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October 03, 1986 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-10-03

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 3, 1986 - Page 3

Reagan denies misleading press about Libya

WASHINGTON
(AP)-Administration officials
acknowledge the White House
;plotted to deceive Libyan leader
i oammar Gadhafi into thinking
Pe faced a new round of U.S.
bombing and a possible coup, but
President Reagan insisted
yesterday there was "not any plan
;of ours" to mislead the American
kpeople and press.
The aim of the secret plan was
,to convince Gadhafi that an
American raid - such as the
April 15 attack by U.S. bombers
against Tripoli and Benghazi -
' as being planned against him,
aid administration sources who
spoke on condition they not be
identified.
T H E Washington Post

reported in yesterday's editions
that an elaborate White House
campaign included "a
disinformation program with the
basic goal of making Gadhafi
think that there is a high degree of
internal opposition against him
within Libya, that his key trusted
aides are disloyal, that the U.S. is
about to move against him
militarily."
The plan was described in a
three-page memorandum sent to
Reagn by John Poindexter, the
president's national security
adviser, and was adopted at a
White House meeting Aug. 14, the
Post said.
The newspaper said the plan,
as described in the memo,
involved "a series of closely

coordinated events involving
covert, diplomatic, military and
public actions."
Meanwhile, the Senate
Intelligence Committee has
decided to look into the
administration's conduct in the
matter, according to Morton
Halperin, director of the
Washington office of the
American Civil Liberties Union.
HALPERIN said his group
asked both the House and Senate
intelligence committees to mount
such an investigation and to draft
legislation banning
disinformation campaigns in
this country and banning the use
of journalists by the CIA.
Reagan, in an interview with
columnists, said, "I challenge the

veracity of that entire story that I
read this morning with great,
shock." While acknowledging
the existence of some memos, he
said there was nothing about a
deliberate attempt to mislead the
U.S. press and people.
"Those (allegations) I
challenge," Reagan said in the
interview, a partial transcript of
which was released by the White
House. "They were not a part of
any meeting I've ever attended.
... This was not any plan of
ours."
THE president said the U.S.
intelligence community has been
tracking whether Gadhafi is
planning any terrorist acts.
"And so, yes, there are memos
back and forth about that, and
what the information is, and so
when I challenge the veracity of
Vert t tl
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave. - 663-5560
(Between Hill and South U.)
DR. PAUL FOELBER, Interim Pastor
Communion Service at 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
ESPISCOPAL CHURCH AT U-M
218 N. Division St.
Services daily, 5 p.m.; Midnight (exc.
Saturday).
All Are Welcome
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
(between Hill and S. University St.)
William Hillegonds, Senior Minister
Sunday Worship Services at 9:30 and
11:00a.m.
Church School, including nurseries at
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Sunday Bible Study 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Communion Service
7:00 p.m.
AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St. (between State & Division)
Sundays : 9:55 Worship, 11:25 Bible
Study groups for both Undergrads
and Graduate Students.
Wednesday: 5:30 Supper (free) and
Fellowship.
CENTER OPEN EACH DAY
for information call 663-9376
ROBERT B. WALLACE, PASTOR

that whole story, I can't deny that
here and there, they're going to
have something to hang it on," he
said.
Reagan said it was legitimate
to take steps to "have Mr. Gadhafi
go to bed every night wondering
what we might do. And I think
that's the best position for anyone
like that to be in."
A SENIOR administration

Viewing the
Eclipse Safely
HOW TO USE A
SUNSCOPE: Stand
with your back to the
sun, the box over your
head and look at the
image protected throuqth
the pinhole onto the
white paper
IMPORTANT:
Dnoat look directly at
the sun or directly
- Vih te pinhole.

- -
+ dTEwith a pihA
PAPER -- nhcne
Seal all inght
' leaks with black
tape or paper

official, who refused to be
identified, said, "The problem
with the story and the inaccuracy
of the story the president was
talking about is the allegation
and the implication that somehow
the U.S. government had
initiated or that the president had
authorized a program of
disinformation for the American
media.

Source: Sky & Telescope Magazine and the American Optometric Association AP Cylithl.
Associated Press
Astronomy experts advise today's eclipse watchers to view the sun through
a sunscope (above). The eclipse will begin in Ann Arbor at 1:45 p.m.and
will cover the greatest amount of sun at 3:05 p.m.
FLEA MARKET
Saturday, October 4, 9 am -1 pm
at Bishop on the Green
(Bishop St. - North Campus)
* Great Items
" Great Prices
* Great Buys
Sponsored by Family Housing
UNTIL JUSTICE AND PEACE
EMBRACE
author: Nicholas Walterstorff
OCTOBER 5, SUNDAY 7:30 P.M.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
TO BE BLACK IN SOUTH AFRICA
Walterstorff is a friend of Allan Boesak
and recently visited to support him in court.
OCTOBER 6, MONDAY MORNING 9-12 NOON
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
UNTIL JUSTICE AND PEACE EMBRACE
A discussion with the author of
this highly recommended book.
Office of Ethics and Religion, Campus Chapel, First Presbyterian Church,
First Baptist Church, Program on Studies on Religion r
..4 .;}..:^":::;:. .. . ;;"::: .:"".-}}SS}:rf""i"::};X}n::::;y:.t : .;:""

