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October 08, 1986 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-10-08

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 8, 1986 - Page 3

Nicaragua Survivor identified
CIA agent lives through shoot-down

MANAGUA, Nicaragua'
(AP)-An american who survived
when Sandinista soldiers shot down aI
cargo plane said yesterday he is an
aviation specialist who boarded the
C-123 in El Salvador.
Nicaraguan officials have claimed
Eugene Hasenfus, 45, of Marinette,
Wisconsin is an American military
adviser serving in El Salvador and the
transport shot down Sunday in
southern Nicaragua was carrying
weapons ammunition to rebels
fighting the leftist Sandinistas.
Officials in Washington denied
any connection between Hasenfus and
the U. S. government.
Hasenfus was allowed to speak to
local journalists briefly in San
Carlos, a port on Lake Nicaragua
near the crash site. He said the plane
began its journey in Miami, picked
him up in El Salvador, then took a
Nicaraguan aboard in Honduras and

entered Nicaraguan air space from
Costa Rica at a site known as La
Noca on the San Juan River.
According to Hasenfus, the
Nicaraguan was one of three men
killed in the crash.
It was not clear from the
American's brief remarks whether he+
was a military man or a civilian.
Nicaraguan army officers who
accompanied Hasenfus said the other
two men killed were Americans they
identified as Wallace Blaine Sawger"
Jr. and Bill Cooper. Their
hometowns were not available.
Nicaragua had said initially that
all three dead men were Americans.
The bodies were said to be in bad
condition and still at the crash site in
a remote jungle area north of the San
Juan River, which helicopters had
difficulty in reaching because of poor
weather.
Sandinista officials said the plane

was shot down with a Soviet-made
surface-to-air missile at a spot 35
miles north of Costa Rica and 91
miles southeast of Managua.
The helicopters that picked
Hasenfus up at the crash site were
based at Juigalpa, about 60 miles
east of Managua and 65 miles
northwest of the crash site near the
village of El Tule.
The Defense Ministry said the
downed plane carried 50,000 rounds
of ammunition for Soviet-made AK-
47 rifles, rocket-propelled grenades,
dozens of automatic rifles, jungle
boots and other military supplies.
Secretary of State George Shultz
said in Washington that the plane did
not belong to the U. S. government,
and a CIA spokeswoman denied
Sandinista claims that the survivor.
was an employee of the intelligence
agency.
Shultz told reporters the aircraft

"wasn't an American cargo plane" but
was hired by "private people,"
including Americans. He did not
name the people,
"I don't know where he is and
what he's doing," Hasenfus' wife,
Sally, said in a telephone interview.
"I only know what I see on the TV,
too, and I really don't know any
more."
However, David Holliday,
spokesman for the Senate
Intelligence Committee, said Sally
Hasenfus had called the State
Department
"and said her husband worked for
CIA." And I. W. Stephenson, a
retired pilot and aviation executive,
said Hasenfus told him 20 years ago
that he was going to work in
Vietnam for Air America, then a CIA
proprietary corporation.

Associated Press

Eugene Hasenfus, (right) is believed to be the lone survivor of an
American-based cargo plane that was shot down in Nicaragua Sunday.
;Hasenfus is shown with his brother William in an undated family photo.

