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October 17, 1986 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-10-17

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ARTS

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,The Michigan Daily

Friday, October 17, 1986

Page 8

R.C. Players tune in to
T.V. for the shock of it

I

By Karin Edelson

This weekend the Residential
College Players will open their
season with a production of "T.V.
a short, one act play which
parodies the various effects that
y television has on viewers' lives.
C T.V. was written in 1966 by
Jean-Claude VanItallie and is part of
a trilogy of plays entitled America
Hurrah. The R. C. Players

performed the first two parts of this
trilogy last yefar and decided that it
was time for completion.
Director, Nancy Bishop, an
R.C. and theatre junior, explains
that T.V. was chosen by the R.C.
Players because it has a great deal
of impact gn American society. It
shows how constant viewers
develop an apathetic attitude toward
pressing world issues because they
are continuously bombarded with-

UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD
MODERN BRITISH STUDIES
Through Boston University, study for one semester at St.
Catherine's College, one of 35 colleges that make up University
of Oxford. Courses are in modern British history, literature, and
politics, taught on-site by Oxford faculty. Students have full
privileges at St. Catherine's College. Applicants need at least a
"B" average.
Information and applications:
NAME
ADDRESS_
CITY STATE ZIP_
Return to: MBS, 143 Bay State Rd., Boston, MA 02215 (617)353-9888
BOSTON UNIVERSITY OX12

depressing statics. It also asks the
question; do we imitate television
or does it imitate us?
The play consists of two sets of
actors. The first set is employed by
a television ratings company and is
asked to view shows over and over
to test their reactions. The second
set of actors show the audience
what is being shown on the TV.
Black and white slides are also
projected behind the actors
throughout the entire production.
The theatre group aims to
present plays that offer more than
pure entertainment. They are often
somewhat political, bringing about
public awareness and motivation.
Bishop explains that "T.V. is
important because people do watch
too much TV, but they may not
realize what an impact it has on
their lives.
This off-beat comedy will be
presented in the East Quad
Auditorium on Friday and Saturday
nights at 8 p.m. and on Sunday at 3
p.m. Tickets are available at the
door for $2.00 and East Quad
residents will be admitted for free
on Friday night.

San Francisco mime troupe:
America's oldest and best known political theater collective, will take Ann Arbor by storm Saturday night with
their newest play, 'The Mozamgola Caper.' Far from silent, this musical comedy spy-thriller set in a post-
revolutionary African nation explodes with political insight enlivened by plenty of Afro-American and African-
inspired music and dance. It's political theater at its best! Saturday, October 18 at 8 p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn

-I

Theatre. For ticket information, call 763-TKTS.

Records

Fairport Convention
HOUSE FULL
Hannibal
On the heels of the new Fairport
Convetion's visit to Ann Arbor, we
have a glimpse at a classic Fairport
line-up.
Fairport went through its first
great change of personnel in 1969
when Sandy Denny and Ashley
Hutchings quit. With the death of.
drummer Martin Lamble, only

Richard Thompson and Simon
Nicol remained from the original
crew.
Dave Swarbrick, already well
established in the band, recom -
mended drummer Dave Mattacks
and bassist Dave Pegg as new band
members and the second great
Fairport line-up was born.
But a funny thing happened (at
least according to producer Joe
Boyd's liner notes). In spite of all
the talent that line-up had, it never

The Center for Japanese Studies Presents

Vi;A s
mi

WINNER OF THE
BEST FILM AWARD
in Japan in 1983.

. -OMMO"

cathing deadpan corned,
ddle class and its obsessic

THE CRITICS ARE EATING IT UP!...
-Vincent Canby, New York Times
"WICKEDLY FUNNY! 'The Family Game' is so rich that Mr. Morita
would seem to be one of the most talented and original of Japan's new
filmmakers....a visual adventure:'
-Richard Freedman, Newhouse Newspapers
"* * * * A BEGUILING CHARMINGLY ECCENTRIC COMEDY:'
-Stephen Schaefer, Us Magazine
"Challenging comedy blends wry criticism with tenderness, hope and
DAFFY HUMOR:'
-J. Hoberman, village voice
"FUNNY AND ENERGETIC RIGHT DOWN TO ITS'THREE STOOGES'
FINALE:'
-William Wolf, Gannett Newspapers
"** ** VERY FUNNY...a striking contemporary comedy'
-Kathleen Carroll, Daily News
"A DELICIOUSLY WRY COMEDY:'
-Joseph GelmisNewsday
"* * ** A SUBVERSIVE SCREWBALL COMEDY reminiscent of
'Zero For Conduct'...one of the most bizarre slapstick finales of any
comedy in recent memory. Full of marvelous secrets and evocative
humor that ricochets around in the mind after one leaves the theatre:'

