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September 12, 1986 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-12

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C I
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Sir t9auan
Ninety-seven years of editorial freedom

EaIIQ

Vol. XCVII - No. 7

Copyright 1986, The Michigan Daily

Ann Arbor, Michigan - Friday, September 12, 1986

Ten Pages

'U'

Coun

By REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN
The University Council yesterday decided to
shift its discussion to political dissent, the most
controversial area of the proposed code of non-
academic conduct. Faculty members agreed with
students on the council that the subject could be
eliminated from a final draft of the code.
"It might be that distinguishing the category of
civil dissent will have us do nothing about it at all,"
said councilmember Shaw Livermore, a professor of
history.
Stuent councilmembers have argued that any
code governing student behavior outside the
classroom should not allow the University to crack
down on political dissent. The issue helped raise
student opposition to previous drafts of the code.

cil tackle
The council-composed of students, faculty, and
administrators-has been working on writing a
code since October of 1984. The University
administration insists a code is needed to
supplement the civil court system.
By starting last spring with a discussion draft of
"emergency procedures" covering violent crimes
like murder and assault, the council had hoped to
avoid controversy, gather input, and gain
momentum to tackle more controversial issues.
The council yesterday decided to discuss the
controversial issue of political dissent, but student
members of the council still question the.need for
any code.
"Our mistake has been assuming that there are
problems that can't be adequately dealt with using

political
mediation or other alternatives," said student
member Ken Weine.
"No one has ever proven that this University
needs a code," added student member Jennifer
Faigel.
Such ambivalance has contributed to the
council's slow progress since it began working. The
panel has been plagued by rotating members and
frequent absences.
"The reason we're not focused is that we don't all
agree upon where we want to go," said Internal
Medicine Prof. Donald Rucknagel, co-chair of the
council. "We should proceed to wherever we want to
do by starting from scratch," he added.
The council has still received no reaction from
the University community to its emergency

dissent
procedures and Rucknagel feels," there's no
urgency to deal with it."
But the administration appears to be growing
more impatient. University President Harold
Shapiro last fall threatened to bypass the council and
propose the administration's code proposal- which
has been rejected by the Michigan Student
Assembly- to the Board of Regents because he was
dissatisfied with the council's progress. MSA has
the right to approve any code draft.
Although Virginia Nordby, executive assistant to
the president and author of a 1984 draft of the the
code, declined to comment on the University
Council's progress last night, she said that the
administration's attitude has not changed.

Michigan
set to
tackle
Irish

By PHIL NUSSEL
The show is about to begin.
The epic' saga production,
Michigan vs. Notre Dame, will
take place tomorrow afternoon
before more than 60,000 standing
room only fans in Notre Dame
Stadium.
FOR THE Wolverines, the
South Bend saga marks the
beginning of what they hope will
be a Big Ten championship
season. A national title is in the
picture.
For the Fighting Irish, the show
ushers in another post-Ara era,
the Lou Holtz era.
The winner will get raving
reviews and go into the '86 season
thinking it can beat anybody.
THE LOSER will be the Sneak
Previews ' "Dog of the Week"
and continue its season in
mediocrity.
All Hollywood hype aside, the
game promises to be a classic
tradition vs. tradition showdown
in front of Touchdown Jesus. The
third-ranked Wolverines are 6-
point favorites, but the coaching
debut of Holtz on the fabled Irish
turf makes the game look like it
has - pardon the cliche' -
"upset" written all over it.
"Any time you play Notre
to y N Dame in South Bend the first
game of the year, it probably
See WOLVERINES, Page 10

Alpha Delta Phi fraternity, 556 South State street, holds annual "Run for the Roses pep rally." After the pep rally, a fund-raising party for
the Ronald Macdonald foundation was held.

Egypt Israel hold
peace conferences

ALEXANDRIA, Egypt
(AP)-Prime Minister Shimon
Peres and President Hosni
Mubarak held the first Israeli-
Egyptian summit meeting in five
years yesterday in an effort to
revive the quest for Middle East
peace.
The two leaders, dispensing
with aides and interpreters,
talked privately in English for
several hours in this
Mediterranean port.
The two shook hands cordially
as they met at the Ras el-Tin
presidential palace beside the
Mediterranean Sea shortly after
Peres arrived from Tel Aviv.
Alexandria was the site of the last
Israeli-Egyptian summit
meeting, in August 1981 between
Egypt's Anwar Sadat and Israel's
Menachem Begin.
Moslem extremists
assassinated Sadat two months
later..
Egypt is the only Arab nation
with diplomatic relations with
Israel, and any overture to the
Jewish state is considered a
political gamble by Mubarak.

