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March 04, 1986 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-04

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4

Women's Tennis
vs. Calvin College
Today, 4 p.m.
Track and Tennis Building

SPORTS

Men's Basketball
vs. Ohio State
Thursday, 7:30 p.m.
PASS TV

The Michigan Daily
GRAPPLERS FINISH THIRD A T BIG TENS

Tuesday, March 4, 1986

Page 8

Trost is toast of

Blue Lines

By PETE STEINERT
Nineteen seventy-three marks the
last time a Michigan wrestling team
won a Big Ten championship. And for
that matter, it marks the last
time anyone besides Iowa has won the
crown.
The Hawkeyes, to the surprise of no
one, won their 13th consecutive title
last weekend in Minneapolis, Minn.,
finishing well ahead of second-place
Wisconsin and the third-place
Wolverines.
NO SURPRISES either in the
heavyweight division where top-
seeded Kirk Trost of Michigan
breezed to the championship by
defeating Indiana's Bill Paxton, 13-1
in the finals.
"It feels better than losing," said
the first-time winner. "It's a good
honor, but I'm more concerned with
the nationals because it's more
significant."
"He wasn't challenged in the tour-
nament," commented Michigan
coach Dale Bahr. "We feel he
definitely has a chance to win the
NCAA championship."
TROST LEADS the team in wins
with 39 (versus six losses), and he
finished the Big Ten season with a per-
fect 12-0 record.
Joining Trost at the NCAA Cham-
pionships will be teammates William
Waters (placed third at 118 pounds),
Doug Wyland (fifth, 126), Kevin Hill
(third, 177), and Scott Rechsteiner
(second, 190).
Rechsteiner's unlucky number has
been two in Big Ten competition. This
year's second seed finished second in
the Big Ten's for the third straight
year, losing in the finals to top-seeded
Duane Goldman of Iowa, 10-1.
HILL'S BID for the championship
ended in the semi-finals where he lost,
2-3, to Michigan State's Dave

Mariola, whom he had beaten during
the regular season.
"Mariola was in better shape this
time," noted Bahr, "and he also had
the revenge factor on his side."
Carrying a 2-0 lead into the final
period of his semi-final match, Waters
wound up losing to Mark Clayton of
Wisconsin, 4-2. "He didn't wrestle a
strong last period, and that cost him a
chance to go to the finals," said Bahr.
ALTHOUGH WYLAND did not
finish in the top four in his weight
class, which is necessary to qualify
for the NCAA's, he earned himself one
of two wild card spots. Wyland beat
Illinois' Mike O'Brien, 4-2, to clinch

tourney
the fifth-place spot in what was
probably the most competitive weight
class in the tournament.
Wyland won in dramatic fashion,
overcoming a 2-1 deficit in the final 20
seconds. "It was a do-or-die situation
and he just threw the kid off of him
and reversed him," said Bahr. "You
could just see the determination on his
face."
The final tally saw Iowa with 169.75
points followed by Wisconsin (95) and
Michigan (75.5).
"Iowa was by far the class of the
tournament," said Bahr, "but I'm
pleased with our third-place finish. On
paper that's where we belong."

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By RICK KAPLAN
They took a wrong turn at Chicago.
The Wolverines' hockey season went downhill star-
ting with their series at Illinois-Chicago on the
weekend of January 31-February 1. That two-game set
was the beginning of Michigan's ten-game losing
streak that brought the season to an end last weekend
at Michigan State in the first round of the Central
Collegiate Hockey Association playoffs.
Michigan travelled to the Windy City in a three-way
tie with Illinois-Chicago and Ferris State for the sixth
place in the nine-team conference. The trio all had 20
points, but the Wolverines had the best won-lost record
at 10-14 in the CCHA, 12-16 overall. Michigan trailed fif-
th-place Ohio State by just four points, and it was still in
shouting range of fourth-place Lake Superior.
Coach Red Berenson's team seemingly was moving
in the right direction. In the three weeks prior to the
Chicago trip, Michigan had won at Bowling Green
when the Falcons were ranked number one in the
nation, split with defending national champion RPI,
and split with arch-rival and nationally-ranked
Michigan State.
Optimism was on the rise, and the confidence level
was higher than it had ever been in Berenson's two
seasons as coach.
The Chicago series proved to be the beginning of the
end, however. The Flames swept the Wolverines, 4-2
and 7-4. Despite the score, the second game was a
demoralizing blow out.
The confidence was shot heading into the next series,
a home affair with Lake Superior. Had Michigan still
been on a roll, it probably would have salvaged a split
with the Lakers. Instead, Lake Superior continued its
jinx over the Wolverines, taking both games, 6-3 and 7-
1, to win its ninth and tenth straight contests against
Michigan.
In the Saturday game, the Lakers dominated, as
Michigan was held under two goals for the only time
this season.
The Wolverines closed the regular season with two
losses to Ohio State and a pair of defeats against
Western Michigan. They finished in eighth place, at 10-
22 CCHA, 12-26 overall, with the same 20 points they
had before Chicago.
In the final weeks of the regular season, Berenson
was asked what would be his team's motivation after
they were eliminated from home ice in the playoffs,
and then when they clinched the eighth seed with a
week to go. Each time he answered, "We need to win to
get some momentum going into the playoffs."
The wins never came.

