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September 12, 1986 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-12

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Page 2 -The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 12, 1986

Sorority rush takes off; emotions run high

By GINNY CARLSON
In a few hours, more than 1,000
women will be deciding what to
wear to the first night of what may
be the most exciting- or the most
frightening- experience in their
college careers: sorority rush.
The first stage of rush,
"mixers," starts today. Rushees
are required to visit each of the 19
houses on campus so that every
house has a chance to get new
members interested. Then the
two-way process of elimination
begins.
The women decide which
houses may be right for them, and
the sororities narrow down the
prospective pledges. This will
continue until the most formal
and suspenseful stage- "Final
Desserts, 'which takes place on
Sept. 24, when the rushees visit
only two houses and final
decisions are made.
Freshmen often hear horror
stories of being scrutinized by
sorority members during rush,
but rush parties are also a place

for rushees to decide where they
feel comfortable, members say.
LSA senior Amy Price,
president of Alpha Phi, said
sororities generally seek "people
that can be themselves and people
that have something to offer our
house."
Rush is not all fun and games,
members say. It is taken very
seriously by rushees and sorority
members alike. Panhellenic
Advisor Marybeth Seiler even
requested that names of
individual sororities not be used
in this story because it might give
some sororities an unfair
advantage.
Seiler said 1,145 women are
rushing, this year,'but only 600
will end up joining sororities.
Owing to the steadily
increasing popularity of Greek
life, three new sororities have
opened in the last two years.
Price speculated that this has
resulted from the campus
becoming more conservative.
Not all students, however, are

enthusiastic about the Greek
system. Ryan McCarthy, an LSA
freshman, said she considered
rushing, but decided against it
because "I don't want to limit
myself to one group of friends."
One LSA sophomore said she
went to the mass meeting for
sorority rush, but decided she
couldn't afford to join the Greek
system.
The fee for rushing is $15. The
cost of living in a sorority house is
comparable to living in the dorm,
but Gamma Phi Beta President
Ellen Murphy admitted that she
spent $400 on new clothes when

she rushed. Murphy also said the
social dues in her house are $110
per term.
Some students don't rush
because they are afraid it will
interfere with their study time.
Because of that, rush has been cut
down from three and a half weeks
to about two weeks this year. The
rushees give up at least 25 hours of
their time, and sorority members
spend much more time preparing.
Murphy said the long hours are
worthwhile because rush is "the
lifeblood of our sorority." If a
rushee misses one Mixer without
an excuse, she is dropped from
rush.

NOW

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Real estate pres. dies
By MARC CARREL Co., in a 1985 reorganization and
John Swisher Jr., chairman expansion plan of the company.
founder of one of the area's His son, John Swisher III, was
est and largest real estate named'. president and chief
ns, died Wednesday after a executive officer.
g illness. He was 67. The Swisher Realty Co. leases
n 1974 Swisher was elected and manages some of the most
sident of the American chapter prosperous properties in Ann
he International Real Estate Arbor, including the Michigan
leration, an organization Theater, the 611 Church St.
ich represents 6,000 Campus Arcade Building, the
fessional real estate dealers Georgetown Mall, and
n 29 countries. Williamsburg Square at
n the same year, he was Briarwood Mall.
ned Realtor of the Year by Ann Swisher is survived by his
>or's real estate board. He also wife, Harriet; sons John Swisher
i that award in 1961from the III of Dexter and Samuel Dean
al board and the Michigan Swisher of Illinois; a daughter,
)l Estate Association. Sallie Swisher Butts of Ann
Swisher was named.chairman Arbor; and a sister, Elizabeth
his firm, the Swisher Realty Swisher Childs, of Arizona.