Mubarak has said he
envisioned the summit as
primarily a forum for discussion
of the Palestinian question.
Peres said before leaving
Israel, "We shall not permit the
peace process to die away or fade
away, and we shall do whatever
we can to bring life and spirit to
the momentum for peace."
Relations between the two
countries hit bottom in 1982 with
Israel's invasion of Lebanon.
This summit, hailed as the
beginning of warmer relations,
was 'made possible by an
agreement, signed Wednesday,
to submit a nagging dispute over
the 250-acre border enclave of
Taba to international arbitration.
Speaking at the working
lunch, Peres said the Palestinian
issue would be discussed during
the summit.
Peres said at the lunch that U.
N. Security Council resolutions
242 and 338 should serve as a
basis for peace talks. But neither
is acceptable to Palestinian
leaders because both refer to
Palestinians as refugees and not

Overcrowdin
Comimuter uses pose prob lens
BylHampton Dellinger. its never been this bad." said 14 minutes. We're having to cut
Victor Impink, a senior in the time off our lunch and coffee
Many students traveling to College of Engineering breaks,"' said driver Clyde
North Campus on University "You can't even move," added Buckley.
buses this fall are finding long engineering sophomore Mike "The schedule needs to be
waits followed by cramped body- Hoekstra. changed. Right now, they're
to-body rides in overcrowded To accommadate the increase sacrificing safety," said Buckley,
buses. in students, ,officials in the who added that the delays have
The buses, traditionally University's Department of increased overcrowding.
plagued by delays, have been Transportation are trying to run Another driver, who would
slowed by an influx of 1200 buses from the C.C. Little stop to only- be identified as
students who have classes in the North Campus every 7 minutes "Kevin,"said "the schedule's all
new Electrical Engineering and instead of every 12. But bus screwed up. They've got to do
Computer Science building on drivers say the new schedule is something totally different." He
North Campus. unrealistic. pointed to delays in loading the
"I've been riding the buses to "There's no way we can make
North Campus for four years and it up and back to North Campus in See NORTH CAMPUS, Page 5

Pe res
... discusses peace with Mubarak
a people with a right to self-
determination.
Peres said Israel is willing to
discuss the idea of an
international peace conference,
an Arab proposal strongly
supported by Egypt and Jordan but
unattractive to the United States
and Israel because it would
involve the Soviet Union.
"The Palestinians have a right
to participate in the determination
of their own future," Peres said,

Winston show to fight
By ELIZABETH ATKINS Auditorium for donatio
Solo pianist GeorgeWinston's concert tonight Education-Action Co
will have more than music-it also offers audience EoduitoAc tioC
members a chance to contribute to the fight drive.
hunger. The committee will r
Since February, the native Michigan artist has and collection box for
sponsored food drives at all of his concerts through FestiFalltin the Diag.
local organizations. Fe oitteDisg.
When Winston booked tonight's concert, he The committee is cur
requested that a booth be set up in the lobby of Hill See WINST

hunger
ns. The World Hunger
rmmittee, a campus-
on, is coordinating the
un an information table
canned food today at
rently organizing a "fast"
ON, Page 8

-

TODAYI-
Find The Phones
The 54 new emergency phones on campus
could be your ticket to enlarging your record
collection. The Sexual Assault Prevention
mnrl -.r.'*. - vvi ---- ,, n' a "Find The

emergency phones are there, and are aware of
them, and know how to use them." Contest sheets
can be picked up at the program's Festifall table
tomorrow, or at the office on the third floor of the
Union. Sheets can be turned in at the office or the
Campus information center desk on the first floor
of the Union until 5 p.m. Friday, September 26.
Hisoanics celebrate

present "Contributions to the Development of a
Multicultural University Environment.
Associate Vice President forAcademic Affairs
Niara Sudarkasa will also speak about University
minority recruitment and retention efforts and
emphasis Hispanic enrollment. Rosa Lopez,
Hispanic Associate of the Office of Minority
Student Services, said that next week's activities
will heln foster an ethnic cultural awareness

- INSIDE
VOTING: Opinion urges-on voter registration
drive. See Page 4.
HELL: Arts reviews Matt Groening's expose
on the workina world. See Paae 7.

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