Health foods aren't
always healthful

11

I

- - - -' - -

Campus Cinema
Free Voice Of Labor: The
Jewish Anarchists (S.
Fischler & J. Sucher, 1980), Alt
Act, DBL/7:30 p.m., EQ126.
Documentary
about...well... Jewish anarchists.
Anarchism In America
(Steven Fischler & Joe Sucher,
1982), Alt Act, DBL/8:30 p.m.,
EQ126.
From Sacco and Vanzetti to
Jello Biafra.
The Glen Miller Story (A.
Mann, 1954), MTF, 7:45 p.m.,
Mich.
Jimmy Stewart stars as the
bandleader, the legend, the air-
crash fatality.
The Godfather (Francis Ford
Coppola, 1972), Hill St., 8
pm., Hill St.,
The life of Vito Corleone and
his Mafia family is documented
in one of the greatest American
films ever made. Marlon Brando,
Al Pacino, James Caan, Diane
Keaton, Robert Duvall.
The Fountainhead (King
Vi1or, 1949), AAFC, 7 & 9:05
p.m., MLB 3.
Ayn Rand's conservative
philosophy is expounded in the
story of an architect who will
settle for nothing less than
perfection from himself. Gary
Cooper.
Performances
Organ recitals-School of
Music, 11 a.m. & 8:30 p.m.,
Hill Auditorium.
Organ recital-School of
Music, 3 p.m., First Baptist
Church, 512 E. Huron.
Speakers
Janet Giele-"The Changing
Life Patterns of Educated
Women, 1910-1980," School of
Education, 4 p.m., Tribute
Room, 1322 School of
Education Bldg.
Jay Callahan-"Depression
and Suicide," Catherine
McAuley Health Center, 7 p.m.,
Mercywood Health Building.
Robert Haselkorn- "Rear-
rangement of Anabaena Nitro-
gen-fixation Genes During Het-
erocyst Differentiation," Divis-
ion of Biological Sciences, 4
p.m., MLB 2.
Anatoly Khazanov - "Con-
temporary Soviet Anthro-
pology," noon, Lane Hall
Commons.
Anatoly Khazanov-"No-
mads and Pastoralists in the
Past, Present, and Future," An-
thropology and Classical Studies
departments, Center for Russian
and East European Studies, 4
p.m., 2009 Angell.
John Deely-"Selecting the
Best Treatment: Non-bayesian
and Bayesian Approaches,"
Deparment of Statistics, 4 p.m.,
451 Mason.

Room, Frieze Bldg.
J. Osborn-"AIDS: Five
Years and Counting," School of
Dentistry, 4 p.m., G390
Dentistry Bldg.
S. Braun-"Identification of
Structural Parameters by
Overdetermination," 4 p.m.,
1017 Dow Bldg.
P. Gulyas-"Tandem Mass
Spectrometry and its
Applications in Chemistry,"
Chemistry Department, 4
p.m.,1200 Chemistry Bldg.
K. Jung-"Mitomycines:
Chemical Mechanism of
Activation," Chemistry Depart-
ment, 4 p.m., 1300 Chemistry
Bldg.
rMeetings
International Business
Club-5:15 p.m., K1310
Kresge Bldg.
Michigan Gay Union-9
p.m., Guild House, 802
Monroe.
Science Fiction Club,
Stilyagi Air Corps-8:30
p.m., Michigan League Con-
ference Rooms.
Outing Club-Mass meeting,
8 p.m., 1209 Union.
Committee on Ethics and
Humanism in Medicine -
Mass meeting, 6 p.m., 126 East
Quad.
Furthermore

By ELLEN FIEDELHOLTZ
Foods free of chemical pre-
servatives that have not been
stripped of their nutrients are better
for you, but "health foods" don't
H eal th
Fi'tziess
always fit that formula, according
to a local nutritionist.
James Coats, the vitamin
consultant at Seva market on
Liberty Street, said many people
have misconceptions about how
healthy "health foods" actually are.
In other words, 100 percent natural
doesn't necessarily mean 100

percent healthy.
"CAROB CANDY is candy.
It has sugar and the same
hydrogenated fats found in choc-
olate," Coats said.
At the Ariel Health Food story
on Maynard Street, students and
senior citizens make up most of the
clientele. "The students usually
grab one of the trail mixes," said
store employee Lisa Kilburn. "The
nuts and fruit are a good quick
snack." But are they good for you?
Coats agreed that trail mix is
better than a Snickers bar, but he
called it simply "less of a bad
thing." Many trail mixes and other
bulk foods that students reach for
are high in calories, but despite
this, the bulk items turn over very
quickly. Granola, one of the staples
of health food stores, is
See NATURAL, Page 8