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Residents flee Hart dam burst
The flood-swollen Pentwater river burst through a dam upriver
from Pentwater last night, forcing remaining residents to flee the
western Michigan village of 1,165, authorities said.
The Hart Dam, about five miles upriver from Pentwater, was
weakened by a deluge of water from a storm system that dumped
more than 13 inches of rain over Michigan's Lower Penninsula.
"It just gave way," Oceana county sheriffs Sgt. Mike Fox said at
7:20 p.m. yesterday. Fox said 250 remaining residents had been
warned to leave their homes, following the evacuation of about 750
people earlier in the day.
Flooded classrooms and offices forced officials to close Central
Michigan University yesterday and today, and the school was
considering cancelling its opening home football game tomorrow
with Idaho, university spokeswoman Jo Stephenson said.
Dow Jones takes record fall
NEW YORK- Waves of selling rocked the stock market
yesterday, sending prices into a record-breaking decline in the
busiest day ever at the New York Stock Exchange.
The slide was attributed largely to the recent sudden upsurge in
interest rates, and to computer-program selling by professional
investors that one analyst said reached "intimidating" proportions.
The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials plunged 86.61 points to
1,792.89, eclipsing the previous record point loss of 61.87 points on
July 7 of this year.
Overall stock-market losses for the day amounted to $110.82
billion, as measured by an index maintained by the investment
firm of Wilshire Associates.
Volume on the NYSE, at 237.57 million shares, surpassed the
previous high of 236.57million set on Aug. 3,1984.
Analysts said investors were selling stocks across the board as
the rise of interest rates that began more that a week ago continued.
In the. credit markets, prices of long-term government bonds,
which move in the opposite direction from interest rates, dropped
more than $20 for every $1,00 in face value.
Police arrest hijack suspect
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan- Authorities arrested an Arab on
suspicion of helping four terrorists hijack a Pan Am jumbo jet, a
police inspector said today.
The inspector, Javed Mirza, told The Associated Press that
Sulman Taraki was arrested Wednesday as he stepped off aplane
at Islamabad airport.
Mirza said authorities had been alerted that Taraki may have
been involved in the hijacking, but he did not elaborate on whatrole
Taraki was suspected of playing.
Earlier yesterday, the government issued a statement through the
national news agency denying local newspaper reports that Taraki
was believed to have been the mastermind behind the hijacking. At
least 20 people were killed and scores wounded Friday when four
gunmen seized a Pan Am Boeing 747 and held it for 17 hours at
Karachi airport. The hijacking ended abruptly when the gunmen
apparently panicked and began firing on their approximately 400
hostages.
The government has identified the four gunmen .as
Palestinians. They are being held at a Karachi army base.
Senators appeal to Gorbachev
for release of cancer victims
WASHINGTON- Senators and cancer specialists pleaded
yesterday for the lives of six cancer-stricken "refuseniks,"
pressing Soviet officials to let the victims rejoin their families and
'seek medical treatment in the West.
"The request is very simple: Give them a chance to live," said
Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) who has written two letters asking
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to let the patients leave.
The six patients, including a 7-year-old with leukemhe
relatives inCalifornia, Massachusetts, Co hra Ieuk
Canada, and Israel. All have been' denied visas to leave the Soviet
Union, some of them repeatedly, with authorities.citing security
reasons.
The victims' plights were described at a crowded press
conference attended by some family members and interrupted by an
emotional telephone call from several of those trying to leave.
"We're very happy and very grateful...that you have found the
time to be with us and that you are trying to do something for our
rescue," Tatyana Kheifets Bogomolny, a translator who has breast
cancer, said over the phone from Moscow. "The best cure for us will.
be to be reunited with our families."
Judge frees jailed producer.
DETROIT- A federal judge ordered a television producer
released from jail yesterday, one day after he was taken into
custody for withholding videotapes from a grand jury investigating
the slaying of a state trooper.
Sixth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Damon Keith stayed a
contempt-of-court citation issued against Bradley Stone of WJBK-
TV in Southfield until a hearing on his appeal. No date was set for

the hearing.
The producer said he was glad to be freed, but added, "It's a short
victory unless the state Senate passes a shield law" for broadcast
journalists.
Stone had done a series of stories on gangs in Detroit and offered
to turn over the broadcast segments but not parts that never were
broadcast, citing anonymity he had promised his sources.
Grand' jury subpeonas served on WJBK demanded the station's
written, filmed, or recorded material gathered for the series.
Vol. XCVII- No.7
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday
through Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription
rates: September through April-$18 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the
city. One term-$10 in town; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and
subscribes to Pacific News Service and the Los Angeles Times
Syndicate.

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CALL 764-9466.

\

Editor in Chie ........ERIC MATTSON
ManagingEditor.....RACHEL GOTTLIEB
News Editor......................JERRY MARKON
City Editor........................CHRISTY RIEDEL
Features Editor....................AMY MINDELL
NEWS STAFF: Eve Becker, Melissa Birks,
Rebecca Blumenstein, Nancy Braiman,
Harish Chand, Dov Cohen, Tim Daly, Rob
Earle, Ellen Fiedelholtz, Martin Frank, Lisa
Green, Stephen Gregory, Steve Herz, Mary
Chris Jaklevic, Philip Levy, Michael Lustig,
Kery Murakami, Peter Orner, Eugene Pak,
Martha Sevetson, Wendy Sharp, Susanne
Skubik, Naomi Wax.
Opinion Page Editor............KAREN KLEIN
Associate Opinion Page
Editor..............................HENRY PARK
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Rosemary
Chinnock, Gayle Kirshenbaum, Peter
Mooney, Caleb Southworth.
Arts Editor.......................NOELLE BROWER
Associate Arts Editor........REBECCA CHUNG
Music ...............BETH FERTIG

Sports Editor..................BARB McQUADE
Associate Sports
Editors........................DAVE ARETHA
MARK BOROWSKY,
RICK KAPLAN
ADAM MARTIN
PHIL NUSSEL
SPORTS STAFF: Paul Dodd, Liam Flaherty,
Jon Hartmann, Darren Jasey, Julie Langer,
Christian- Martin, Eric Maxson, Greg
McDonald, Scott Miller, Greg Molzon, Jerry
Muth, Adam Ochlis, Lisa Poutans, Jeff Rush,
Adam Schefter, Scott Shaffer, Pete Steinert,
Douglas Volan.
Business Manager.......MASON FRANKLIN
Sales Manager....................DIANE BLOOM
Finance Manager.....REBECCA LAWRENCE
Classified Manager......GAYLA BROCKMAN
Ass't Sales Manag'er.........DEBRA LEDERER
Ass't Classified Manager...GAYLE SHAPIRO
DISPLAY SALES: Barb Calderoni, Irit
Elrand, Lisa Gnas, Melissa Harnbrick, Alan
Heyman, Julie Kromholz, Anne Kubek,
Wendy Lewis, Jason Liss, Laura Martin, Scott

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8 a.m. to 5 p.m'
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