about Japan's affluent
n with success.
FRIDAY,
October 17
Admission:
FREE
7-9p.m.
Japanese with
English subtitles
AUDITORIUM A
Angell Hall
Call 764-6307
for further information
In conjunction with
Professor Edward's
Japan Through Film class.

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS PRESENT

WAITING FOR THE PARADE

adequately presented itself in record
form. The one album it did release,
Full House, (again, according t9
Boyd) was good but not greaw,
Before the next album came out,
Thompson had left the band. Th
live tracks comprising Housi
Full were never widely released.
It's wrong of Boyd to suggest
that Full House was not a
fantastic album. While it may be
correct that some'of his unused
suggestions could have improved it,
it nevertheless remains outstanding.
House Full, measured against
that album, comes out even. The
precision (and ironically, fine
production) of the studio album are
traded for new power and spon -
taneity on the live album. Where
the vocal work is probably stronger
from the studio, Swarbrick's violin
is neverlivelier thanwhen it is in
front of an appreciative audience.
Without quibbling then, it's
clear House Full is a superb
release in itself. It does, not, as
Boyd argues, redefine that great
Fairport line-up, but it does offer
up some great music. If you're a
Fairport fan, you shouldn't go
without one or the other of the two;
if you're a legitimate addict then
depict sensitive details which de-
scribe Detroit homes like his own.
While in Brittany, Kahn moved
away from usual patterns to other
methods of conveying works. After
intense studies and sketching
throughout Europe as a student,
Kahn's growing abilities as an art-
ist emerged. Later works developed
out of his transition into a mature
craftsman. Dramatic changes are
expressed in chronological order in
the exhibit, as he travels from Italy
to France, Germany, and Belgium.
The rust and black colored grease
pencils used in the fall of1891 add
heavy lines to Kahn's sketches.
Prompted by a new awareness of
his strengths as an artist, the shift
symbolizes the growth as an artist
and man. Kahn's confidence is
clearly conveyed through these
sketches, as is his superior talent.
These journeys, which gave him
the opportunity for inward growth
and expansion, also contribute to
the world of art.
See RECORDS, Page 9
LIBERAL ARTS
MAJORS...
You're Needed
... A _ .

By John Murrell

Directed by Patricia Boyette

October 16, 17 at 8:00 p.m.
October 18 at 5:00 p.m. & 9:00 p.m.
October 19 at 2:00 p.m.
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE (State St. at Huron)
"In WAITING FOR THE PARADE, the audience is invited to share
the lives of five women, as each survives, in her own way, the se-
cond World War at home in Canada. The tragedy of the war is
there, of course, but also a lot of humor and comradeship. "
Maryhelen Vicars
The Edmonton Journal
Ticket $5 General Admission $3 students
League Ticket Office, 764-0450 Mon.-Fri. 10-5
Tickets also available 1 hour before curtain at door.

The Office of Major Events presents
THEIPSYCH iUEiCnrFUn
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UNION

Arts

&

Programming

This Week at the Michigan Union...

Oct. 14-25

Sculpture Pools & Riverworks
An exhibit of the works of Palline Plum
lOam-5pm
Room 1209

_
C
,
C
C
.
.
S
_C
C
_
.
i +

Oct. 19 & 26 Rag Rug Weaving Workshop
Amy Ticknor, instructor
1 lam-4:30pm
$40 tuition, $24 materials

All Over the
World.
Ask Peace Corps volunteers why
their ingenuity and flexibility are
as viral as their degrees. They'll
tell you they are helping the
world's poorest peoples attain
self sufficiency in the areas of food
production, energy conservation,
arii jrrntinn orn..i

Oct. 23

"The Complexities of Oedipus"
Discussion with John Russell Brown,
Artistic Director of Project Theatre
12:15pm
Pendleton Room

I

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