Janis Michael-Phototype-
setting and the Autologic Micro-
5 Typesetter, 3 p.m., 1013
NUBS. Registration required,
747-2424.
Career Planning and
Placement-"The Medical
School Interview," 4:10 p.m.,
3200 Student Activities Bldg.
Career Planning and
Placement-"Preparing for the
Second Interview (Call
Back/Plant Visit)," 4:10 p.m.,
3200 Student Activites Bldg.
Society of Women
Engineers-Pre-interviews, 7
p.m., 1024 East Engineering
Bldg.
University Activities Cen-
ter--Soph show auditions, 6:30
p.m., Anderson Room,Union.
School of Art-Video,
Art/New York, interviews with
Hans Namuth, Cindy Sherman,
and Robert Rauschenberg,
photography exhibitions, 5:30
p.m., 2216-19 School of Art
Auditorium.
MicrocomputerEducation
Center-Workshops: Basic
Concepts of Programming,
10:30 a.m., 4003 School of
Education Bldg.; Lotus 1-2-3,
Part II, 8:30 a.m.; VersaTerm,
10:30 a.m., 3001 School of
Education Bldg.
CRLT-Workshop, S. Balius,
"Using Bibliographic
'h " 7 n m

CLASSES STARTING
IN OCTOBER
203 E. Hoover 662-3149
CALL DAYS.,EVENINGS &WEEKENDS
- WEM AMI. CENTECMLTD.
TESTPREMRAToNSPECIALIS SSINCE 1938
The
Ambassador Program
Needs You!
VOLUNTEER FOR MINORITY
RECRUITMENT ACTIVITIES
* Campus Visits
" Phone Contacts
" High School Visits
" Special Projects
SIGN UP TODAY!
Undergraduate Admissions
Office
1220 SAB
Applications Taken Until Nov. 1
Oktoberfest
WIl LADEN SIE HERZLICHST EIN
vom 13.Okt. bis 17.Okt. 1986
Oktoberfest first began in 1810 as a 16-day festival, which ran from late September
to early Oktober, to celebrate the up-coming wedding of Crown Prince Ludwig
of Bavaria.
Oktoberfestivities ... begin at 7:00 p.m. through 10:00 p.m.
BOOT EATING - CHOCOLATE CAKE EATING - SUPER
SLURPER SUCKER CONTEST - CREATIVE CARVING CONTEST -
GERMAN TRIVIA CONTEST.
Be our Oktoberfest guest and join our Oktoberfeast.
German music, German food. .. Und eine wunderbare Zeit
FOOD - BEER - PRIZES
LIMITED EDITION T-SHIRTS - OKTOBERFEST STEINS
FRANKENMUTH DINNERS - GIFT CERTIFICATES
St. Pauli Girl & Hacker Pschorr
Mosel and Rhine Wines All Schnapps on special
Knackwurst mit Sauerkraut - Hot German Potato Saled -
Warm Bavarian Pumpernickel Bread w/Butter - Bratwurst

Daily Photo by PETER ROSS
Jars of health food line the shelves of a local cooperative.
HEALTH & FITNESS
Reflections on Beauty V-
Achieving Beauty Through Education
Special Image and
Health programs
available for your
group or organization.
" Xia Fashion collec-
tions for active and FULL PRIVILEGE
professional women. ADULT MEMBERSHIPS
" Evening presentation WHICH INCLUDE
available for sororities
and other groups NAUTILUS CLUB-
interested.
color analysis ONLY $290 PER YEAR
" therapeutic European PRESENT THIS AD AND
facials and
care clinic. si SA VE 2
* wardrobe building. Good thru Oct. 31, 1986
Sandi Mackrill, Image Consultant ANN ARBOR "Y"
Kerrytown " 2nd Floor " Ann Arbor 3505S. FIFTH AVE.
(313)994-0448 * (313)994-4424 663536
GET YOUR ACT TOGETHER!
Relaxers
HiLites // d
Haircuts NA
CareFree 555 EastWiliam
Tower Plaza - Suite 10G
Ann Arbo .Ml48104
FREE 8 OZ. SHAMPOO39
(with service)
WHY IS INSIGHT
THE BEST SEMINAR
AVAILABLE TODAY?
If you want more will be happy to answer
love, toy, confidence, any questions you might
happiness and success in , have, give you
your life- you can have information about
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much more! Insight has and familiarize you with
developed heartfelt, our Gift of Giving
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life more effectively, ranging in age from 18 to Call 313063-6890
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an educational format throughout the United

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