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October 06, 1986 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-10-06

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ARTS
Monday, October 6, 1986

The Michigan Daily

Page 7

. ......... . . . ........ ........

Players len

sparkle
B McCannhis innocens
By Brian McHreben's.
Doonesbury, the 1983 Garry overdone, ye
Trudeau/ Elizabeth Swardos musical Coupled with
is mildly entertaining and even fun Honey was
sometimes. But it's not great- playing the
and the fault lies in Trudeau's very quietly,
contrived script and Swardos' comic timin
unmemorable music rather than the has a delica
performance by the University's Honey's fulla
Musical Theater Program. With The Wald
seemingly effortless zeal and well. Gill
profound talents, the company of burned out
Doonesbury should have been Koenig's du
given a tighter vehicle to showcase wonderfully
themselves. Robin Robin
The muscial comedy takes place ergetic Boop
of the eve of the Walden gang's following B.
college graduation. At the same cheerleader(
time, recreational drug enthusiast Florida foot
Duke is establishingda court ordered James create
drug rehabilitation center on the with a stro
Walden property with the help of beautiful v
his devoted maoist Girl Friday, underplay th
Honey. In just over two hours, out the tig
there is fear of the future, despair performanc
over employment, a shy boy loves Sharon Rosi
girl situation, and a bitter mother- the title chara
daughter battle to come to terms Director7
with before the final curtain. to save the
Doonesbury's strengths are direction an
the characters Trudeau followers in the Trueb
have come to know over the past setting. Th
decade. All of the undergraduate without any
actor's characterizations were good, David Leugs
and got to the heart of personifying greens, and
a cartoon and playing it larger than furnitureo
life. Strongest in the eleven person cartoonishr
ensemble was Ty Hreben's maniac Eileen Con
uncle Duke who plans to turn orchestra, h
Walden into condos instead of the was on ta
rehabilitation center. Hreben gave a modulated.'
colorful performance, gritting his that the po
teeth with cigarette holder while Trueblood d
possessing a fine voice, especially musical thea
in his first act plea to the court for songs were1

to'Doone

e, "Guilty."
Duke was justifiably
t never out of control.
[h him, Andrea Langs'
also right on target,
shuffling Girl Friday
with a subtle sense of
g. Miss Langs also
te voice she used to
advantage.
den gang fares just as
es Chiasson as the
Zonker and Kipp
umb jock B.D. were
cartoonish, as was
nson's wide-eyed en -
psie, who dreams of
D. to pro-football as a
(a "Tampette" for the
tball team). Hilary
d a quiet, sensitive J.J.
ong stage presence,
nice, and a sense to
e character. Rounding
ght cast were good
es by Paul Martinez,
n, and Gary Adler as
acter.
Tim Millett tried hard
show with his robust
d snappy choreography
blood Theater's thrust
z action flowed freely
focus problems on
;s' preppy set of pinks,
d lilacs. Even the
overemphasized the
nature of the show.
ndon's four person
idden behind the set,
arget and perfectly
The only trouble was
aor acoustics of the
.oes not lend itself to
ater. Many words of
lost, even with actors

only a few feet in front of the
audience.
The strength of the Musical
Theater Program's production is
found in the concept of what an
ensemble show is. All eleven

sbury'
actors worked onstage as a team,
bringing unified enjoyment and
enthusiasm to the production.
Doonesbury's last perfor-
mance begins tonight at 8 p.m. at
the Trueblood Theater.

T{
SPA CES
STILL A VAILADLE
BALLROOM DANCE
BEER APPRECIATION
FINANCIAL PLANNING
WINETASTING
(Section I1)
Register NOW at the UAC offices.
$2 late-registration fee.

REGISTER NOW!

763 1107

Photo by DOUG MCMAHON
The University Musical Theatre Program presents their last performan-
ce of 'Doonesbury' tonight at the Trueblood Theatre. Showtime starts at 8
p.m.

WDET Welcomes to the Power Center
October Blues Fest!
JOHN LEE JOHN ELVIN
HOOKER HAMMOND BISHOP
and PINETOP PERKINS

Txhibit displayed at Rackham

Thursday, October 16, 7:30 p.m.

By Karen Josefsberg
The Ann Arbor Women Painters
is currently presenting the 35th
Annual Exhibition through October
10th. The artwork, -depicting a
variety of scenes from oceans to
forests, boats to flowers, and shells
to petals, is on display at the
Rackham Galleries. The abundance
of talent and the wealth of creativity
which is evident in the works make.
this a truly spectacular exhibit.
The abilities of the artists
displayed range from novice
.painters who are showing their
artwork for the first time, to
national painters who have already
won acclaim., Multiple artistic
possibilities and interests provide a
dynamic array of styles and
technique. Further symbolic mean -
ings develop from the serious, yet
simple works of this showing.

