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September 05, 1986 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-05

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4

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 5, 1986
Inquiring
Photographer
By Andi Schreiber =

The Daily wants to know the answer to the most
popular question on campus, "How was your
summer?"

Stu Harris, LSA junior:
My summer was ful -
filling but not relaxing.
I worked in New York
City for a commercial
real estate company,
Coldwell Banker -
they're number one in the
country. The best part
about being back in Ann
Arbor is having the stir-
fryed chicken special at
Dunburi.

Cindy Feuer, LSA
junior: It was fine but I
craved Ann Arbor, just
the easy-going, friendly
element. It's like a
vacation to come back,
one that lasts nine
months. Summer is a
time for work.

Marc Hazzard, engin -
eering junior: Well, it
was nice but it was too
much work. I was a
stockperson/shoplifter
chaser at Perry Drugs.
I'm glad to be back on
campus, like here on the
Diag. I got everything
out of Detroit that it had to
offer.

k
Wendy Jacobson, LSA
junior: It was fun. I was
a waitress near my
cottage in Northport,
Michigan. I made tons of
money in tips. I was such
a bad waitress that my
customers felt sorry for
me.

Alok Ghosh, LSA senior:
I got obstreperously
trashed for seven weeks
in amazing London.
Lady Di looked sweet at
the Royal Wedding.

I
I

Gloria Kim;LSA senior
1/2: Excellent!

Patricia Allen, LSA
freshman: Great. I went
to Tennessee, Missi -
ssippi, Kentucky, and the
Bahamas. I visited
family in the South and
just partied in the
Bahamas. My brain is
getting reoriented now, I
didn't use it a lot during
the summer.

Brant Hinrichs, engin -
eering senior: Very
good. I was in New York
working in Brookhaven
National Lab. I was
working on a high
energy physics experi-
ment for a U-M
professor. I grew spir-
itually because I found a
good church/fellowship
group out there.

Jane Schwartz, LSA
junior: It was amazing,
the best summer of my
life. If you ever get the
chance to study in
Europe, don't pass it up. I
studied in Spain and
traveled to Florence and
Paris. I spent three days
in the Louvre.

Steve Molitor, LSA
returning freshman: It
was alright. It was my
first summer as a
civilian. I just got out of
the army a few months
ago. I was in Jamaica for
three weeks. It was nice
because it gave me a
chance to relax.

IN BRIEF
COMPILED FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS AND
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS
Two ballot proposals blocked
LANSING- The door to Michigan's Nov. 4 ballot slammed
shut yesterday on a proposal to curb utility rate increases, a day
after a bid to permit the death penalty in Michigan was closed out.
The state Supreme Court rejected a last-ditch request by the
Michigan Citizens Lobby to reconsider its bar to proposals on the
death penalty and limiting utility rate increases for unfinished or
unneeded power plants.
The Supreme Court voted 6-0 to turn down the request, saying,
"It does not appear the (earlier) order was entered erroneously."
On Wednesday, the Michigan Court of-Appeals rejected "for
lack of merit" a suit to get the death penalty proposal on the Nov. 4
ballot. Also Wednesday, Ingham County Circuit Judge James
Giddings made a similar ruling on a lawsuit filed by the Citizens
Lobby in an attempt to salvage its utility rate proposal.
Stock market reaches a high
NEW YORK- The stock market soared to record highs
yesterday, propelled by a wave of buying by professional program
traders.
Analysts said hopes for lower interest rates and intensifying
enthusiasm for oil stocks helped the Dow Jones industrial average
surpass a peak that had stood for more than two months, and
carried several other market indicators to new highs as well.
Dow Jones' average of 30 blue chips jumped 38.38 to 1,919.71,
topping the previous closing high of 1,909.03 set on July 2.
It was the fifth largest point gain ever recorded by the average,
and the biggest since it climbed 39.03 on March 14.
Volume on the New York Stock Exchange reached 189.42
million shares, the seventh biggest total ever, against 154.31
million Wednesday.
Knowledge of trade proposalA
denied by Soviet spokesman
MOSCOW- A Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman said
yesterday that he knew nothing about a proposed deal to release
American reporter Nicholas Daniloff, jailed for six days on
suspicion of spying.
U.S. officials in Washington said the State Department has
proposed Daniloff be freed in exchange for temporarily releasing a -
Soviet physicist arrested in New York on spy charges.
Under the deal, Soviet U.N. employee Gennady Zakharov
would be released into the custody of the Soviet ambassador until
his trial. There also would be an understanding that he might be
swapped in some future deal with the Soviets, the U.S. officials
said.
Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman Gennady Gerasimov,
asked about the proposed deal, told a news conference yesterday he
did not know about such a proposal and said, "I am an official
spokesman. I can't comment on things that are being done
unofficially."
Romanian family seeks asylum
WASHINGTON- Seven Romanians visiting the U.S. Capitol
- a man, his four sons and their grandparents - yesterday asked
police officers for asylum in the United States.
The Romanians, who approached a Capitol policeman outside
the building's East Front, were questioned by officers with the aid
of several congressional staff members attempting to act as
interpreters, said the Senate's sergean t arms, Ern t Garcia.
Capitol Police Chief James Carvino said routine questions were
posed to the family and their answers were being relayed to the.
State Department, where the request for te.mporary asylum wasp
evaluated.
Garcia said the family told Capitol Police they had previously :
requested asylum from the Swedish government but had been t
turned down.
But Ulf Hjertonsson, chief of the political office at the Swedish «
Embassy here, said in a telephone interview, "No, no such thing
happened."
Random tampering blamed
for Cup-A-Soup poisoning
CAMDEN, N.J.- The cyanide death of a man who ate chicken
noodle Cup-A-Soup was almost certainly a case of product -
tampering but it appears to be a random incident, a prosecutor
says.
Larry Hicks, a spokesman for Thomas J. Lipton Inc., said
authorities found that the mix's envelope was slit and the box was
punctured. "It all points to a product tampering," Hicks said.
"It appears to be a random incident. There is no indication of

any retribution against the store or the individual," said Dennis
Wixted, first assistant county prosecutor. He added that there have
been no calls claiming responsibility or making threats.
Louis Denber, of Runnemede, died after eating the soup
Monday. He told his girlfriend that the soup "tasted funny" and
"didn't look right," Asbell said., Denber took about two sips, threw
the soup into the sink and then became violently ill, the prosecutor
said.
(t le fit tgan ' gIl
Vol. XCVII No.2
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday
through Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription
rates: September through April-$18 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the
city. One term-$10 in town; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and
subscribes to Pacific News Service and the Los Angeles Times
Syndicate.

P~
t.
k,
I

. Tuesday Lunch Lectures
CURRENT WORLD ISSUES: AN UPDATE
12 Noon
At The
International Center - 603 E. Madison St.
September 9: The Philippines - What Hope For The Future?
Speaker: MICHAEL CULLINANE, Center for S&SE Asian Studies
Sponsored by The Ecumenical Campus Center and the Philippine-Michigan Club

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