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April 11, 1986 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-04-11

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, April 11, 1986 -Page 3"

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Ex-building director sues 'U'

.4

By MELISSA BIRKS
A former University employee was back in
Federal District Court yesterday presenting the
same race discrimination suit against the Univer-
sity that was thrown out of court in 1980.
Sixty-three-year-old Mildred Morris, the former
director of Stockwell Hall, is suing the University
for wages she did not receive since she was fired in
1977, and compensation for mental anguish and
humiliation. She also is requesting that she be
reinstated in her position.
The University contends Morris was fired for in-
competence and insubordination. Morris claims
discrimination began when she was transferred
from director of Oxford Housing to Stockwell in
1974. In response to the move, she filed a civil
rightsgrievance with the University and as a
result "a lot of things happened to her," said her
attorney, James McGinnis.
IN THE STOCKWELL position, Morris was
singled out and ordered not to make carbon copies
of anything without an administrator's approval;
her boss Kathleen Beauvais made a secret file on
her; and she was ordered to submit agendas for
Stockwell meetings to her superiors for approval,
McGinnis said.
But University attorney Robert Vercruysse said

'When you consider the
fact that she didn't know
her son was working at
the desk and then her son
testifies that he would say
hi to his mom every day, I
don't think that she's a
very reliable witness.'
- Robert Vercruysse
University attorney
the only thing that led to Morris' termination was
poor job performance.
"She didn't do a good job as housing director,"
he said, citing reports that Morris was late to
meetings and in getting out reapplication forms to

students, and that she violated the University's.
nepotism policy by hiring her son as a Stockwell
desk clerk.
"WHEN YOU consider the fact that she didn't
know her son was working at the desk and then her -m,
son testifies that he would say 'hi' to his mom
every day, I don't think that she's a very reliable
witness," Vercruysse said.
After Morris was fired, the Equal Employment
Opportunity Commission ruled that she could sue
the University under the employment
discrimination section of the Civil Rights Act.
Before filing a suit, Morris attempted to recon-
cile with the University by making an appoin-
tment with University President Harold Shapiro.
A University attorney canceled the meeting.
"I was forced to file at that point," Morris said.
But the case Morris filed in 1980 was thrown out--,
of court before going to trial by Federal District
Judge John Feikens, who did not think Morris had
a case.
In 1982 Morris won an appeal for a rehearing
and her case was reinstated in the Federal:
District Court. Judge Feikens agreed to hear the'.
trial, which finally began last week.
Morris will rest her case today after five days of-
cross-examination by the University while the
judge hears the University's side.

Spring cleaning
Rob Fischer prepares the fountain
operation later this month.,

Daily Photo by JOHN MUNSON
outside of the Burton Tower for

Congress weakens gun
From AP and UPI control advocates won their own vic- Cong
WASHINGTON - The House voted tory when lawmakers crushed, on a natio
overwhelmingly yesterday to weaken 233-184 vote, a measure to allow the "cop
the gun control law that was passed in interstate sale of handguns and, in a HE
1968 after the assassinations of Robert voice vote, banned sales of machine disag
Kennedy and Martin Luther King guns. sport
Jr., but retained a ban on interstate Hubert Williams, director of the tioni
handgun sales. Police Foundation, said the House tions
The vote came after hundreds of vote on handguns was a "major of g
uniformed policemen roamed the defeat for the NRA" that "rips the tions
Capitol as lobbyists, heart out" of the bill. Police officers Bu
In a victory for the National Rifle spent days walking the halls of the C
Association, lawmakers voted 292-130
to ease the nation's gun law, which the h mnvrl
o asr obaonsnunanawhWe he Universityof Midh
powerful lobby group argued unfairlyofM c
penalized"hunters, sportsmen, andgun Iceof
dealers.
THE SENATE, which passed a billia
last year to allow interstate handgun ((d''
sales and ease other controls, can ac- .iid
cept the House bill or insist on a
House-Senate conference. 2011 Student Activities Building
For weeks, the legislation produced
high drama, climaxing with police
from 21 states arriving in uniform to To ensure consideration for finan
confront the experienced lobbying must submit their application ma
eas ratonm ndt National Rifle received by the Office of Financia
NRA chief lobbyist Wayne LaPierre to ACT by
pointed to the bill's lifting of an inter- TUES
state sales ban for rifles and shotguns
and federal guarantees that all
lawfully held weapons canbetaken- *University Grant, Michigan Opportunit
unloaded and inaccessible - across Study, National Direct Student Loan, Ht
state lines. Guaranteed Student Loans or Pell Gran
THE NRA also approves, he said,
of provisions that would make it more OFFICE HOURS:
difficult to prosecute unintentional O
gun law violations, allow dealers to Mon.- Fri. 8:15-11:45 and 1:00-4:00
transfer guns from inventories to Thurs. 10:00-11:45 and 1:00-4:00
their private collections, and force the
government to return seized weapons
after an acquittal.
But police groups and other gun d. .5 ." A -

;ress to talk against easing the
in's gun laws, saying the bill was
killer" legislation.
SAID police officers strongly
greed with the interstate tran-
tation provisions, with a reduc-
in the number of federal inspec-
of gun dealers and the transfer
uns to dealers' private collec-
s.
t John Snyder, chief lobbyist of
Citizens Committee for the Right

Wigan

control legislation

FALL & WINTER 1986-87
APPLICATION DEADLINE
TUESDAY, APRIL 15, 1986

to Keep and Bear Arms called the"
vote "an historic victory for
America's tens of millions of law-
abiding gun owners, a smashing suc-
cess for a genuine people's lobby."
"The vote signifies a beginning
shift in congressional attitudes on a
whole range of issues associated -with
the right of law-abiding citizens to
keep and bear arms for legitimate
purposes."

Tram may zip through A2

(Continued from Page 1)

years, and in 1985 covered
3,686,000,000 miles and carried more

But Collins said Ann Arbor officials than 29.5 million passengers without a
will study all aspects of the trains single accident.
before approving plans for an Ann The French TGV (Tres Grande
Arbor stop. He cited the speed of the Vitesse) trains travel in excess of 150
trains as a possible safety concern_,. kph and cover more than 120,000
The high speed rail system would be kilometers each day, and the
modeled after those already Shinkansen Bullet Train has carried
operating in other parts of the world.j more than 2 billion passengers in 12
The British HST (High Speed Train) ,, years. Neither train system has ever
has been in operation for more than 15 had an accident.
TNI- LIST
appears in Weekend magazine every Friday.
p.

cial aid* for the coming school year, continuing students
aterials by the priority deadline. The application must be
al Aid and the 1986-87 Family Financial Statement mailed
DAY, APRIL 15, 1986
y Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, College Work-
iealth Professions Loan, Nursing Loan. The deadline does not apply to
t applications.

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