100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 21, 1986 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 21, 1986

4

Raliers build shanty in an apartheid protest

By STEVE HERZ
and MICHAEL LUSTIG
A nationwide protest against apar-
theid began on the Diag yesterday as
the Freee South Africa Coordinating
Committee (FSACC) constructed a
shanty that will remain on the center
of campus until April 6.
Committee coordinator Barbara
Ransby began the National Weeks of
Action Against Racism and Apartheid

with a rallying speech condemning
University policies in South Africa.
"We are going to build a shanty on the
diag," said Ransby, "We are going to
try to save this University from
carrying out its policies in South
Africa."
THE UNIVERSITY has divested all
but 1 percent of its holdings in com-
panies that do business with South
Africa. University faculty and staff,

however, last year contributed $15
million to a pension fund that holds $6
billion in South Africa-related in-
vestments. The Universtiy also con-
tributed $31 to the pension plan
through its general fund.
Ransby, whose coalition also ad-
dressed the Board of Regents yester-
day, said, "The University's position
is unacceptable and immoral. If the
regents really are against apartheid,

Daily Photo by CHRIS TWIGG

Three protesters build a shanty in symbolic protest against apartheid in South Africa and racism at home.

- --.....-----.---.-.-------- - - --....- I
COOKIES 4
NIGHT OWLS TAKE A STUDY BREAK! I
Buy 2 or more of Mrs. Peabody's cookies
or brownies after 9:00 p.m. and get
a FREE beverage!
Open till 11 p.m. doily COUPON MUST BE '
715 N. University PRESENTED WITH PURCHASE
761CHIP OFFER VALID THROUGH
I6IHPMAY 2,1986 '
** * * ** * ####** ** ****
* OPENING ON AN LSA STUDENT *
* GOVERNMENT COMMITTEE*
Joint Student Faculty Policy Committee *
CALL OR STOP BY:
LSA STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE
4003 MICHIGAN UNION 763-4799 *
UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER
COMMITTEE CHAIR APPLICATIONS

Cult
members
not social
misfits
By SUZY ROSTLER
People who join cults are not
necessarily social misfits, but are
looking to change their lives, Rev.
Galen Hora of the Lord of Light
Lutheran Church told a group of
students at South Quad earlier this
week.
"It's just not the social misfit that is
attracted to cults," Hora said during a
two-day presentation that provided
students with information about
alternative religious groups such as
the Hare Krsnas, the Unification
Church, and the Baghwans. "The
people who join cults are fed up with
who they are, and in order to make a
change in their lives, they affiliate
themselves with a radically different
group than who they grew up with."
Although Hora could not estimate
the number of University students
involved in cults, he guessed that it is
smaller than in other parts of the
country.
"At South Dakota State University,
for example, there is more of a
problem with cults. Students are
coming out of naive congregations
and are searching for simple answers
to new and complex problems," he
said.
. Hora believes that students turn to
alternative religious organizations
because they provide students with
"definite answers to very complex
questions.'
"The word cult is used when a group
is following a man rather than God,"
said John Williams of the Unification
Church.
Williams joined the Unification
Church in 1973, during a time when he
See REV., Page 10

we want to see that translated into
concrete policy. The University
autonomy is not more important than
the lives of our brothers and sisters in
South Africa."
Ransby said her group will demand
that the regents divest the Univer-
sity's remaining half million dollars
of South African investments. "A
former South African president once
said, 'Every dollar invested in South
Africa is a brick in the wall of apar-
theid.' We want the University to
divest its remaining money, remove
that brick, and break down the wall."
RANSBY said the committee
received a letter from University Vice
President for Student Services Henry
Johnson saying the administration
will allow the shanty to stand for the
two-week rally because "the Univer-
sity sees it as an educational
mission."~
Ransby said she was not par-
ticularly worried about recent events
at Dartmouth College, where about a
dozen students who worked for the
See PROTESTERS, Page 10
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State 662-4536
Sunday - 9:30 & 11:00 Worship and
Church School
9:30 broadcast on WNRS 1290 AM
11:00 broadcast on WAAM 1600 AM
Sun. sermon title, "A Man For All
Sorrows" by Dr. Donald B. Strobe.
Maundy Thursday 7:00 p.m. Holy
Communion.
Fri. 12:30 - 2:00: Union Good Friday
Services.
Fri. 7:30 p.m. Dr. Strobe's Adult Class
* * *
WESLEY FOUNDATION
602 E. Huron St. (at State)
United Methodist Campus Ministry
College class - Sundays 10:45 a.m.
Sunday Evening Supper &
Fellowship - 5 p.m .
Bible Study - Mondays 6 p.m.,
Fridays noon.
Holy Communion - Wednesdays
9:30 p.m.
Rev. Wayne Large, Chaplain.
Telephone: 668-6881.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw
663-5560
Dr. Paul Foelber, Interim Pastor
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Sunday Worship 9:15 and 10:30
Bible Study 9:15 Sunday
Lenten Worhship 7:30 Wednesday
Sunday Supper 6:00
* * *
COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
Sunday Service:
9:30 a.m. at Mack School 920 Miller,
Ann Arbor
10:45 a.m. Sunday School and
Adult Bible Study
Philip H. Tiews, Pastor
For more information call 761-1999.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave., 662-4466
(between S. University and Hill)
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Coffee Hour - 10:30 social hall
Adult Education Classes during both
services
Campus Group: Coordinator - Jamie

