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October 23, 1986 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Vol. XCV I - - No. 36 c
School
board,
rejects
C linics
By EVE BECKER
The Ann Arbor Board of
Education last night rejected a
proposal to apply for a grant to set
up health care clinics-which could
have included dispensing birth
,ontrol prescriptions-for teens in
Ann Arbor public schools.
Around 75 Ann Arbor residents,
mostly parents, appeared at the
board meeting to object to their
children receiving birth control
information from the schools.
University Medical School Prof.
Inta Ertel presented the school board
with the idea of providing clinics for
teens in either Huron or Pioneer
High Schools. The clinics would
have been staffed by University
pediatrics interns.
ERTEL SAYS ,she will
continue her efforts to improve
adolescent health care, and the board
agreed to discuss the issue with her.
She had wanted to gain the
school board's approval to make
application by the Nov. 1 deadline
for a six-year grant of $600,000
from The Robert Wood Johnson
Foundation, a national organization
which promotes the school-based
adolescent health care clinics. There
are 50 such clinics nationwide, with
three in Michigan.
The clinics would treat common
and serious illnesses and offer
physical examinations. Services
would also include "effective
preventive services aimed at
pregnancy and sexually transmitted
diseases and other high-risk con-
ditions, such as injuries and drug
and alcohol abuse."
Parental consent for use of the
clinic would be required at the
See BOARD, Page _.

C I
be

II 43UU
Ninety-seven years of editorialfreedom

IEItI

opyright 1986, The Michigan Doily

Ann Arbor, Michigan - Thursday, October 23, 1986

Ten Pages

a--

Diplomats
expelled
Embassy staff is cut

MOSCOW (AP)-The Soviet
Union yesterday ordered five more
American diplomats to leave the
country in retaliation for what a
foreign ministry spokesman called
"anti-Soviet actions," by the United
States.
The spokesman, Gennady
Gerasimov, also announced the
ordered withdrawal of 260 maids,
drivers, and other Soviet workers
who handle the U.S. Embassy's
daily non-diplomatic operations.
His announcement brought to
ten the number of American
diplomats ordered to leave the
country.
GERASIMOV said the Soviet
Union also was imposing new
restrictions on the U.S. Embassy in
Moscow and the consulate in
Leningrad, including limits on
visas for temporary assignments.

The move came one day after the
United States ordered the expulsion
of 55 Soviet diplomats, five of
them in direct retaliation for the
Kremlin order expelling five
American diplomats in the Soviet
Union, and 50 to reduce the overall
size of the Soviet Embassy in
Washington and the consulate in
San Francisco.
Gerasimov said the United States
will not be allowed to use third-
country nationals to replace the
Soviet workers, and can bring
Americans in to fill their secre -
tarial, custodial, and driving jobs
only within the overall limits on
embassy staff.
HE ALSO said the number of
Americans at the embassy in
Moscow and the Leningrad
consulate will be held to the U.S.-
See SOVIETS, Page 2

Daily Photo by JOHN MUNSON
Don't eat on it
Louise Pieper and Rolland Frey admire a reupholstered couch that Frey delivered from Advance Interiors to
the Kempf House Center for Local History. Pieper is the Staff Director of the Ann Arbor Historic District
Commission. The house, located at 312 S. Division, is being restored to the 1850's Greek Revival look it had
when the Kempfs owned it. The house contains an 1875 Steinway piano, the first grand piano in Ann Arbor.

Forum hi hlts
By MARTIN FRANK 85 percent over the last six years. She said th
Several students and faculty members last rule should be extended to include classifi
night urged the University to maintain a research and research done for outsi
clause prohibiting classified research that companies.
could result in the destruction of human life, Kock said defense department contrac
but others said the so-called "end-use" clause with the University "move out of research th
is ambiguous and impinges on the rights of will help humans and promote an arms ra
researchers. that can kill humans."
Speaking at the first of three forums on the PH Y SIC S Prof. Daniel Axelrod sai
University's proposed research guidelines, "The University and engineering departme
LSA senior Ingrid Kock said defense are already in too deep in dependence upon t
department research at the University-which defense department.".
is limited by the end-use claise-has increased Axelrod believes that the end-use clau

research
he should be retained as well as the revie
ed committees that currently oversee the curre
de guidelines-the Research Policies Committ(
and the Classified Review Panel. Under tt
ts proposed guidelines, these committees wou
at be eliminated.
ce
The end-use clause prohibits research th
d, can kill or maim human beings. The end-us
;nt clause currently applies to the classifie
he research guidelines, but it has been delete
from proposed guidelines by both the majori
se and the minority reports of the committ

guidelines
w which reviewed the current guidelines.
nt
ee _ The reports, submitted by University
he President Harold Shapiro's ad hoc committee
ld last July, are being reviewed by various
groups on campus, such as the Michigan
Student Assembly and the faculty's Senate
at Advisory Committee on University Affairs.
se Their recommendations are due by the end of
d the fall semester, and the Board of Regents is
d expected to vote on the proposal at its
ty meeting in January.
ee .See 'U', Page 5

