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October 28, 1986 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


New Nite Owl bus routes
CATHERINE
a 4,... HUROVANN
} WG i
WASHINGTON

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, October 28, 1986 -Page 3
Regent's bylaw may
hinder Mandela degre

Li
SRaickham

MEDICAL CAMPUS
UN/V TERR. e
Markley. ton

Mosher-
LIBERTY WJordan
t,-/
Stockwell
WL.UN/V. North route
W/LL/AM/ /C.C.R.B.
Chem-
Nat. Sci. South route
S.A.B THE c.
JEFFERSON DIAG Little
Mich. Angell Undergrad. OEDDFs
Union Hall Library
West Quad ,r
MADISON . LAW
QUAD
MONROE
South /"East
Quad /Qa
HILL Q uadIf./,.
HOOVER N
l.M. Bldg. 7;.

(Continued from Page 1)
September. The committee will
consider a number of options, in-
cluding continuing the current
policy and abolishing honorary
degrees.
Committee members would not
comment on the Mandela degree or
the bylaw that prohibits him from
receiving the honorary degree.
Although the ad hoc committee
will make recommendations, only
the regents can change the bylaws
and the University's degree policy.
Hector Delgado, a member of the
Free South Africa Coordinating
Committee, said he has "doubts"
that the regents will change the
controversial bylaw.
DELGADO SAID regents
may be avoiding political pressure
by relying on the bylaw. "If the
bylaw is changed, everyone will be
watching to see how each regent
votes. This may cause regents who

privately oppose the Mandela degree
to vote in favor of it," Delgado
said.
Delgado, a sociology graduate
student, said the University admin-
istration can't avoid the Mandela
degree controversy by saying the
University is politically neutral.
"Not giving the degree makes just
as big a statement as giving the
degree," he said.
Vice President for Government
Relations Richard Kennedy, who is
a member of the group that selects
honorary degree recipients, said the
regents can make an exception
about giving a degree to someone
not present at the graduation
ceremony.
Kennedy said his committee,
chaired by University President
Harold Shapiro, "will consider"
Mandela for an honorary degree.
The committee has not yet met this
fall.

TUESDAY LUNCH LECTURES
12 NOON
at the
INTERNATIONAL CENTER - 603 E. Madison
October 28: "Ethical Dilemmas in the Multi-Versity"
Speaker: TERRANCE TICE, Professor of Education
at the University of Michigan

Sponsored by
the Ecumenical Campus Center
and The International Center

Lunch Available:.$1.00 (students)
$1.50 (others)

Map indicates the two new Nite Owl routes-one running north and one
running south-that replaced the old route beginning Oct. 12. Nite Owl is a

Daily Graphic by BILL MARSH
free bus service that runs every 30 minutes from 7 to 9:30 p.m. and 12:30
to 2 a.m. It runs every 20 minutes from 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.

New routes confuse Nite Owl riders

(Continued from Page 1)
According to Milano, confusion
about the new routes resulted from
inadequate publicity. LSA senior
Carolyn Lanier, who works at the
Campus Information Center (CIC)
in the Union, said the center didn't
receive handout maps of the new
routes until the week after the
;hanges became effective.
Shortly after the expansion,
Lanier said she answered about 15
questions during her two-hour shift
tit CIC. ;She now averages about
five inquiries on the Nite Owl per
thift.
. "WHAT WE told them is,
We're sorry, but we don't have the

information-try calling transpor-
tation or the Sexual Assault Pre-
vention and Awareness Center,"
Lanier said.
Lanier, a self-described "veteran"
rider of Nite Owl, walked to her
house on Hill Street at 2 a.m. the
Sunday the schedule changed. She
missed the bus because she was
unaware that it stopped on the other
side of State Street instead of in
front of the Union.
Julie Steiner, director of the
Sexual Assault Prevention and
Awareness Center, said posters and
handouts showing the new routes
are being designed and will be
distributed to residence halls,

libraries, and almost all campus
buildings.
"We get calls. I feel terrible, I
wish it was all done," Steiner said.
"I think that we're getting close;
I'm hoping within a week."
LSA JUNIOR Mary Walker
"just happened" to hear about the
new routes; the southbound bus
now drops her off a block away
from her house off Hill Street.
"Before it seemed like you were
stranded. In winter, you're basically
stranded where you're at," Walker
said.
"I think it will reduce risk of
getting assaulted-that has to do

with being in the wrong place at
the wrong time. It's not like you
want to invite something like that,"
she added.
Milano said the most positive
feedback he's received about the
new routes is the inclusion of the
athletic campus. He also said the
Markley stop is "really popular."
"The only negative things I've
heard is that people weren't aware
one stop (Washtenaw and
Cambridge) was eliminated,"
Milano said. "Far outweighing was
the positive feedback on the
Athletic Campus."

The University of Michigan
Medical School
Thirty-Second Annual
Student Medical Research
Forum
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1986 - TODAY
11:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
TOWSLEY.CENTER FOR
CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION
Sheldon Area

Council delays new

MME
THU
Campus Cinema
The Bridge On The River
Kwai (David Lean, 1957), CG,
6:15 & 9:15 p.m., Aud A.
Sessue Hayakawa and Alec
Guiness clash brilliantly as a
Japaneese POW camp leader and
his unbreakable British captive.
William Holden is an escaped
prisoner who returns to destroy
the bridge they're clashing over.
The African Queen (John
Huston, 1952), MTF, 7:45
p.m., Mich.
Bogie is a gruff Canadian
riverboat pilot ,and Katherine
Hepburn is a prissy missionary
who must float past the
Japaneese invaders and deal with
falling in love at the same.
"Leeches!"
The World Of Roger
Corman, Eye, 8:00 p.m., 214
N. 4th.
Featuring one film about
Corman (Roger Corman:
Hollywood's Wild Angel)
and one movie by him (Gas-s-
s). The latter is a classic, a hip,
mod flick about a gas that kills
every one over 20 years-old and
leaves the beautiful, cool kids to
make a new start.
Performances
{ Billi Gordon- Nectarine
Ballroom, 11 p.m., 763-4186.
Billi will perform "Blowing
Chunks," an original comedy
show.
Speakers
Robert Eno- "The Art of
Truth-making: Methods in Early
Chinese Philosophy,"
Philosophy Dept. and the Center
for Chinese Studies, noon,
Commons Room, Lane Hall.
fZ .1.".I U t~ ie.... -... "4A C....

LI14

Next for American Business," 4
p.m., Rackham Lecture Hall.
Margie Barritt- "Archives
in the Netherlands," The
Netherlands America University
League, 8 p.m., International
Center, 603 E. Madison.
Margaret Drabble-
"Reading from her Works,"
Visiting Writers Series, 4 p.m.,
Rackham Ampitheatre.
Kurt Vonnegut- Hill Street
Forum/Great Writers Series, 8
p.m., Hill Auditorium.
R. D'Alimonte- "Recent
Trends in Italian Politics," 4
p.m., 5208 Angell Hall.
Dr. Nigel Bowels and Ms.
Janice Hulme- "Study
Abroad at the University of
Edinburgh," U-M International
Center, noon, International
Center Lounge.
Mary Cattani- "Study
Abroad with Scandinavian," U-
M International Center, 3:30
p.m., International Center.
Meetings
Christians in Action-
8:30 p.m., Michigan Union.
Omicron Delta Epsilon-
5:15 p.m., 173 Lorch Hall.
Job Hunt Club- noon, 350
S. Thayer.
Circumnavigators Club-
Michigan Chapter- 7 p.m.,
East Conference Room,
Rackham Bldg.
Furthermore
3th Annual Medical
School Research Forum-
11 a.m.- 4:30 p.m., Towsley
Center for Continuing Medical.
Education, (936-1494).
Asian Art- Art Breaks,
Museum of Art, 12:10 p.m.

shopping
(Continued from Page 1)
commercial area to 16.1 acres,
allotting 7.85 acres for a short-stay
apartment complex, and providing
additional land buffers to set back
development and parking. The plan
would also close Nixon Road
between Huron Parkway and
Plymouth Road to provide
additional parking, decrease traffic
congestion, and provide a "green-
belt" between the University Center
and Plymouth malls.
Jerald Jernigan (R-Fourth Ward)
said he supported sending the
proposal back to the planning
commission so it could approve the
road and zoning changes before

naIl plan
sending it back to city council.
The revised plan drew more
support from residents and
businessmen than the original plan.
Most residents who objected to the
revised plan said that there was still
no need for additional shopping
malls in northeast Ann Arbor.
Kerrytown merchant Mary Riley
said she felt the town had no need
for more shopping centers. "It
seems to me that we can do better
than another shopping center," she
said.
The planning commission will
consider changes recommended by
the developer of the proposed
shopping mall.

Study shows A2 home
has high radon level

(Continued from Page 1)
area. This area includes North
Campus housing for 2,000 married
students and six to eight apartment
buildings occupied by students,
according to the housing office.
Arnold Jacobson, a University
environmental health professor, said
one way to reduce high levels of
radon in the Ann Arbor house is to
open the windows and let the radon
out. He said radon gas is often a
problem in energy-efficient homes
because the gas enters and
homogenizes with the air in the
house and continues to recirculate
through the heat and cooling
systems.
NICK GROMICKO, manager
of the Pittsburgh radon project, said
participants entered the study by
answering an ad. For $12, they
received a radon kit which included
a canister-shaped radon detector and
a postage-paid return label. All
32,000 participants from across the
nation allowed the radon detectors
to sit for one week in their homes

University, attributed the recent
radon scare to improved measuring
techniques and energy efficiency. He
said radon has always been present
in the air, but shows itself only
under certain circumstances.
Griffin explained that radon
comes from radium. Because radium
has a half-life of only three and one-
half days there must be a significant
radium source for high levels of
radon to persist, he said. Griffing
said that if a house is well-
ventilated it may have a high radon
level one day and a very low one
the next day.
Griffin also said rock containing
radium is sometimes used to make
cement walls. If radon gas is
emitted from the walls, a special
paint can be used to prevent the gas
from escaping, he said.
Red
nui

They Dare To Be Free!
The Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry
Presents:
A SYMPOSIUM
ON SOVIET JEWRY
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2,7:00 P.M.
FREE ADMISSION
RACKHAM AMPHITHEATER

Te Panel:
* Sister Rose Thering
-internationally known
human rights activist
" Rabbi Gerald Teller
-Head of United
Hebrew School,
Detroit
" Glenn Richter
-national Chairman
of StudentStruggle

Open
Discussion

Of:

* The Personal
experiences of
our panel members
" The effect of
US-Soviet relations
on Soviet Jewry
* Refuseniks-
who they are

Send announcements of up-
coming events to "The List,"

9

,I

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