Schultz
Meets for Communion 7 p.m. Wednes-
days. Program follows at 7:30.
Dr. William Hillegonds - Sr. Minister
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St. (between State & Division)
Sundays: 9:55 worship, 11:25 Bible
Study groups for both Undergrads and
Graduate Students.
Thursdays: 5:30 Supper (free) and
Fellowship.
CENTER OPEN EACH DAY
for information call 663-9376
ROBERT B. WALLACE, PASTOR
* * *
CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division St. (at Catherine)
EPISCOPAL CAMPUS MINISTRY
Sundays at 5:00 p.m.
MEDITATIVE EUCHARIST, fol-
lowed by a simple meal and discussion
group.
Rev. Andrew Foster, Chaplain
Telephone: 665-0606

IN BRIEF
COMPILED FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS AND
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS
IBM wants charges dropped
against Brown protesters
PROVIDENCE, R.I. - IBM asked a judge yesterday to dismiss
trespassing charges against Amy Carter and 13 other college students
who staged an anti-apartheid protest at its office.
IBM Branch manager Leonard DiIuro told District Judge Francis
Darrigan the company wanted to drop the charges "for business
reasons." He refused to elaborate to reporters afterward.
City police arrested the students Wednesday about 30 minutes after
they began a sit-in protesting IBM's dealings in racially segregated South
Africa. They were released on personal recognizance.
The protesters had said they would stay in the IBM building until they
were arrested or until the company stopped doing business in South
Africa.
The demonstrators are members of Borwn Free Southern Africa
Coalition. Carter, the youngest of former President Jimmy Carter's four
children, has been a coalition member since coming to Brown in Septem-
ber 1985.
Mitterand appoints Paris
mayor as new premier
PARIS - Francois Mitterand, a Socialist, appointed conservative
Jacques Chirac as France's new premier yesterday, and the nation began
its novel experiment in cooperation between two leaders from rival
political camps.
It is the first time the president and his government have renresented
opposite political philosophies since Charles deGaulle created the Fifth
Republic, with its strong presidency, 28 years ago.
Mitterand and Chirac have pledged to cooperate, but the stage is set for
an eventual constitutional conflict. Mitterand's presidential term runs
until 1988.
The new premier made clear that he plans to exercise all the con-
stitutional powers of his office and government to set and execute
national policy, much of which will be aimed at reversing Mitterand's
Socialist course.
He said he would move immediately with' economic measures, in-
cluding a start on selling state-run industries to private investors, and the
most urgent measures would be implemented by decree.
Bomb blast kills two in Paris
PARIS - A bomb exploded at a shopping mall on the Champs Elysees
boulevard in central Paris, killing two people and injuring 28. It was the
latest of a series of bombings in the capital.
Police sources said a second bomb was found a short time later on the
tracks in Paris' main underground subway and regional train station.
Several thousand rush-hour passengers were evacuated from the station
while a bomb squad neutralized the device, according to the sources who
stipulated anonymity.
There was no immediate word on property damage at the Point Show
arcade.
Fire Department officials said at least 15 people were injured. The of-
ficials, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said they did not know how
seriously the injured were hurt.
The explosion occurred minutes after it was announced that Jacques
Chirac, the mayor of Paris, had accepted Socialist President Francois
Mitterand's offer to become premier of France and form a government.
Chirac, a conservative, was speaking on national television when the.
blast took place at about 6 p.m.
NYC passes gay rights bill
NEW YORK - The City Council approved a gay rights bill yesterday,
15 years after a similar bill was first introduced in the early days of the
homosexual rights movement.
The bill would prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation in
housing, employment or public accommodation.
More than 100 police officers were assigned around City Hall as suppor-
ters and opponents gathered to await the vote.
The gay rights bill grew out of a police raid on a gay bar, the Stonewall,
whichmset off riots in 1969 and is considered the flashpoint of the
movement.
Among the leaders of the battle were Roman Catholic Cardinal John
O'Connor, who denounced the bill, and Episcopal Bishop Paul Moore, who
supported it. Mayor Edward Koch was also in favor.
Councilman Noach Dear said he though homosexuals had pressed for
the legislation because "they want society to accept them as normal
human beings. I don't accept that. That's deviant behavior and they will
pass it on to our children."
Aquino drafts new constitution
MANILA, Philippines - The draft of a new, interim Philippine con-
stitution would abolish the National Assembly and vest all law-making.,
powers in President Corazon Aquino in a democratic revolutionary
government, it was disclosed yesterday.
A cabinet official, who dealt; with reporters on condition of anonymity,
said Aquino wants to "soften some provisions" of the draft so she does not

have to call her government "revolutionary."
The official said Aquino planned to announce the new constitution Mon-
day. He did not say why he released the draft yesterday.
The draft says, "This government is revolutionary in origin and nature,
democratic in essence and transistory in character."
It would give Aquino the law-making powers of the National Assembly
and would prohibit any court from questioning her authority or the
validity of any law she decrees.
Vol. XCVI- No. 116
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April-$18 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One term-$10 in
town; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and subscribes
to United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times
Syndicate, and College Press Service.