Barry Avedon, Professor of Art
at Eastern Michigan University
says, "The work in this exhibition
interests me because of the balance
between sincerity and technique."
Certian works that appear soft and
serene may take on a whole other
meaning. The exhibit as a whole
presents extreme diversity not only
in talent, but in its wide range of
possibilities for means of ex -
pression.
The exhibit's Best of Show
Award has been given to Barbara
Moline for her still life "Coffee
Break." This interesting and some -
what complex oil painting shows
what appears to be an ordinary,
average coffee break; however, the
painting is truly deserving of its
merits, as it creates in the minds of
viewers the actual event of a coffee
break with its traditional items. It
lacks nothing in detail, which

places it in its own, category.
"Coffee Break" is a fine example of
the genuine craftmanship and skill
of the artists shown in the exhibit.
Other works deserve con -
sideration for artistic ability and
presentation. Donna Zagotta re -
ceived the Grumbacher Award for
her fabulously diverse and lively
,watercolor painting, "Detroit's
Greektown at Night." The work
describes what one sees in the well
known area which is famous for its
authentic nightlife and food. The
work, powerful in its representation
of Detroit's Greek area, forces those
who have not yet experienced the
source of the painting to do so at
once. Its workmanship is truly
inviting and appealing to artgoers
of all levels.
Other works that received awards
for merit and honorable mention are
also on display. The selection of

paintings, providing an enormous
amount of colors, images, and
designs, are currently on sale, too.
They are enjoyable pieces of
artwork which provide excitement
and quality while showing a diverse
selection of settings and skills.
Says Avedon, "I was very pleased
with the high level of water based
paintings. In fact, there were so
rpany fine watercolors that it was
the most difficult area to narrow
down because of space limitations."
The third floor of Rackham Hall
houses the exhibits from 9 a.m. to
6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and
from 10a.m. to 3p.m. on Sat -
urdays; it is open to the public free
of charge . It is a worthy event and
should definitely not be missed.

6;

ith

with
special guest
Connie Kalder

& Bim

Thursday, October 30, Power Center- 7:30

Records
Beat Rodeo
HOME IN THE HEART OF THE
BEAT
I.R.S.
Home in the Heart of the
Beat, the Beat Rodeo's second
album, is a fine effort that could
only be categorized, if one were to

RENT A
REFRIGERATOR
Phone. 429 0121
or 815=895-2443 or
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qj

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10.7:30. Hill

be so daring as to try, as powerful
pop rock 'n' roll with good
measures of folk, country and
western, and soul thrown in.
Of the eleven tracks on the
album there is not a bad one in the
bunch, but there are a couple weak
ones, such as "Everything I'm Not"
and "In the Summertime."
However, they are only weak in

comparison to the rest of what is
presented here, most likely because
they are both slower songs and Beat
Rodeo's energetic style seems to
show through best on their more
upbeat numbers. Fortunately, the
remaining songs are just that:
upbeat, toe-tapping "Beat Rodeo"
music.
See RECORDS, Page 8

get acquainted with Tally Hall Month!

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC
PRESENTS
26th ANNUAL
CONFERENCE ON ORGAN MUSIC
MONDAY, OCTOBER 6 TODAY
Faculty Recital by Marilyn Mason,
Dupre's Le Chemin de la Croix
Hill Auditorium, 8:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7
Recital by French organist Dominique Serve
Blanche Anderson Moore Hall, 11:00 a.m.
Recital by Organ Majors - School of Music
Blanche Anderson Moore Hall, 2:30 p.m.
Recital by English organist David Sanger.
Works of Liszt and Dupre
Hill Auditorium, 8:30 p.m.-
WEDNFSDAV OCTORR R

c
3~
a
HO

T roughout October, Tally Hall
invites you to get acquainted with
our International Food Court and enjoy
20% off* the regular price of any food
item all month, after 6:00 p.m.

Come get to know us!
Liberty 0
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Cafes oShops
A N N A R B OR

URS-Food Court: Mon-Sat: II am-12 midnight, Sun: II am-9 pm.
Retail: Mon-Wed: 9:30am-s:30 pm, Thurs-Fri: 9:3 am-9 pm
Sat: 9:30 am-5:30 pm, Sun: 12 noon-S pm.

I ~ a ~a ~ I

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