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January 17, 1986 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-01-17

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King's B-day observances vary

The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 17, 1986 - Page 3
Reagan hails Soviet
disarmament plan

from The Associated Press
Martin Luther King's birthday,
:celebrated as a federal holiday for the
'first time on Monday, will be a patch-
work memorial: honored in his home
estate and cities where he led protests,
but ignored in the town where he was
slain.
By federal law, the third Monday of
January is a holiday for reflection "on
the principles of racial equality and
non-violent social change" that
guided king, who was born Jan. 15,
1929, and murdered on April 4, 1968.
THAT LAW has deflated the
lingering controversy over a holiday
which employers - righy up to
President reagan - had long opposed
as too expensive. A survey by
Associated Press bureaus in 50 states
found only scattered and local con-
troversies, including one in Memphis,
Tenn.
In Memphis, where King was gun-
ned down by James Earl Ray 18 years
ago, the date of the death is a holiday
but the City Council has refused to add
a birthday holiday in January.

v

"The City Council has missed its
opportunity to do what's right and
proper and get in line with the rest of
the nation," James Smith, executive
director of Local 1733 of the American
Federation of State, County and
Municipal Employees, said Wed-
nesday.
LATER IN the day, Memphis
Mayor Dick Hackett said city em-
ployees can take off Monday, without
pay, to celebrate King's birthday.
In Milford, Conn., Mayor Alberta
Jagoe ordered city offices closed an
hour early on Monday, following a
protest by the local Association of
colored People over her decision
against granting a holiday for 500 city
workers. It has been a state holiday
for a decade.
"I think his memory should be
honored," she said. "But as for the
holiday, it's strictly a negotiated mat-
ter asnd a contract matter with our
labor unions."
A SURVEY of four dozen nearby
Connecticut towns found that 17 are
observing the holiday this year, 12 are

HAPPENINGS
~ x
Highlight
Performance Network presents tonight Children of Sandino, written
and directed by local playwright Tami Spry. The play is based on oral
, histories of women who fought in the Nicaraguan revolution during the
Samoza regime. The show begins at 8 p.m. at 408 W. Washington.
Speakers
School of Public Health - Vernice Davis-Anthony, 3 p.m., SPH I
e Auditorium.
South and Southeast Asian Studies - Brown bag lecture, Joy Shepard,
"The Meaning of Form in a Newar House," noon, Commons room, Lane
x Hall.
Guild House - Bunyan Bryant, ''Economic Democracy for Ann Ar-
;bor," noon, 802 Monroe.
Affirmative Action - Brown bag, Virginia B. Nordby, "Current Issues
in Affirmative Action," noon, conf. rm., 350 S. Thayer.
Meetings
University Aikido Club - 5 p.m., Wrestling room, IMSB.
y Regents - 9 a.m., Fleming Bldg.
Juggling Club -3p.m., Union.
Tae Kwon Do Club - Practice, 6 p.m., room 1200, CCRB.
Korean Christian Fellowship - Bible study, 9 p.m., Campus Chapel.
International Students Fellowship - 7 p.m.
s
Miscellaneous
International Folk Dancing - 8:30 p.m., Angell Elementary School.
c Black Student Union - Movie on the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.,
6 p.m., Law Quad.
Hockey - RPI, 7:30 p.m., Yost Ice Arena.
Women's Indoor Track - Michigan relays, Track and Tennis Bldg.
Women's Basketball - Minnesota, 7:30 p.m., Crisler Arena.
Gay Liberation Front - Coffee House, 8 p.m.
University Club - Buffet, 11:30 a.m.
Michigan in Motion Video Yearbook - Free showing, 1985 Video Year-
book, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Fishbowl.
t~.
Saturday
Highlight
D.J. Jacqui 0. plays the current British and European dance music
tonight at the University Club's New Music-Euro-Dance party.
Meetings
Women's Aglow Fellowship - 9:30 a.m., Cornerstone Church.
MacTechnics - Mactechnics-Macintosh Users Group, 9 a.m.,
Schorling Auditorium.
Ann Arbor Go Club - 2 p.m., room 1433, Mason Hall.
Miscellaneous
Men's Gymnastics - Minnesota, Illinois, 1 p.m., Crisler Arena.
Men's Wrestling - Illinois, 7:30 p.m., Crisler Arena.
Hockey - RPI, 7:30 p.m., Yost Ice Arena.
Men's Indoor Track - Michigan relays, Track and Tennis Bldg.
Women's Swimming - Ohio State, 2 p.m., Matt Mann Pool.
Women's Gymnastics - Illinois, noon, Crisler Arena.
Sunday
Highlight
The Bullard Film Series presents The Business of America and The
Wall Street Connection at 7 p.m. in Auditorium A of Angell Hall.
Meetings

Video Yearbook - 5 p.m., 1412 Mason Hall.
Alpha Phi Omega - 7 p.m., Union.
Miscellaneous
Canterbury House - Episcopal Worship Service, 5 p.m., 218 N.
Division.

