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April 17, 1986 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-04-17

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TN
aro
U Campus Cinema

- U MM

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, April 17, 1986- Page 3

11

hat's happening
und Ann Arbor

Bills may make it harder to
declare financial independence

The Vixen (Russ Meyer, 1968)
AAFC, 7 & 10 p.m., Aud. A, Angell
Hall.
A story of an insatiable wife who
conducts affairs with everyone she
meets. This is one of the first X-rates
films to appeal to couples.
Mud Honey (Russ Meyer, 1965)
AAFC, 8:20 p.m., Aud. A, Angell
Hall.
The tale of a brutal husband, his
beseiged wife, and their rotten
marriage is at first glance a brutal
sexploitation flick. It is, however, a
chilling portrait of male repression
by the man some call the "Southern
Fellini." Rated X.
The Three Penny Opera (G. W. Pab-
st, 1931) CZ,7p.m.,MLB 4.
This is the story of the real, low
down, conniving Macheath. The
great G. W. Pabst directed this
original version of Bertoit Brect's
masterpiece based on John Gay's
The Beggar's opera.
An American In Paris (V. Minnelli,
1951) CZ, 9 p.m., MLB 4.
Gene Kelly plays an American ar-
tist trying to make a living in Paris.
Co-stars Nina Foch and Leslie
Caron. Gershwin score.
Faust (F. W. Murnau, 1929) CG, 7
p.m., Nat Sci.
A beautiful silent film using a cast
fresco of light and shadow. The
classic tale of a man who sells his
soul to the devil.
Sunrise (F. W. Murnau, 1927) CG, 9
p.m., Nat Sci.
One of the silent screen's best
remembered triumphs, it deals with
a man who is persuaded by the other
woman in his life to murder his wife.
Shoah (Claude Lanzmann, 1985) Hill
St., 6p.m., (pt. 2). Mich.
Critically acclaimed, this is Lan-
zmann's 91/: hour Holocaust
documentary which was ten years in
the making. Beautiful.
Performances
A Wonderful Life - University
Musical Theater Program, 8 p.m.,
Power Center (764-0450).
Director Brent Wagner and
choreographer Tim Millet present
the world premier of Sheldon Har-
nick and Joe Raposo's musical
adaptation of Frank Capra's film
It's a Wonderful Life.
The Priates of Penzance - Gilbert
and Sullivan Society, 8:15 p.m.,
Mendelssohn Theater (761-7855).
Steven Krahnke directs this
rollicking musical farce of mistaken
identity with happily-ever-after en-
ding. ,
University Band/Campus Band -
University School of Music, 8 p.m.,
Hill Auditorium (763-4726).
Eric Becher and Steve Roberts
direct these two student ensembles.
What the Butler Saw - Suspension
Theater, 8 p.m., Performance Net-
work (665-1400).
Andy Mennick directs controver-
sial English Playwright Joe Orton's
last play, which irreverently lam-
poons the traditional bedroom farce.
Bars & Clubs
THE ARK (761-1451) - Jean Rit-
chie,folk.
BIRD OF PARADISE (662-8310)
- Ron Brooks Trio, jazz.
THE BLIND PIG (996-8555) -
John Scofield, jazz guitarist.
THE EARLE (994-0211) - Larry
Manderville, jazz.
MR. FLOOD'S PARTY (995-2132)
- Fast Tracks, jazz, rock, blues,
reggae.
MAIN STREET COMEDY
SHOWCASE (996-9080) - Rita Rud-

ner, stand-up comedy.
THE NECTARINE BALLROOM
(994-5436) - Blushing Brides,
Rolling Stones imitators.
RICK'S AMERICAN CAFE (994-
5436) Blushing Brides, Rolling
Stones imitators.
RICK'S AMERICAN CAFE (996-
2747) 66 Spy, rock 'n' roll.
Speakers
Zheng You Shi - "Existence and
Spectra of Naphthalene Radicals,"
Chemistry, 4 p.m., 1200 Chemistry
Bldg.
Ben Hartman - "Commercial
Brokerage," Real Estate Club, 4:15

p.m., Hale Auditorium.
Dennis Brutus - "The State of
the Struggle for Freedom in South
Africa," 8p.m., Aud. B, Angell Hall.
Arie Van Den Bard - "Blithely
Thinking of the Brave," Germanic
Languages and Literature, 4:10
p.m., East Lecture Room,
Rackham.
Francis Collins - "Gene Mapping
Using the Chromosomes Hopping Ap-
proach," Genetics, noon, 1139
Natural Science Bldg.
Holly Smith - "Demography of
Australopithecus and Early Homo,"
Anthropology, noon, 2009 Museums
Bldg.
Rudolofo Anays - "An American
Chicano in King Arthur's Court,"
Hispanic Lecture Series, 7 p.m.,
Pendleton Room, Union.
How Does Substance Abuse Affect
the Adolescent and the Family -
Catherine McAuley Health Center's
Chemical Dependency
Program /Ann Arbor Public Schools,
7 p.m., Little Theater, Pioneer High
School.
Jeffrey Broadbent - "The
Japanese 'Growth Machine': Social
Sources of 'the Will to Develop' in
Regional Industrialization,"
Japanese Studies, noon, Commons
Room, Lane Hall.
Fred Lehrdahl - "Some Im-
plications of Generative Music
Theory for Literary Studies,"
English, 8 p.m., West Conf. Room,
Rackham.
Deb DeGraff- Dissertation
proposal, Economic Development,
12:15 p.m., Lorch Hall.
Karl Bahm - _ "sudeten-German
Volkssozialismus: Integral
Socialism and the Crisis of Social
Democracy Revisited," Russian and
East European Studies, 7 p.m., 212
Lane Hall.
Tim Crow - "Two Types
Schizophrenia: Neurochemical and
Neuropathology," Psychiatry/Up-
john Company, noon, Child and
Adolescent Psychology Hospital
Auditorium.
Holly Smith - "Demography of
Australopithecus and Early Homo,"
Anthropology, noon, 2009 Museums
Bldg.
Meetings
Hebrew Speaking CLub - 4 p.m.,
206 Angell Hall.
Campus Crusade for Christ - 7
p.m., Hutchins Hall.
University Council - 4 p.m., 3909
Union.
Inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship - "Summer Survival,"
7:30 p.m., Basement Studio, League.
Regents' Meeting - 1 p.m.,
Fleming Administration Bldg.
AIDS and the Worried Well 8 p.m.,
3200 Union.
University Alcoholic Anonymous
- noon, 3200 Union.
Furthermore
International Economic
Development: Problems and
Prospects - Near East and North
African Studies forum, 3 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheater.
Hands Across America Workshop
-6 p.m., 409 Mason Hall.
High blood pressure screening - 1
p.m., lobby, Reichert Health Bldg.,
Clark and Huron River Drive.
Research Series in Adult
Development - CEW, noon, Center
for Continuing Education of Women,
North University and South Thayer.
War on AIDS, not Aid for War -
AIDS Action Alliance rally, noon,
Diag.
Microsoft Word for IBM PC-
Compatible Microcomputers, Part

