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September 04, 1986 - Image 67

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-04
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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By Rebecca Chung
W HEN discussing books with
a University student, one could
mean two things: those tomes

bought for classes that inspire a love-
hate relationship (emphasis on the
latter) and those wonderful things
that either cost too much or un-
believably little, get read on buses or
during warm afternoons on the Diag

and are destined to become part of
one's permanent baggage.
Ann Arbor's many bookstores are
quite willing to sell students these
packages of agony and ecstasy.
However, every shop has a unique

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POSTERS
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AR

ambiance and set of caveats, and the
art of browsing takes precious time to
perfect. In order to facilitate this
overview, I will discuss the necessary
first, and then the indulgent
TEXTBOOKS
University Cellar: "Ann Arbor's
only non-profit student bookstore" is
also the campus's only student-run
operation. Three stories high, it
carries a full ange of office, artist,
scientific, and engineering sup-
plies.Pluses include the lowest prices
of any store, and the opportunity to
choose one's own books (all texts are
labeled and placed on open shelves,
new and used next to each other).
Drawbacks: long lines during rush,

mostly spent lugging four or five
classes worth of books to the register,
and a location that guarantees a long
walk even for Barbour-
Newberry/West Quad inhabitants.
Also carries gifts, cards, posters, and
Michigan apparel, and has a North
Campus location inside the student
commons, making it the most con-
venient place for Bursley residents.
Ulrich's: Just slightly more expen-
sive than U. Cellars, it makes up the
difference in convenience and per-
sonable service. Students fill out a
rush slip, hand it to someone at the
long back counter (stacks are closed
to browsers during rush), and voila!
the books appear within minutes (new
or used depending upon request). If

By Noelle Brower
FOR THOSE with a theatrical
flare, or those who simply like
the world of make believe, Ann Arbor
offers a rich resource of opportunities
in which to indulge. No matter what
one's own idea of theatre is, it's bound

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sponsored theatre organizations is the
Department of Theatre and Drama it-1
self. Though it has come under fire in
the last few years because of its lack
of consistently good productions and
rumors of inner turmoil, it has recen-
tly undergone major changes under
the auspices of its new head, John
Russell Brown.
atre department in a new direction.
Brown, who assumed this respon-
sibility in the fall of '85, originally
came to the campus via the
celebrated lecture series "Beckett at
80," where he delivered one of several
speeches on the Irish playwright.
When he took over as head of the
department, replacing Walter

Essylinck, he threw himself into the
thick of things, immediately
establishing Project Theatre, a forum
which brings top-flight professional
actors and theatrical technicians to
Ann Arbor. Brown himelf is the Ar-
tistic Director of Project Theatre and
last year directed two daring produc-
tions: D.H. Lawrence's rarely per-
formed The Daughter-in-law, and the
English premier of Antique Pink that
starred Kim Hunter.
Unfortunately, because of the
tremendous financial difficulties, the
Master of Fine Arts program was cur-
tialed and the PhD program was put
on temporary hold. These ter-
minations leave the department bare
with only the University Players (the
undergraduate theatre group), and
Project Theatre. However, Brown has
not stopped his forward thrust and
only seems to be just gaining momen-
tum in the realization of his ideas.
In the fall Benedict Nightingale will
join the faculty of the department as
assistant director and will head the
undergraduate program. If the name
is familiar to you, it may be because
Nightingale has spent the last year as
a drama critic for the New York
Times. His current book is entitled
Fifth Row Centers and details his
year as drama critic in New York
(look for a review of his book come
fall). With Brown in charge and the
new blood he's brought in to revive a
sagging department, the future looks
like a healthy one for the Department
of Theatre of Drama.
Another University-sponsored
theatre program is the University Ac-
tivity Center's MUSKET which stages
one or two rather large productions
each school year. Though in the past
MUSKET has walked the straight and
usually narrow path by staging
relatively mild shows, they struck out
this year and staged the difficult and
controversial Webber/Rice musical
Evita. The student-directed and
student-run MUSKET deserves
plaudits for having the daring to take
such a risk - and succeed.
Another U.A.C. sponsored theatre
group is the SophSHOW which
produces one show annually. Last
year this student-run organization
performed the musical Once Upon a
Mattress. If you're interested in the

sort of comraderie that one achieves
when one does something with one's
friends, then the U.A.C. MUSKET or
SophSHOW could be right for you.
It's good, clean, thespian fun.
The R.C. Players, an outgrowth of
the Residential College in East Quad,
are known for their productions of
student written and directed plays.

Last year U-Players performed Alfred Ja

pee
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org
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JL N
MANY POSTERS
and under
gallery posters - most under $20

Remarkably, the quality of their
productions and material is usually
quite high. Make the trip to East
Quad. They welcome all who are in-
terested in exploring the
many possibilities of theatre
The Brecht Company is another
group based in East Quad. It
specializes in, what else, performing
the modern master himself. This
group of actors and actresses is highly
trained in the technique of theatre
necessary to performing Brecht. But
they are not down-trodden with old
fashioned ideas and means of doing
things; in some ways they are the
most modern of theatre companies on
campus, utilizing contemporary
music or interesting juxtapostions in
their drama; and they don't always
perform Brecht either. This spring
they staged Caryl Churchill's Vinegar
Tom. If you seek the unusual and the
up-beat, or are curious to see what your

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Daily Photo by DAN HABIB
A customer browses over the plentiful supply of books.

John Russell Brown: Taking the thea
to find an outlet in Ann Arbor, where
the concrete sidewalks often imitate
the wooden boards of a stage, and vice
versa. Ann Arbor is what you make of
it. There is no reason to be bored here,
and if you have thatspecial something, you
never will be.
First among the various University

Art reproductions, dance, sports, rock and movie stills, laser images, M.C. Escher,
gallery posters, nostalgic posters, Van Gogh, photography, Rockwell, Monet,
wildlife prints, movies, Picasso, Asian art, animal posters. Harvey Edwards,
Frazetta, music images, floral grahics, science fiction, Rembrandt, modern & ab-
stract images, Eliot Porter, Rosamond, art deco, art nouveau, Renoir, travel post-
ers, scenic posters, Chagall, astronomy, Dali, humor, cars.. . . . .
and MUCH, MUCH MORE.
redSHOW AND SALE
iYI

UNIVERSITY
TOWERS
The Best of Campus Lifer

First order of checks FREE
for new student accounts opened
at our two campus locations.
Checking and savings;
NBD 24-hour banker;
overdraft protection.
We look forward to serving you!
SUBSIDIARY OF NBD BANCORP, INC./MEMBER FDiC
Michigan Union, Lower Level " 995-8037
Campus Office - E. William at Thompson * 995-8080
Ten Other Convenient Locations

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Rated # 1 b
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FURNISHED APARTMENTS
GREAT LOCATION
Corner of
S. University & Forest'
536 S. Forest Ave.
761-2680

Callfor student price
MASTERCARD - VISA - AMERICA

* FORBIDDEN CITY WEST
3535 Plymouth Road 665-3591

"
4!

Page 18 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 4, 19986

The, Michigan Daily -- Thursday

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