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September 04, 1986 - Image 68

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-04
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



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By Noelle Brower
A NN ARBOR is a city of
movement; in between classes
students stream from one hall of.
academia to another; in the Diag they
play hacky-sack or spin around on
skateboards. In the streets there is
the stop and go traffic fighting to beat
the next red light, and dodge the
students on bicycles. In the clubs and
bars at night, bodies move to the music
of the latest D.J. or cool band. But
there is another form of movement
different from the above yet one that
nonetheless encompasses all forms of
movement: Dance. Whether it is the
most recent show staged by the
Department of Dance's Ann Arbor
Dance Works, or some spectacle from
a renowned touring company, Ann
Arbor is a city that moves in unison
with the times, yet beats a rhythm of
its own.
In recent years, with the arrival of
several young and inspired dancers as
faculty members, the University's
Department of Dance has slowly
emerged as an artistic force in Ann
Arbor. In its small studio on the
second floor of the Dance building, the
faculty hosts shows ranging from Faculty members of the dance department have brought fresh talent to
senior presentations to faculty con- Ann Arbor.
certs. No eetd matterwhtevlfsklis
crs.Noedtevery show level of skill undertaken shows. The amount of effort put intocap is the Ann Arbor Dance Work
preseneeeysoisudran their shows is reflected in the con- which premiered last year to rav
with the same seriousness and care as sistently good productions they reviews and sold-out crowds. Ti
any professional company. The present. company of dancers is drawn from ti
faculty and its students are a team The feather in the Department's talented faculty itself. The compa
and all work together on each other's went to New York last fall, where the

By John Logie
(.CORDED MUSIC is extremely
R{ useful in dormitories. Because
dormitory walls are all wafer thin, it's
important to have a handy supply of
background music to insure a
modicum of sonic privacy. On the
other hand, if one's neighbors refuse
to maintain a decibel level that is
tolerable it's nice to have something
to blast back with, like John and
Yoko's Live Peace in Toronto played
at maximum volume, or perhaps the
entire Flipper library played back-to-
back.
Sure most new students come to the
University with a woefully inadequate
recorded arsenal, we commend these
stores to you:
Schoolkids' (523 E. Liberty):
Hitting the S-kids is habit-
forming. Schoolkids' is first in the
hearts of Michigan students, and one
stroll through the store will tell you
why. It has everything: Rock, blues,
jazz, classical, cut-outs, funk, impor-
ts, New Age music, folk, soundtracks,
comedy, 45s, and viritually anything
else are all available at Schoolkids',
and most anything they don't have
they can order. The selection is so
good it borders on dangerous. Take
only as much money as you can afford
to part with - you'll part with it.

SKR Classical (Liberty): At
presstime this separate, specialized
sister store to Schoolkids' had not
opened, so it's hard to say what the
ramifications of this new store will be.
Will the main store still have a
classicl section? Is SKR big enough
and clever enough to do classical
properly? Can three record stores
peacefully co-exist on one block?
These and many more questions will
be resolved by what will undoubtedly
be a most enjoyable fact-finding
mission.
Liberty Music (417 E. Liberty):
Liberty is the established classical
music store, featuring an extensive
library, and knowledgable
salespeople. There's also a lot of
weird stuff in the store - Broadway
Cast records dating back to the dawn
of man, obscure operas. But the best
thing about Liberty is its listening
booths, where customers are en-
couraged to sample their selections
before purchasing them.
Discount Records (300 S. State):
Discount is part of a chain of record
stores, and that limits it somewhat,
but lately it has made some moves
that are designed to keep it up to
speed with its competitors, and the
store is looking and shopping better
than ever. The addition of some hep
help that don't stare blankly when

music, then go up to the ol' Wazoo, the
student's choice for the best used
record store for four years running.
Wazoo is a vinyl funhouse with a
strong selection of recent releases,
bolstered by excellent out-of-print and
import sections...a cheap bin that
rivals the Salvation Army's, and a
record hunt service that is
remarkably effective. The at-
mosphere is pleasant, if cramped, and
the bulk of the records come with a
guarantee. You may never pay full
price for a record again.
P.J.'s (619 Packard): Although
P.J.'s is somewhat removed from the
campus record nexus, it is easily wor
th the walk (get a shake from Pizza
Bob on the way and things will be
downright pleasant). P.J.'s is a grass-
roots, community-oriented operation
run by some of the most genial people
in town. The selection is very good,
asked about Camper Van Beethoven with specialization in jazz, and
make Discount an up-and-coming throw-back stuff from the decade
outlet. when music really mattered. Often
State Discount (307 S. State): More! times the discs come in a complimen-
a drugstore than a record store really, tary plastic baggy, which is a nice
but State Discount gets all the major touch. This ain't the place for com-
releases and sells them cheaply. If pact discs, but for concert tickets,
Billboard has heard of it, State good conversation, and a cramped but
Discount probably has it, and has it entertaining swing through stacks of
for peanuts if you get it while its hot. wax, P.J.'s is the place.
Wazoo Records (3361/2 S. State): If Schoolkids' Used and Rare (514 E.
you don't mind mildly manhandled William): Put the emphasis on rare.

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Dance Theatre Studio

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Classes in ballet,
modern, jazz, tap,
and ballroom.
New Classes
beginning September 8
For current class
schedule and
more information
call 995-4242.

A0

SZE-CHUAN WEST
Specializing in Sze-chuan, Hunan, and Mandarine cuisine
DINING - COCKTAILS - CARRY-OUT

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THE DETROIT NEWS' choice
as "the best new Chinese
restaurant for 1980" now
in Ann Arbor with another

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WE'RE CLOSE BY & RIGHT
ON YOUR WAY
E. HURON
E. LIBERTY I~. A
N.UNIVERSITY
E WILA
/ IN
z 4-A
CRISLER
ARENA
STADIUM BLVD.
1) 337 MAYNARD
2) 3752 S. STATE ST.
3) 2000 W. STADIUM BLVD. (Y\
O

Fit THIS mb
new sched
M
GE T O
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ONLY AT:
McDonald's®
337 MAYNARD 2000 W. S
(NEXT TO NICKELS ARCADE) ANN A
3752 S. STATE
, ANN ARBOR
*Sorry, Does Not Apply to McD.L. T.
Limit ONE COUPON PER CUSOTMER, M
\ t Offer Not Valid With Any Other Offer With Thi
OFFER EXPIRES: OCTOBER 4,
I EEEEEEUEEEEE

great restaurant to serve /
you better!
VOTED BEST CHINESE RESTAURANT
IN "BEST OF ANN ARBOR"
BY YOU, THE STUDENT
Open 7 days a week

711 N. University (necr State Street) " Ann Arbor

Mon.-Thurs. 11:30 -10:00
Friday 11:30-11:00
Saturday 12:00 -11:00
Sunday 12:00 -10:00

2161 W, STADIUM
Phone 769-5722

Page 4 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 4, 1986

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