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January 17, 1986 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-01-17

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Page 2- The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 17, 1986
Tutu draws thousands to Cobo arena raily

(Continued from Page 1)

A small man with a slight accent,
Tutu admitted he is not a powerful
orator, just a man who knows he must
"speak on behalf of millions."
As the crowd broke out into ap-
plause and shouted "good evening" to1
him, Tutu responded, "One of the ad-
vantages of having a skin color such
as mine is that when you are blushing,
people don't notice."I
TUTU GAVE the people of Detroit a;
compliment, thanking them for len-;
ding their support to the battle against
apartheid. "You have forced the

president of this country, 'who said he,
would not apply sanctions to South
Africa, to do so," he said.
But Tutu noted there is still much to
fight, urging the audience not to be
fooled by the argument that American
businesses in South Africa benefit that
country's oppressed black majority.
"They are saying that we are aliens
in our own land. In the land of my bir-
th I cannot move freely. I must
always carry with me a pass," Tutu
said.
"THEY OUGHT not kid themselves
by saying they are in South Africa for

our benefit. At least they ought to say
they are in South Afirca because it
pays to be in South Africa. They are in
South Africa because of cheap labor."
He added, "And those who invest in
South Africa benefit in that kind of
system. They benefit in a system that
not accidentally, but by deliberate
government policy, seeks to destroy
black family life."
The arena, nearly filled to capacity,
reverberated with applause and
shouts when he announced: "I have
come here to say to you, we are going
to be free. yY
Detroit Mayor Coleman Young ad-

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ded his voice to Tutu's. "His fight is
our fight," he proclaimed, en-
couraging people to contribute to
South Africa's freedom by making
contributions to Tutu's scholarship
and refugee aid funds.
Local business, labor, and religous
gropus hoped to raise $225,000 for
Tutu's programs before the bishop left
Detroit, Young announced.
Sheila Vann, leader of the Second
Ebeneezer Baptist Church Choir
which performed at the ceremony,
said, "I believe it will help the people
of South Africa. It will bond us
together, to help each other."
"I'm just glad to be here, and to
know if something is done (about
apartheid to know I'm a part of it,"
Vann said.
'Accuracy'
debated
(Continued from Page 1)
threat poisons free classroom
discussion."
A NON-TENURED professor faces
acceptance on how and what he
teaches, said Waters. If he fears an
AIA report, "things said in class can
be restricted," he added.
However, Csorba said that
professors should come under public
scrutiny. "Professors do not have the
right to claim immunity from public
criticism," he said. "AIA feels that
professors for so long got away with
everything they wanted to say without
criticism."
"There was no accountability to the
taxpayer. Professors should be ac-
countable so people who support
universities know what is going on,"
Csorba added.
THIS DOES not mean that AIA goes
after every professor who students
have complained about, said Csorba.
Before an investigation can begin,
students must send in a course
syllabus, reading list, and classroom
notes to AIA, he said. Then AIA con-
tacts both professors and students to
verify the charges.
Only when the charges are verified
is anything published in AIA's
newsletter, said Csorba.
WATERS charged AIA with having
a bias agaisnt professors espousing
liberal ideas. For instance, AA began
investigating an Oakland University
Latin studies professor, Mary
Karasch, after reports that she holds
the United States responsible for
some of the troubles in Nicaragua,
Waters noted. '
Csorba admitted most of the com-
plaints he receives areagainst liberal
or left-wing professors, but he said
they do investigate professors with a
conservative bias. Csorba cited a
complaint he received against a Nor-
thwestern University profesor who
said the Holocaust never occurred.
But Waters said the students who
are supposed to benefit from AA's
newsletter hate the organization.
"Oakland University Congress
denounced AIA. The Michigan
Collegiate Coalition, a conglomerate
of 15 Michigan state-owned colleges,
condemned the organization," said
Waters. "If there is such opposition
from the students, something is
wrong."
~'e+u+ r