not and five, like Milford, are gran-
ting leave only if the contract calls for
it.
The Central Illinois Employers'
Association surveyed 84 businesses in
its area and found that no factories
would be closed. Only 11 percent of
banks, insurance agencies and
similar businesses plan to close, ac-
cording to Sandy Lang, a secretary.
James Fahey, manager of com-
munications for IBM in Poughkeep-
sie, N.Y., saud employees would be
given time off to appear in or attend
programs or services honoring King.
STATE WORKERS in Tennessee
have Monday off, but the Chattanooga
Board of Education a request by
teachers for a paid holiday. School of-
ficials offered to dismiss classes Jan.
20 and make the day up in June like a
snow day, but Superintendent James
McCullough said closing schools and
paying teachers would cost more
than $150,000,
In Alabama and Arkansas, King
shares the holiday with Gen. Robert
E. Lee; Virginia salutes King, Lee
and another Confederate general,
Stonewall Jackson, at one time.
King's birthday is a holiday in South
Carolina, North Dakota and Iowa, but
state employees 'don't automatically
get the day off, while Oregon's state
workers learned just this week that
they would not be working Monday.
IN CALIFORNIA, Colorado,
Delaware, Kansas, Minnesota,
Nebraska, Nevada, Oklahoma,
Oregon, Washingtondand Wisconsin,
King's birthday is a holiday for the
first time this year. On Friday,
Utah's Senate passed a bill
authorizing a King holiday.
Private businesses generally are
ignoring the holiday, but many em-
ployers offered workers the oppor-
tunity to attend King celebrations,
with pay.
Some states continued with
celebrations on Jan. 15, the birth date
while Indiana celebrated on Dec. 31.
MONDAY WILL be a holiday in
Montgomery, Ala., where a young
Martin Luther King led a 382-day bus
boycott beginning in 1955, and in
Selma, Ala., where he led voting
rights protesters to confrontations
with law enforcement officers at a
bridge in 1965.
"Dr. King was to America what
Jesus was to a sinner and that was a
savior," said Selma Councilman
Lorenzo Harrison, who sponsored the
holiday resolution.
Among the oddities of the day:
*Monday is Maritn Luther King Jr.
Day in Kentucky, but only the
Legislature and employees of the
state's judiciary system will be off.
*State workers in south Carolina,
for the third year, have the choice of a
day off on King's birthday, Robert E.
Lee's birthday Jan. 19, Confederate
Memorial Day May 10, or Jefferson
Davis' birthday June 3.
*State workers in Oregon didn't
know they would have Monday off un-
til this week, when an arbitrator ruled
that a 1985 law creating a state
holiday in King's honor automatically
made all workers eligible for a paid
day off:

WASHINGTON (UPI) - President
Reagan yesterday welcomed a new
arms proposal from Mos cow as the
first Soviet support for "actually
eliminating nuclear weapons" and
urged the Kremlin to back it up at the
bargaining table.
The plan calls for 50 percent reduc-
tions in nuclear arsenals capable of
reaching the other side's territory,
and elimination within eight years of
U.S. and Soviet medium-range
missiles based in Europe.
THIS WOULD be followed by a
worldwide nuclear weapons freeze
and, finally, complete nuclear disar-
mament by the year 2000.
Gorbachev made his proposal Wed-
nesday night and followed it up
yesterday with another statement hit-
ching any cuts in nuclear arsenals to
the scrapping of Reagan's Strategic
Defense Initiative, popularly known
as "Star Wars."
The White House described the

Reagan
... offers cautious praise

Soviet disarmament pllan as "a
serious proposal that's worthy of
study" - but also flawed.
SPECIFICALLY U.S. officials said
some elements of the three-point plan
were imbalanced and no different
from previous positons rejected by
Washington.
Singled out as the most
troublesome was the continued in-
sistence that Reagan abandon his
"Star Wars" missile-defense
program, a renewed proposal to end
nuclear testing and a U.S. "disadvan-
tage" in medium-range nuclear
missiles.
There was a more positive U.S.
response to a possible shift in the
Sovietsposition on medium-range
missiles in Europe and apparent
willingness to address the issue of on-
site verification.
"We're very grateful for the offer,"
Reagan said.

COME JOIN OUR STAFF
The University of Michigan Housing Division
RESIDENCE HALL POSITIONS 1986-87
The Housing Division is looking for well-qualified candidates to serve as resident staff
members in Residence Halls. We specifically are looking for students interested in:
-Serving as positive academic and group living role models
-Fostering a spirit of community
-Developing and strengthening leadership, communication and group skills and
-Developing programs for a diverse student population.
THERE WILL BE TWO INFORMATION MEETINGS:
Sunday, January 26, 1986 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.
Tuesday, January 28, 1986 7:00 - 9:00 P.m.
IN AUDITORIUM 3 - MODERN LANGUAGE BUILDING
Representatives from the Housing Division will be there to provide information and
answer questions regarding candidate qualifications, selection processes and job
expectations. Applications are available only at these meetings.
ALL NEW APPLICANTS ARE REQUIRED TO ATTEND
ONE OF THESE MEETINGS
An Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer
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