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September 05, 1986 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-05

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 5, 1986 -Page 3
Frat rebuilds house, image

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By MARTHA SEVETSON
Some members of Beta
Theta Pi fraternity arrived in
Ann Arbor this week to find a
partially constructed house,
forcing them to commute from
home, stay with friends, or
even temporarily live at the
Bell Tower Hotel.
The fraternity's $1 million
renovation, scheduled to be
completed by September, was
delayed because the
fraternity's alumni board
decided to prolong it rather
than pay higher rates to
contractors.
FRATERNITY members
will be allowed to move into the
house in two weeks, when
living quarters will be
completed. The rest of the house
will be finished by January,
members said.
The fraternity has rebuilt
its house three times since the
chapter was established in
1845. The current renovation
was initiated by the Beta Theta
Pi national chapter, which had
expressed dissatisfaction with
the fraternities "apathetic"
attitude and the house's
deterioration, according to
LSA junior John Sullivan, a
fraternity member.
Before renovation began,
the house had been plagued by
loose electrical wires,
problems with hot water, and
general disrepair.
ALTHOUGH the
renovation will cost an
estimated $1 million,
fraternity members and
alumni have raised only

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Associated Press'
Cheers
Britain's Prince Charles doffs his cap at Harvard University's 350th con-
,vocation in Cambridge, Mass. yesterday.

Daily Photo by PETE ROSS

'U' sociology prof wins
coveted Sorokin Award

The Beta Theta Pi fraternity house stands partially rebuilt earlier this week. Fraternity members are now
living in temporary housing. The new house, funded by alumni donations, will double living quarter space in
the house.

From staff reports
University Sociology Prof.
Aldon Morris has won the
prestigious Sorokin Award, the
most coveted prize in sociology.
Morris learned he had won the
award last Sunday, two days
before it was officially announced
at the American Sociological
Association's annual meeting in
New York City.
"I started getting wind of it
Saturday night, and then the
chair of the committee that gives
the award called me Sunday and
told me I had won," Morris said
last night.
Morris won the award for his
1984 book, "The Origins of the

Civil Rights Movement."
The official name of the award
is the "Distinguished Con-
tribution to Scholarship" prize of
the American Sociological
Association, but it is commonly
referred to by its previous
name-the Sorokin Award-
after one of the founders of
American sociology.
Morris came to the University
as an assistant professor in 1980
after receiving his masters and
Ph.D. in sociology at the State
University of New York,
Stonybrook.
Another University professor,
Jeffrey Paige, won the Sorokin
Award 10 years ago.

$400,000 thus far., said
fraternity member John
Hensien, an LSA sophomore.
Members are currently
planning several alumni
events to seek more donations.
Despite the current
inconvenience, members
remain confident that the
refurbished house will attract
new members and help

improve the fraternity's
image.
"It's not that much of an
inconvenience," said
Hensien, who is living at the
Bell Tower Hotel. LSA junior
Joe Roberts, who will spend a
half hour commuting to classes
each day, added, "I think it
will be worth it."
THE FRATERNITY

expects to conduct rush events
from a tent in the front yard,
but members insist this will
not affect their recruiting
ability.
"This will help rush for all
freshmen who see the
opportunity to join something
that's growing," said
fraternity president Chris
Litrel, an LSA junior.

Peace marchers sponsor rallies at 'U' arrival

T HE

By MICHAEL LUSTIG
Forty women participating in
the Great Peace March arrived at
the University yesterday to
sponsor three days of rallies and
demonstrations for global nuc -
lear disarmament.
Today the women will lead a
march to North Campus and hold
a "die-in" to protest nuclear
weapons research. They will
camp out on the Diag tonight and
lead another march to City Hall
tomorrow, when Mayor Ed Pierce
will plant a symbolic peace tree.
MARJORIE Winkelman, a
Residential College junior, left
the University last winter to join
the march, which began March 1
in Los Angeles. The march was
plagued with problems from the
beginning. Only 1,200 people, far
less than ap expected 5,000,
signed up and PRO-Peace, a
national organization founded to
administer the march, suffered
financial collapse in mid-
March.
About 450 people, including
Winkelman, continued the
march and now plan to arrive in

Washington, D.C. Nov. 15.
Winkelman said the march
has four goals: to implement a
global nuclear test ban; to freeze
nuclear weapon construction; to
reduce the number of existing
nuclear weapons; and to ban on
all weapons from space.
WINKELMAN said that
although these are lofty goals, she
has learned from experience that
"One person can make a
difference." Members of the Great
Peace March, the environmental"
protection group Greenpeace, and
activist Daniel Ellsburg of the
American Peace Test prevented
testing of a nuclear device at the
Nevada Test Site for three days by
trespassing onto the base, she
said.
Marchers have received varied
reactions from people they met in
their cross-country journey. In
Claremont, Calif., Winkelman
said, city officials refused to
grant the marchers camping
permits, but local church and
peace groups offered them space.
In Iowa, local residents and
activist groups joined the march

trail and offered marchers ice
cream.
Winkelman and Lorien
Cooney, a former toy store
manager from Berkeley, Calif.,
agreed that marchers received a
cool reception' in Omaha, Neb.
Winkelman was among 60 people

detained for trespassing at the
Strategic Air Command base in
that city., Because the air
command controls U.S. defense
systems and employs many
people in Omaha, Winkelman
See WOMEN, Page 14

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Look for The Michigan Daily's guide to
campus events starting Monday on this
page and Fridays in Weekend Magazine.

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THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave. - 662-4466
(between Hill and S. University Street)
WILLIAM HILLEGONDS, SENIOR MINISTER
Sunday Worship Services at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Church School, including nurseries,
at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Sunday Bible Study 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Communion Service 7:00 p.m.
PICNIC TO WELCOME NEW MEMBERS
SEPTEMBER 7, 4:00 P.M., ON THE CHURCH LAWN
FALL 1986
ENGLISH COMPOSITION
BOARD
WRITING WORKSHOP
1025 ANGELL HALL
Attention: LS&A Students
All Students Enrolled in LS&A Classes
Free assistance is available for students
who want to improve their writing skills or
who need help with academic or non-academic writing projects

For Major Events Concerts
MASS MEETING
Tuesday, Sept. 9,7:30 p.m.
Pendleton Room Michigan Union
VETERAN USIER - Those who have ushered
.Major Events concerts in the past.
NEW USHERS - Those who would like to usher
Major Events concerts.

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