II - Microcomputer Education
workshop, 8:30 a.m., 3001 School of
Education Bldg.
Macintosh System Selection -
Microcomputer Education
workshop, 10:30 p.m., 4003 School of
Education Bldg.
Belgium and Netherlands Night -
League, 5 p.m., Cafeteria.
Tutoring in math, science and
engineering - Tau Beta Pi, 7 p.m.,
307 Undergraduate Library; 8 p.m.,
3200 Union.
Scottish Country Dancers -
Beginners, 7 p.m.; Intermediates; 8
p.m., Forest Hills Community Cen-
ter.
Bible Study - His House Christian
Fellowship, 7:30 p.m., 925 E. Ann.

By TIM DALY
Congress is considering two bills which would make it
more difficult for students to declare financial indepen-
dence to obtain more government aid. Hundreds of un-
dergraduates could be effected if either bill passes,
University administrators say.
Both the House and the Senate bill increase the length of
time a student must be self-sufficient to declare indepen-
dent status. The changes would go into effect in Septem-
ber, 1987.
CURRENTLY, students are considered independent if
they receive less than $750 a year from their parents, or
live at home less than six weeks a year, and have not been
claimed as a tax exemption by their parents during the
award year plus one previous year.
Under the proposals, independent students must prove
their self-sufficiency for an extra year.
Both bills also extend the Higher Education Act until
1991. This act reauthorizes a variety of education
programs, including financial aid, teacher education
programs, and urban grant programs.
THE HOUSE bills, which passed last November,
eliminates the requirements that students not receive
over $750 a year and not live at home for more than six
weeks. The current Senate bill maintains the requiremen-
ts. Senators are expected to vote on their final bill within
the next month.

Tom Butts, the University's Washington lobbyist, said
people sometimes take advantage of the current
definition of independence, making the requirements
useless. "Families don't always report accurately how
much money they give the student or how much time the
student spends at home," he said.
In addition, the House bill makes all students over 23
years old independent. "This is a real advantage for
students who are 23 or about to turn 23," Butts said.
"However, the House bill makes it much more difficult for
younger students to gain independent status because of
the additional year of self-sufficiency."
There are advantages and disadvantages in being
declared independent. "The main advantage of being
declared an independent is that family resources are not
taken into account when evaluating a student's need,"
said Lynn Borset, assistant financial aid director.
But independent students must rely more heavily on the
self-help category of financial aid to make up for parental
contributions, Borset said. This includes loans and work-
study programs.
Because of this increased reliance on loans, indepen-
dent students are more likely to amass debts. Of 15,156
students who applied for financial aid for the 1984-'85
school year, 2,067 undergraduates and 1,523 graduate
students applied as independents, Borset said.

'U' experts disagree on value of attack

(Continued from Page 1)
"There is no legal basis for the U.S.
attack," Singer said.
Singer attributed the present crisis
to the nations' leaders. "You get two
crazy turkeys like Khadafy and
Reagan, both incompetent as hell,
they're acting like two kids on a
playground."
SINGER belives that there were
non-violent alternatives available to
the United States such as paying more
attention to the underlying causes of
terrorism like the Palestinian
problem.
Singer is especially concerned
about the attack because in two weeks
he will be going to Europe, India, and

Asia on a speaking tour for the State
Department. Singer said, "there's a
good chance I may not come back.
The stupidity and brutality of my own
government puts my life in danger."
In response to the U.S. bombing, the
Soviet Union issued a formal protest,
and cancelled a May meeting between
Secretary of State George Shultz and
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduart
Shevardnadze which was to schedule
the next U.S.-Soviet summit.
History prof. Ronald Suny charac-
terized the Soviet reponse as
"reasonable, moderate, and
minimal."
"They had to react somehow, but
this is nothing serious," he said,

predicting that the cancelled meeting
will be rescheduled.
The United States attack will "still
lead to a cooling of relations, at least
for a while," Suny said. Yet he predic-
ted the Soviets will stay out of the
U.S.-Libyan conflict. "(The Soviets)
are not particularly enamored of
Khadafy. They consider him un-
stable; they keep their distance,"
Suny said.
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All you have to do is march
yourself down to your campus
microcomputer center before May
15th and spend five fun-packed
minutes letting us demonstrate how

INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS:
The Development of an Idea
From Ancient Times Through Ayn Rand
A Speech By:
DR. JOHN RIDPATH

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