IN BRIEF
COMPILED FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS AND
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS
Armed S. African police stop
.p
Indian-student school boycott
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Witnesses said armed police
patrolled an affluent Indian school yesterday, forcing students to attend
class and perhaps signaling a tougher attitude toward boycotts that white
authorities see as a catalyst of anti-apartheid protest and violence.
The action at Rylands High School near Cape Town was the first time in
16 months of unrest that police and soldiers acted to make sure classes
were held. Students, teachers and other witnesses said the officers stood
in the classroom doorways and patrolled the halls.
Boycotts have been most common in black schools since the protest of
white-minority rule, in which about 1,000 people have been killed, began
in September 1984.
Students at Rylands, who have supported the boycott movement,
gathered on the grounds before classes yesterday. Witnesses said some
hesitated at entering the building, then police appeared and drove them
inside.
Ypsilanti prison siege ends
YPSILANTI - Two convicts late yesterday freed the remaining two
hostages that they had held at knifepoint since mid-morning Wednesday,
officials said.
Marvin May, administrative assistant for the Michigan Parole Board,,
said the two inmates were released unharmed. May said the convicts
freed the hostages on the condition that they would be transferred to a
federal corrections institution and that they will have a meeting with
state Corrections Director Dan Bolden.
"They will be transferred to a federal corrections institution after
processing," May said.
"Until they are ready to be transferred, they will be held at various
county jails around the state for safety reasons," he added.
Six new Uranus moons found
PASADENA, Calif. - The Voyager 2 spacecraft has discovered six more
small moons around the planet Uranus, doubling the number of moons
now known to orbit the seventh planet from the sun,-NASA said yester-
day.
Five of Uranus' moons had been discovered by telescopes on Earth,
while the sixth - designated 1985U1 - was discovered by.Voyager 2 in late
December. Its discovery was announced last Wednesday.
Scientists believe Voyager may find as many as 18 additional moons,
which would raise the total to 30 and "mean that Uranus has more moons
than any of the other planets," said Ellis Miner, deputy Voyager project
scientist at Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
The six newly discovered moons are clustered at roughly the same
distance from the planet, which ."possibly implies they are a result of a
larger satellite that broke up," Miner said.
That theory will be bolstered if Voyager 2's television cameras find that
the moons have irregular shapes when it makes its closest approach to
Uranus and its moons and rings on Jan. 24, he added.
Judge drops murder, assault
charges against Goetz
NEW YORK - Attempted murder and assault charges were dropped
yesterday against Bernhard Goetz, who shot four youths on a subway
train more than a year ago, but he still faces three counts of possessing a
weapon.
Four counts of attempted murder and four counts of assault against
Goetz were dropped by Judge Stephen Crane, according to court papers
released by Manhattan District Attorney Robert Morgenthau.
Crane severed the original weapons charges brought in a Jan. 25, 1985,
grand jury indictment from the more serious charges contained in a
second indictment returned March 27.
The shootings occurred Dec. 22, 1984, when Goetz stepped on a subway
train. He sat down and was approached by a black man who either asked
for or demanded $5.
Goetz pulled a revolver, said, "I have $5 for each of you"' and began
shooting. He fled before police arrived and surrendered nine days later in
Concord, N.H.
Goetz was the subject of a question at a presidential news conference
and the topic of a congressional hearing. He twice appeared on the cover
of Time magazine, and polls showed he enjoyed overwhelming popular
support.
Fog postpones shuttle landing
SPACE CENTER, Houston - Rain and fog in Florida kept luckless
Columbia from landing yesterday, and NASA said failure to bring the
shuttle back to its home port today would force cancellation of a March
flight devoted to Halley's comet.
The astronauts, who endured a record seven delays before finally laun-
ching their mission Sunday, were instructed to aim toward a 7:12 a.m.
landing today at the Kennedy Space Center.
But National Aeronautics and Space Administration officials said the
Florida weather forecast was uncertain and it was expected to be even

worse tomorrow.
Columbia's planned landing yesterday was canceled just 19 minutes
before mission commander Robert Gibson was to trigger rocket engine
firings that would drop the winged craft out of orbit.
Yesterday's delay was the eighth for Columbia's flight. Launch of the
mission was postponed seven times over 25 days before it lifted off last
Sunday. The delays put NASA into a tight schedule bind to meet the agen-
cy's goal this year of launching 15 shuttle flights, including the comet
study mission.

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01he Athtgan Batnfi
Vol XCVI- No. 76
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the Fall and Winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April - $18.00 in Ann Arbor; $35.00 outside the city. One term -
$10.00 in town; $20.00 out of town.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and Sub-
scribes to United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles
Times Syndicate, and College Press Service.

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Editor in Chief..................NEIL CHASE
Opinion Page Editors .......... JODY BECKER
JOSEPH KRAUS
Managing Editors ....... GEORGEA KOVANIS
JACKIE YOUNG
News Editor..............THOMAS MILLER
Features Editor...........LAURIE DELATER
City Editor .............. ANDREW ERIKSEN
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Cheryl Wistrom.
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