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March 21, 1986 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-21

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 21, 1986 -Page 3

Handicap policy works,

By AMY MINDELL
The University goes beyond its
lawful duty to comply with laws that
affect handicapped people, according
to a report which the office of Affir-
mative Action issued earlier this
week,
One of the University's goals is to
make all University programs ac-
cessible to people with handicaps.
But this does not mean all campus
builidings, according to Virginia Nor-
dby, director of the office.
SHE SAID one way of acheiving this
goal would be to change a class
meeting place to an accessible
locations. This would be a low-cost

solution, she said at yesterday's
University Board of Regents meeting.
Nordby calls the report the "first
comprehensive assessment" in the
area, as a past evaluations was not
published. But the report doesn't
make specific recommendations,
"because there needs to be more
discussion around the University,"
Nordby said.
The University has spent almost $2
million during the past decade on ex-
tensive renovations to older buildings.
The renovations include special
doors, ramps, and elevators.
EVERY TIME a new building
renovation begins, the planners make

sure it is accessable to the handicap-
ped, Nordby said.
Federal laws require the University
to provide aids such as tape recorders
for students with visual impairment
or limited dexterity, or a note-taker or
interpreters for deaf students.
The University's affirmative action
office distributes a handbook con-
taining floor plans of 10 Central Cam-
pus buildings and special facilities.
Staff at the University's libraries are
prepared to help users whose handic-
aps prevent them from reaching
books, for example, and there are
special busses for transportation.
DEBORAH CORBY, an ad-

'U 'says
ministrator at the office of Disabled
Students Services in the Union said
that the services offered by the
University are helpful, but still (have)
some problems, such as the lack of
funding.
"The office offers a fair amount of
services, ... but its hard to know - I
am not disabled," she said last night.
Although the University does not
require students to register as han-
dicapped, 53 students have identified
themselves as handicapped this year.
It is difficult to obtain exact num-
bers of people with handicapping con-
ditions for many reasons, Nordby
said.

School system offers perks for teachers

Associated Press

A Washington, D.C. policeman arrests an unknown man who was plan-
ting corn on Capitol Hill grounds yesterday to protest Contra aid and
Reagan's farm policy.
ea ker says marijuana
afe; should be legalized

UPPER MARLBORO, Md., (AP) -
Teachers needing jobs will find a free
month's rent, cheaper car loans and
discounts at local restaurants if they
apply to the Prince George's County
schools in suburban Washington by
August 1, say officials trying
desperately to fill 400 positions.
The unusual offer was the brain-
child of local business leaders who
have been working with the school
system the last two years under the
philosophy that good schools mean
good business.
"The school system is the heart of
the community," said Winfield Kelly,
president of the Advisory Council for
Business and Industry, which
organized the program. "If it is strong
and healthy than everyone else in the
community will benefit."
He predicts that if the program

works, "some of the brightest and
most gifted teachers in the Northeast
will be coming here."
"Just like everyone, we are cm-
peting for a small number of ap-
plicants," said Jacquelyn Lendsey,
spokesman for the Prince George's
County school system, which, at full
force, has about 5,000 teachers.
The 103,000-pupil system has the
lowest starting salary in the
metropolitan area - $15,738 - though
the amount will rise to $19,000 next
year. Mrs. Lendsey said the raise
"makes us competitive."
"But we are also going to have an
extra edge by offering these discoun-
ts," she said. "We need to use the
techniques that have been successful
in business."
Ater words

Extras the new teachers will
recieve include:
a month's free rent at their choice
of 12 apartment complexes, which
also will waive security deposits.
discounts on all consumer and auto
loans and bank credit cards without
an annual fee at two local banks.
a 20 percent discount at three
restaurant chains in the area.
summer employment in
professional positions wiht local

businesses.
The National Center for Education
Statistics predicts that the national
teacher drought that already exists
will accelerate and, by 1992, the
schools could be 232,000 teachers short
of the number needed.
Howard Carroll, spokesman for the
National Education Association, said
a big push is on nationally to involve
business and industry in the schools.

By JOHN DUNNING
Strict drug laws inhibit Americans'
right to smoke marijuana, according
to Chuck Kile, the state coordinator of
the National Organization for the
Reform of Marijuana Laws.
Kile, who started smoking
fmarijuana when he was 35, spoke to a
small audience in the Kuenzel room ot
:the Union last night. "If you're an
'adult and want to do drugs, that's
,your business," he said.
Kile asserted that marijuana is no
'more of a health hazzard than any
:other controlled substance. "In 1984,
:68.8 percent of drug overdoses were
'from pharmaceutical drugs," he said.
"Why are people who smoke
marijuana treated worse than anyone
selse, when medical people are tellint
bus cigarettes are more dangerous?"
Kile asked. He said that most
negative remarks about marijuana
are unjustified.
"I think people who smoke
.marijuana are no more dangerous
'than those who drink," Kile said.
*"The same people who are trying to
:throw us in jail drink. Today, 50 to 90
1recent of driving fatalities are
alcohol-related."
Finding solutions to the present
drug laws is one of Kile's major con-
:cerns. "I find that half the population
gis involved with marijuana. I can't
-for the life of me figure why they want
to make criminals out of us," he said.
"I have managed to accumulate ar-
,ticles from magazines and papers,
,and there is no link to crime or violen-
ce with marijuana use."
According to Kile, the stigma at-
tached to marijuana comes from a
few people's irrational views. "Kids
'are getting stoned, telling their paren-
ts they've been smoking marijuana,
;but not telling them they've really
been doing PCP."
"PCP scared the hell out of me,"
*Kile explained, adding that "I'm not
,for legalizing all drugs. When
:marijuana is readily available and
;cheap, the hard drug use declines."
According to Kile, "This is sup-
OUSE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

posed to be a free country. Sitting in
your house smoking a joint is no
reason for the police to kick in your
door and take you to jail."

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They loved.
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MARY TYLER MOORE CHR
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