Associated Press

Truck rescue
A National Guard dump truck rescues a pregnant Viola Jean Kirk from her water-surrounded home in
Tahlequah, Illinois.
Airlines announce rate hikes
Stud ~ still flydspite increases

By LAURA STERN
Most major airlines are
raising their fares, but the
increases are not significantly
affecting students' holiday travel
lans.
United Airlines and
American Airlines announced
Wednesday that they had
increased their rates as much as
$30 per ticket. But Sheridan
O'Brien, manager of Boersma
I'ravel, has not noticed a decrease
on Thanksgiving ticket sales,
.and does not think the higher
prices will have any effect on
student travel plans. In fact, she
said, she has been having
difficulty finding enough space
on flights, especially to New
;York, which started selling out
'three weeks ago.
THE GREAT demand for

seats and the decrease in
competition among the airlines
has caused the rate increase.
Prices for round trip flights to
New York made 30 days in
advance will now average $138,
up from $98. Flights to Boston and
Miami have gone from an
average of $120 and $198,
respectively, to $158 and $287.
Reservations made less than 30
days in advance will cost even
more; a round-trip ticket to New
York made less than 30 days in
advance now costs about $420.
Travel agent Karen
McQueary attributes the high
demand for tickets to the need to
go home, especially during
Thanksgiving. According to
travel agent Paul Kowaplewski,
as long as parents continue to pay
for their children's tickets,

students will always fly home in
large numbers.
Many students say the pleasure
of visiting home far outweighs the
increased rates. "Because going
home relieves so much tension
that accumulates at school, the
price of the ticket is seemingly
unimportant," said art school
freshman Traci Seigel, who
planned to pay $420 for her round-
trip flight home for
Thanksgiving.
Some students who decided not
to fly home for the holidays did
not consider the high price as
much of a problem as the
difficulty in getting convenient
flights. Engineering sophomore
Joanna Tam decided not to go
home to New Jersey over Thanks-
pgiving because it's so close to
winter break.

KOREAN CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP

"THE WAY OF THE WICKED IS
LIKE DEEP DARKNESS;
THEY DO NOT KNOW WHAT MAKES
THEM STUMBLE" (Prov. 4:19)
GOP
COuN3EL
at CAMPUS CHAPEL
on FRIDAYS, 8:30 P.M.

T
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"I AM THE LIGHT OF THE WORLD
WHOEVER FOLLOWS ME WILL NEVER
WALK IN DARKNESS, BUT WILL
HAVE THE LIGHT OF LIFE." (John 8:12)
for more info call 994-0863

Contract proposal may avert strike

By BRIAN BONET
and MARTHA SEVETSON
Most teaching assistants at last
night's Graduate Employees Org-
anization meeting believe that a
strike will be unnecessary in
light of a settlement proposed dur-
ng mediation with the University
ast week.
About 100 members of the union
discussed the terms of the proposal
4and most of them think the terms
are "not worth striking over at
this point," said Belinda Davis, a
TA in the history department.
T H E proposal was re-
commended by mediator Edmund
Phillips of the Michigan Em-
ployment Relations Commission.
It included a 4.7 percent salary
ncrease, a 6 percent tuition
waiver increase, and no ex-
pansion of University-funded TA
training.
University TAs will vote in the
next 10 days on whether to accept
the settlement. The GEO's steer-
ing committee will authorize a
strike if the TAs reject it.
The GEO was asking for a 5.7
percent salary increase, a 10
percent tuition waiver increase,
and paid TA training in all

They (the University) saw us for the first
time in a different light. The union can do
something'
-Alice Haddy
GEO president

tH
get cquante wit Taly Hll Mnth

security, -according to Alice
Haddy, president of GEO and a
teaching assistant in the chem-
istry department. The proposal
offers TAs the right to a fair
hearing and due process in cases
of allegations of unsatisfactory
job performance. In addition, the
GEO would have 15, rather than
seven, days to appeal a
departmental decision to the
University.
The proposal also shifts the
responsibility of finding re-
placements for TAs during sick
leave or jury duty to University
departments. Currently TAs are
obligated to find their own
replacements.

counted Oct. 13. and results will
be released immediately. They
will be discussed at a GEO
meeting Oct. 15.
Haddy said that last week's
union activities showed the GEO's
strength.
"They (the University) saw us
for thesfirst time in a different
light," she said. "The union can
do something."
Mich. senators
override veto
WASHINGTON (AP)-Here
is how Michigan voted in the 78-21

4-c~chre vegetables
steaksandivic' e

Throughout October, Tally Hall
invites you to get acquainted with
our International Food Court and enjoy
20% off* the regular price of any food
item a/I month, after 6:00 p.m.

Come get to know us!
Liberty U

R
rlt, . ,a

a ,~ny , urt:
4'afgs

ct

% H/a
Cafes Shops
A N N A R B OR

HOURS-Food Court: Mon-Sat: Il am-12 midnight, Sun: It an-9 pm.
Retail:Mon-Wed: 9:30am-s:30pm, Thurs-Fri: 9:30am-9 pm,
Sat: 9:30 am-s:30pm, Sun: 12 noon-spm.

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