41

A

14

14

11

A

4

MUSKET
Soph Show
Mediatrics
Michigras
Minicourses
Viewpoint Lectures
Soundstage
Laughtrack

Impact Jazz
Comedy Company
College Bowl
Starbound
Homecoming
Special Events
Tech. Crew
Ticket Central

A

Applications available at the UAC
offices, 2nd floor Michigan Union. Return
by noon, Monday, March 31. Interviews to
be held Tuesday & Wednesday, April 1 & 2.
For more info, call 763-1107.

14

REGISTERED NURSES
C ontinue your professional development in an atmosphere of encouragement at...
White Plains Hospital Medical Center

I

Open
House

Tuesday, April 1, 1986
1:30pm-7:00pm
N- Appointment Necessary.
Just Stop By Anytime

Complimentary buffet served throughout the day and evening/On the spot inter-
views with nursing management/Unit Tours/Speak w ith Staff RN's
White Plains Hospital Medical Center is one of Westchester's most prestigious
hospital medical centers located in a beautiful suburban location just 35 minutes from
NYC and just a short distance from major ski resorts and the Long Island Sound. We
offer the following benefits:
Professional Pluses: Personal Benefits:
" Primary Nursing e Tuition Assistance
* Staff Development Programs Ongoing " Non-Contributory Pension/
" Individualized Orientation Life Insurance
" Decentralized Nursing Department " 20 Vacation Days + 13 Holidays +
" Internal Opportunities 12 Sick Days
" Preceptor Program " Permanent Shifts
Enjoy the personal environment of a prestigious medical center and the hospital
of choice in Westchester. Excellent benefits and competitive salaries. For more informa-
tion contact: Jan Thomson, RN, Professional Recruiter
(914) 681-1100
D White Plains Hospital
E , Medical Center
Davis Ave at East Post Road
White Plains, NY 10601
Fqual Opportunity Employer MF

Editor in Chief.............ERIC MATTSON
Managing Editor.........RACHEL GOTTLIEB
News Editor ............... JERRY MARKON
Features Editor............ CHRISTY RIEDEL
NEWS STAFF: Eve Becker, Melissa Birks, Laura
Bischoff, Rebecca Blumenstein, Marc Carrel, Dov
Cohen, Adam Cort, Laura Coughlin, Tim Daly,
Nancy Driscoll, Rob Earle, Ellen Fiedelholtz, Amy
Goldstein,'Susan Grant, Stephen Gregory. Steve
Herz, Mary Chris Jaklevic, Philip Levy, Michael
Lustig, Amy Mindell, Caroline Muller, Kery Mura-
kami, Jill Oserowsky, Joe Pigott,hKurt Serbus,
Martha Sevetson, Wendy Sharp, Cheryl Wistrom.
Opinion Page Editor............KAREN KLEIN
Associate Opinion Page Editor... HENRY PARK
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Gayle Kirshenbaum,
Peter Ephross, David Lewis, Peter Mooney,
Susanne Skubik.
Arts Editor................NOELLE BROWER
Associate Arts Editor..........BETH FERTIG
Books ................. REBECCA CHUNG
Film.....................SETH FLICKER
Features......................ALAN PAUL
Weekend Magazine Editor ........ JOHN LOGIE

Sports Editor............... BARB McQUADE
Associate Sports Editors. DAVE ARETHA,
MARK BOROWSKY, RICK KAPLAN,
ADAM MARTIN, PHIL NUSSEL
SPORTS STAFF: Emily Bridgham, Debbie
deFrances, Liam Flaherty, Jon Hartmann, Darren
Jasey, Christian Martin, Scott Miller, Greg
Molzon, Jerry Muth, Adam Ochlis, Duane Roose,
Jeff Rush, Adam Schefter, Scott Shaffer, Pete
Steinert, Douglas Volan.
Business Manager.........DAWN WILLACKER
Display Sales Manager ...... CYNTHIA NIXON
Assistant Sales Manager.. KATHLEEN O'BRIEN
Classified Manager .....GAYLA BROCKMAN
Finance Manager...........MIKE BAUGHMAN
Marketing Manager............JAKE GAGNON
DISPLAY SALES: Eda Benjakul, Diane Bloom,
Phil Educate, Albert Ellenich, Debbie Feit, Mason
Franklin, Heidi Freeman, Traci Garfinkel, John
Graff, Jennifer Heyman, Beth Horowitz, Debra Led-
erer, Parker Moon, Carol Muth, Debra Silverman,
David Zirin.
CLASSIFIED SALES: Katharine Beitner, Cindy

4r

m !T I1 1

w

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan