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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 23, 1986 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Amnes
By MANALI DESAI
Amnesty International, the
worldwide human rights organ-
ization, is commemorating its 25th
anniversary by renewing its
commitment to the "Forgotten
Prisoner." '
"There is no cause for cele-
bration at this point," said James
.,O'Dea, regional director of Am-
hesty International in Washington,
D.C.
Amnesty International was
#founded in 1961 by London
attorney Peter Benenson as an office
'.for collecting and publishing
U'experts
(Continued from Page 1)
MOST proponents of deleting,
the end-use clause say that because
-f the wide diversity of research
done at the University, it is
impossible to make a moral
statement about it.
Philosophy Prof. Carl Cohen,
one of the three authors of the
minority report which proposes no

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, October 23, 1986 - Page 5
5ty International celebrates 25th year

information about prisoners of
conscience. Today it has half a
million dues-paying members
worldwide and was awarded the1977
Nobel Peace Prize.
In Ann Arbor, a group of 20 to
30 students work for Amnesty
International on a regular basis.
They recently adopted a Turkish
governor who was imprisoned on
accusations of sympathizing with
trade union activities.
The students also raise funds and
awareness in the community. But
more importantly, active members
send 10 to 20 letters a month to

authorities worldwide requesting
better prison conditions or the
release of a prisoner.
Dan Taglia, a first year law
student and Amnesty member, said
the letters surprise authorities that
there is worldwide attention being
focused on them, and they finally
"don't want to deal with the
pressure anymore."
In its Annual General Meeting
Amnesty last June recommitted
itself to the struggle to combat
human rights abuses worldwide and
decided to set up workshops, visit
Capitol Hill with appeals, and

organize delegations to dozens of
embassies to call for the release of
individual prisoners.
Amnesty doesn't advocate
violence, and instead encourages its
members to send a barrage of letters
to authorities who can stop human
rights abuses. O'Dea said Amnesty
has helped increase the level of
consciousness about atrocities, false
accusations, and inhumane
conditions imposed on prisoners all
over the world-including some in
the United States.
Amnesty criticizes the United
States for using the death penalty.

Eighteen prisoners, including one
juvenile offender, were executed this
year.
A staff of about 100 researchers
works full time, interviewing
former prisoners, diplomats and
prison officials. Amnesty also send
out missions to various countries

to interview former and current
prisoners.
One of the reasons for the
respect Amnesty has gained is that
it is largely an apolitical
organization. "We do not critique
ideology. We simply point at and
describe abuses," O'Dea said.

clash over 'human life'clause

restrictions on research, said, "The
end-use clause calls upon the
regents to make moral and
controversial statements that they
are not entitled to make."
Aerospace Engineering senior
David Vogul agreed with Cohen's
assessment. He said the end-use
clause represent "the immorality of
imposing morality upon

researchers."
Those who feel that the vast
diversity of research projects at the
University would make an end-use
clause ambiguous call for either no
clause or, in the case of Internal
Medicine Prof. David Bassett, urge
researchers to sign a statement

agreeing not to do research that
could harm human life.
Bassett initiated that idea in an
effort to preserve academic freedom
without restricting others from
doing research if they do not sign
his proposal.

National Conference on Piano Pedagogy
and
University of Michigan School of Music
presents
Ian Hobson, Piano
Friday, October 24
x 8:00 P.M.
Rackham Auditorium
"After the second
E encore, everyone was on
his feet shouting for more."
-Musical America
Hummel - Sonata in Eb Major, Op. 13
Beethoven - Sonata in FMinor, Op. 57, The Appassionata
Chopin - Six Etudes
Chopin/Godowsky - Six Etudes
Tickets $10. Available at King's Keyboard; from Joanne Smith,
UM School of Music, 2010 Moore; or at the door

Former'U'student wants
to create pro-labor party

(Continued from Page 1)
McLaughlin believes that to.
encourage business movement into
Michigan would mean gutting the
workers' compensation system.
To encourage firms to settle in
the state, McLaughlin said, "you
make it cheaper to hurt or maim
workers and harder for workers to
collect benefits."
McLaughlin criticized Blanchard
especially, alleging that he "allies
himself with strikebreakers and
union-busters."
MCLAUGHLIN named
William Davidson, the owner of a
large conglomerate in Michigan, as
one of the strikebreakers supporting
Blanchard. He added that Davidson
had contributed $4,000 to
Blanchard's campaign.
McLaughlin said employees
backed by the United Auto Workers
struck at Davidson's factory in
Cailton, Mich. and that Davidson
had brought in 400 non-union
laborers to break the, strike.
McLaughlin said the ranagement
of the factory held an election last
Friday to decide whether the union
should remain certified in the firm.
. The vote was in favor of ousting
the union, and McLaughlin said the
non-union workers Davidson
introduced tipped the balance. "This
is the first time in 50 years that a
major UAW union has been broken
in Michigan," McLaughlin said.
An employee of Davidson's
company, Guardian Industries,
acknowledged that the union had
been ousted.
MCLAUGHLIN also
criticized Blanchard for "repeatedly"
sending the Michigan National
Board
rejects
plan for
clintics
(Continued from Page 1)
beginning of each school year.
Parents would have to sign a
-blanket consent form which would
give either "all or nothing" support
of the services the clinic offers.
In a discussion, board members
said they would shoot down the
plan, because they didn't see a need
in the community for the clinic.
-Members also said they were
worried about funding the program
after the six-year grant ran out.
Most of the 15 parents who
spoke before the meeting expressed
fear about having birth control
information available in the school
because it would undermine their
iauthority. Parents also believe the
school board did not adequately
publicize the proposal.
"You want to counsel our
children on extremely personal
issues without knowing anything of
their individual personalities. ..and
you haven't even asked our
permission," said Margaret
Coonahan, a representative of the
,. - ... . .

Guard to Honduras for military,
excercises and "building the launch
pad for the coming war in Central
America."
"We are charging Reagan is
planning a war against Nicaragua
after the election, and he has the
support of the Democrats,"
McLaughlin said.
Turning to Lucas, McLaughlin
charged that the gubernatorial
candidate betrayed Wayne County
employees after he took office as
the county executive. "The AFL-
CIO. made him Wayne County
executive," McLaughlin said. "Once
in office, he turned his back on
them. He closed the Wayne County
hospital and reneged on county
employees' contractual cost of
living increases."
Deborah Townsend, a
spokeswoman for the Lucas
campaign, said Lucas did not close
the hospital. "It went into private
hands," she said.
Townsend defended Lucas'
abstinence from paying cost of
Jiving increases by saying he was
attempting to lower the county's
massive $390 million deficit by
channeling funds from employees'
wages to the struggle to make the
county financially solvent.
Townsend said Lucas favored this
strategy over raising taxes or
"massive layoffs." "He made a
tough decision," she said.
"He kept his promise to (the
AFL-CIO) by helping them keep
their jobs," Townsend said. She
added that Lucas, as an employee of
the county, was unable to collect
the wage increases.

Hill Street Forum Great Writers Series presents
Krt
Vonnegut Jr.
One of America's great writers, Kurt
Vonnegut Jr. is a speaker of enormous wit
and charm. His novels include Cat's Cradle,
Slaughterhouse-Five, Happy Birthday
Wanda Jane, Breakfast of Champions, and
Galapagos.
Tues., Oct. 280* 8:00 p.m.
Hill Auditorium
Tickets are now available atTicketworld in the
______________Michigan Union and at Hudson's. $10, $8, $5.
9Hll Street (Visa/MasterCard: 763-8587) GreatWriters
1429 HSeries tickets are available at Hillel. Phone
663-3336 663-3336 formore information.

f l '
®:~

Hey, couldn't you benefit from
learning to read and study more
efficiently and effectively? Take

SPEED READING & STUDY SKILLS
*Reading Speed and Comprehension
*Time Management
*Test Preparation
*Note-taking
Registration: October 22-23 at
-The Reading & Learning Skills Center (8:30-4)
-The Academic Resource Center, in the
Undergraduate Library, 2nd floor (2-5)
For more information please call:

Reading
&Learning
SkillsrCenter

/ ,T pF
U.x4.

