, said part of the
problem is that the group was not
ipvited to speak before the Council.
"They should have asked us to
come to their meeting. We would
haye been glad to."
Seiden said she thought someone
from PIRGIM was at the Council's
meeting, but said that she only
found out about the vote second-
hand. She added that she did not
know if PIRGIM was aware of the
council's agenda before its
tmeeting.Y

I

The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 30, 1987 - Page 5
'U' profs. receive
humanity awards

By WENDY SHARP
Three University faculty
members have been awarded
fellowships from the National
Endowment for the Humanities.
Julie Ellison, associate professor
of English, Victor Lieberman,
associate professor of Southeast
Asian history, and Dale Monson,
assistant professor of music, are
among 230 national recipients of
the awards.
Ellison is using her fellowship
to finish writing a book entitled
The Dialogue of Love, Conflict,
Community, and Gender and
Romantic Theories of
Interpretation, about the history of
criticism from 1750 to 1850.
Ellison ha. teen working on the
book since early 1983, and plans to
"finish it in 1987 if it kills ne."
She has taught 19th century
American literature, English
romantic poetry, and critical theory
courses since she came to the
University in 1980.
Lieberman is studying the
economic and political history of

Burma from the 15th to the 19th
century. This summer he will travel
to England to get documentation
and then return to Ann Arbor to
begin writing a book on his
findings.
Lieberman said his research may
be helpful to European historians.
He came to the University in 1984
after teaching in England at the
Hatfield Polytechnic Institute for
eight years. He teaches early and
modern Southeast Asia, and a
course about the Vietnam War.
Monson is writing a book on
the relationship between composers
and singers in the composition of
18th century opera. His research
shows that composers like Mozart
and Handel wrote operas based on
singers' preferences. This summer
Monson will study manuscripts in
various areas of Europe. Monson
has been an instructor here for five
years, teaching courses in 18th
century music history and music
appreciation.

Protest Daily Photo by DARRIAN SMITH
LASC members protested outside the Federal Building on East Liberty. It was their fourth weekly protest
against President Reagan's policies in Central America.

'U Terrce
(Continued from Page 1)
expansion."
THE THREE Terrace
buildings being torn down now
because of the parking shortage on
the Medical Campus. Despite the
construction of two new parking
decks, the parking shortage is
expected to run between 200 and
500 spaces next year. And a deficit
of 955 to 1,268 is forecast for 1994,
according to a planning report. The
construction of the 1,000-space
parking structure in place of the
three Terrace buildings is expected
to remedy the situation.
Alternatives to the Terrace site,
including the Children's Psychiatric
Hospital and the Old Main
Hospital, were examined but
rejected.
Satellite parking, involving
parking off-campus and taking a
shuttle bus to the Medical Campus,
was also rejected. "The Medical
Campus community is not
receptive to the concept of satellite
parking facilities," according to a
planning report:
Despite this, tearing down the
Terrace has sparked anger among its
residents.'" Outrageous' is the right
word for tearing down buildings
while there is such a demand for
housing," said Smith.

razi causes
The current residents of the declini
Terrace will be given preferential Acc
treatment for other University the cii
housing. Comm
"We're not concerned about vacanc
being kicked out on the street," said 1 percen
Terrace resident Gerald Huntley. "Pe
"We're concerned that 50 people are out of
going to be kicked out of Ann said."
Arbor. Regardless of how you Arbor
shuffle around, 50 people are still all tim
displaced," he said. set asi
becaus
IN THE long run, the others.
destruction of the 39 units in the A s
two Terrace buildings and the of the
probable destruction of the other that th
eight buildings should exacerbate an 50 per
already severe housing crunch. The Group
supply of available units is studen

anger
rng, while the price is rising.
ording to William Hampton.
ty's Assistant Director of
unity Development, the
y rate in the city is less than
nt.
ople are already being forced
the city" by high rents, he
"Almost all units in Ann
are almost always rented at
es. There's no incentive to
de housing for low income
e they can be rented out to
urvey conducted by Fred Bohl
city planning office reports
e median rent has increased
cent over the past six years.
s on fixed incomes, like
its, suffer most.

The Office of Major Events presents

SUR

'OR

Mm

"Eye of
The Tiger"

"Is This
Love"

OLIN SANG RUBY UNION
INSTITUTE
A Jewish educational and recreational summer camp
in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin,
will be interviewing on campus
Monday, February 2, from 10 AM to 2 PM
Staff positions available include counselors,
water front staff, specialty staff
and much, much more!
HILLEL
1429 Hill Street
For appointment call 663-3336
Your Summer Job
more than just employment...
CAMP TAMARACK
CAMP MAAS, CAMP KENNEDY
AGREE OUTPOST,
TEEN ADVNETURE TRIPS
SILVERMAN VILLAGE
(for the emotionally impaired)
POSITIONS FOR:
* Cabin and Specialist Counselors
I Administrative and Food Service Staff
* Unit and Specialist Supervisors
f Many Other Leadership Positions
' INTERVIEWING
TIEAY

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 15
HILL AUDITORIUM, 7:30
Tickets Available at Michigan Union Ticket Office
and All Ticket World Outlets
CHARGE BY PHONE 763-TKTS

gm 1riamds of
V"rda[Ly inwite 9youto fw"&
noted acuth ia n [m
tV..
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