NewU11
lounge to
welcome
snack ers
By KEVIN GRAY
Chronic snackers who like to
munch at the Undergraduate Library
will no longer have to hide soda
cans under backpacks and pretzel
bags in notebooks. By the end of
the semester, they will be able to
use the new UGLi lounge.
The lounge will boast several
soda, sandwiches, candy, and snack
, machines, coffee pots, "modular"
furniture, study tables, and new
wallpaper. The lounge will be ready
once the library gets specially fitted
gratings to lock the vending
machines at night,
Library officials had hoped the
new lounge would open in
September, but time constraints
made that impossible, according to
Barbara MacAdam, an associate
/librarian who is in charge of the
redecoration.
The new lounge will be open
during regular library hours, but the
machines will only be available
from late afternoon until
"sometime at night." A monitor
will be on duty at those times to
guard the machines from vandals
and keep the area neat.
"Staff funding is not available to

Socialist gov.
hopeful seeks
labor support

Daily Photo by JOHN MUNSON
By the end of the semester, the first floor Undergraduate Library lounge will boast modular furniture, new
wallpaper, and vending machines. The new lounge will be open during regular library hours and will enable
students to eat legally in the UGLi once again.

By STEPHEN GREGORY
Workers League gubernatorial
candidate Martin McLaughlin says
his campaign is geared more toward
amassing support for the formation
of a labor party than to further his
own political career.
Election
'86
McLaughlin, a socialist, was a
University student and 1969
president of the Student
Government Council-the
precursor of today's Michigan
Student Assembly-said that if he
wins a significant number of votes
in the November election, it will
mean "there is a growing discontent
with the choices presented by the
two-party system."
"I don't believe there is any
significant difference between the
two parties," he said. "They're both
big business parties."
McLaughlin slammed both Gov.
James Blanchard's and Republican

candidate William Lucas'
campaigns. He said their common
promise to bring more businesses
to Michigan clashes with labor
interests.
RICK WEINER, Chairman of
the Michigan Democratic Party,
refused to even consider

keep the machines open all day,"
MacAdam explained.
The idea of an UGLi lounge is.
not a new idea. In 1985 University
administrators eliminated a previous
lounge, located on the UGLi's
fourth floor, to use the room "more
practically" as a microcomputing
center.
Since then students have been
without an actual lounge, although

they have been allowed to use the
vacant area across from the front
desk.
The issue of establishing a new
lounge was brought before the Uni-
versity Library Council in October
1985, shortly after the decision to
eliminate the old one. Vice
President for Student Services
Henry Johnson approved the new

lounge plan last February.
Smoking will be prohibited in
the lounge because of recent
University guidelines restricting
smoking in public places. In the
past, smoking was allowed in the
entire basement of the library, but
due to the restrictions it is now
only permitted in room eight of
the basement.

McLaughlin
... hopes for support for
third party
McLaughlin's criticisms. "I'm not
going to respond on what a third
party candidate might say," he said.
"The real election here is between
Jim Blanchard and Bill Lucas."
See FORMER, Page 5

TODAY
Sidewalk math
E ven during midterms week, some students
fmnn sxnndc~dprie totn n -~ an,-1 rhnt nn the Dine

with a sign saying 'Sidewalk Math.' It was like
someone answered my prayers," said Aronow.
David Burkam, a Math 115 TA, said the Diag
approach is a good way to make students feel
comfortable asking for help. "There isn't that
power-grade problem that you have with office
hours. It's easier to come up to some random

come to them. The Pumpkin Brigade, made up of
crews of high school students, expects to deliver
about 400,000 pounds of jack-o'-lantern and pie
makings to doorsteps across the valley be next
weekend. The "Great Pumpkin Giveaway," which
got under way last weekend, is the promotional
brainchild of real estate entrepreneur Mike

INSIDE
MANIPULATION:Opinion clls for a ban on
covert CIA activity. See Page 4.
REVISION: Arts reviews Game Theory's

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