1610 Washtenaw
(near Hill St.)
Ph. 763-7195

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OFFICE
ENCOURAGES STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF UNIVERSITY POLICY
TO BE FAMILIAR WITH THE UNIVERSITY POLICY ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT
ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND WITH THE STATEMENT
RECENTLY RELEASED BY THE FACULTY SENATE ASSEMBLY It is the policy of The University of Michigan that no member of the Uni-
ON GENDER AND RESPECT IN THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY. versity community may sexually harass another. any employee or student will
be subject to disciplinary action for violation of this policy.
Sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical
For Your Information the Affirmative Action Office conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when -
Is Providing the Following Important Excerpts 1. submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a
From The President's Statement on Sexual Harassment term or condition of an individual's employment or education;
And the Faculty Statement in Its Entirety.
2. submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as
the basis for academic or employment decisions affecting that individual;
FACULTY STATEMENT ON GENDER AND RESPECT 3. such conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering
IN THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY with an individual's academic or professional performance or creating an in-
timidating, hostile or offensive employment, education, or living environment.
sibilities regarding students. We share with these adult students, and contribute substantially harassment is illegal under both state and federal law. In some cases,
to, an important period in their intellectual and professional growth. When they are our co- it may be susceptible to prosecution under the criminal sexual conduct law.
workers, as teaching and research assistants or junior colleagues in research and scholarship,
we are simultaneously responsible for them and dependent upon them.
The relationship between faculty and adult students, however complex it may be, is
ultimately and structurally assymmetrical. Like any professional relationship, it rests upon IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS OR CONCERNS ABOUT
a special form of trust and reciprocal respect. Sexual relationships between faculty mem-IFY UH V Q ES ON ORC C R SAB T
bers and students risk diminishing or even voiding this trust and respect to the detriment of SEXUAL HARASSMENT OR ABOUT HOW THIS
all. Moreover, the asymmetry of this relationship means that any sexual relationship be-
tween a faculty member and a student is potentially exploitative and should be avoided. POLICY AND STATEMENT AFFECT YOU ...
Sexual interactions between faculty and students may be characterized variously as
coercive, offensive or consenting. Any attention paid to an individual which suggests thatSao,,
his or her grade or other evaluation will be influenced by sexual activity is coercive and STUDENTS may attend the Tell Someone workshop being offered as part of
cannot be condoned. We are particularly concerned with such practices since they under- Sexual Assault Awareness Days on Thursday, October 30, from 2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
mine the professional trust upon which the faculty-student relationship is founded and clearly in the Pond Room of the Michigan Union. No registration is necessary; no fee is
conflict with University Policy. charged.
Similarly, we oppose offensive or derogatory treatment of individuals or groups of stu-
dents based on their gender. Behavior which stigmatizes in this way is a violation of the GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING ASSISTANTS may register for the free
respect with which we are all obliged to treat each other. Including salacious remarks or workshop on "Student-Teacher Relationships" being offered by the Affirmative
illustrations in lectures, or consistently inviting comments or opinions from members of rkhAction Office and CRLT on Monday, October 27, from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. at
one gender more than the other are two examples. Likewise, overly insistent attention toAcinOfeadCRToMnayOtbr27fom30to50pm.t
the personal espects of a student's life demonstrates an offensive disregard for the personal CRLT. Call CRLT at 764-0505.
autonomy of students. Expecially difficult is the problem of what might appear on the
surface to be a consenting sexual relationship. Because of the asymmetry of the faculty- fTAFF mam, y ,-r1 asbyn -in. d.n nth"TP11 n. w-e nn ..f. e+ n

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