A long slide...
...for 'M'icers
As expected, Michigan S t ate swept Michigan in the
best-of-three quarterfinal playoff series, 4-3 and 5-2.
The Wolverines played well, especially defensively,
but without the momentum Berenson desired, they
could not match the regular-season champion Spar-
tans.
The end came in East Lansing, but it began in
Chicago.
A final look at the '85-'86 Wolverines:
Forwards: Junior center Brad Jones (28-39-67) was
named to the All-CCHA Second Team. Jones tied for
ninth in the conference in scoring. He had a fine
season, but the team could have used more consistency
from its top scorer. Sophomores Brad McCaughey (24-
26-50) and Billy Powers (15-28-43), and freshman Todd
Brost should be offensive mainstays for years to come.
Justice prevailed when captain Frank Downing (20-
9-29) scored his 20th goal with 1:28 left in the final play
off game. The senior right winger epitomized what a
captain should be, and he was the only unanimous
selection to the CCHA All-Academic Team. Leading
the team in even-strength goals was a bonus from the
Business Administration major with a 3.43 GPA.
Offense was the team's strong suit, as it increased its
power play conversion percentage from 126 last year
to .248 this year.
Defense: Sophomore Jeff Norton and freshman Myles
O'Connor give the Wolverines a strong duo on the blue
line for the future. Senior Pat Goff developed into the
team's best defensive defenseman. Senior Todd Carlile
did not change his reputation as a good offensive
defenseman.
Overall, the defense was a major weakness and must
take a large part of the blame for Michigan's league-
leading 222 goals against.
Goalies: Starting goaltender Bob Lindgren was
declared academically ineligible after the fall term,
leaving to sophomore Tim Makris and freshman Mike
Rossi the thankless task of minding Michigan's net.
Makris (7-16, 5.48 GAA) played poorly, but showed oc-
casional brilliance. His play in wins at Bowling Green
and against Michigan State in January was among the
season highlights. Rossi (1-4, 6.37), a walk-on, im-
proved towards year's end, but he still had the highest
GAA in the conference.
Despite their lack of defensive support, shoddy play
by the goalies doomed the team to a dismal finish.
Coaches: Berenson, assistant coach Mark Miller and
graduate assistant Dave Debol were three of the
greatest offensive players in Michigan hockey history.
They have begun to turn the offense around. Perhaps
the addition of a full-time defense or goalie coach could
bring the team back into contention in the future.

Daily Photo by JOHN MUNSON
Michigan sophomore William Waters puts his Indiana opponent in a bind
in action earlier this season. Waters placed third at last weekend's Big
Ten Championships in the 118-pound division, qualifying him for the
NCAA meet.

Bradetich on ire
By LIAM FLAHERTY Wendy Bradetich raised herg
a new level, and pulled along h
Basketball is considered the erine teammates on the way.
ultimate team game. However, THE MICHIGAN women'
anyone who has watched Michael won two out of three games, cl
Jordan or Scott Skiles recently can on their most satisfying sea
. tell you that an individual can take recent years.
over agame and oftenwinit single- The week did not begin
handedly. Women's basketball, at promising fashion, however,
least east of Cheryl Miller, is rarely Wolverines lost to Michigan S
subject to such solitary displays. 70. Late in the contest, with M
. Last week, though, senior forward down 71-70, Wolverine guard

fo
game to
er Wolv
s squad
osing in
sons in
in such
as the
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ichigan
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Lilly drove to the hoop. According to
Michigan coach Bud Van De Wege she
was "fouled on the ground and on the
shot." Van De Wege then put in a late
bid for an Oscar by getting three
technicals in a row. Van De Wege
maintained he was fully aware of
what he was doing, and said (with
tongue firmly in cheek) that he
merely wanted to "indicate to the
oficials that he thought they missed

one." Bradetich, with her week-long
outburst just beginning, led the
Wolverine scoring attack with 25 poin-
ts.
On Friday the Wolverines, in con-
trol the whole way, defeated Wiscon-
son, 77-66.Bradetich was high scorer
with 30 points, tied for rebounding
honors with seven and led Michigan
with four assists. The Wolverines
went to the foul line 27 times, a season
high.
ON SUNDAY the Wolverines, in
their last home game of the year, top-
ped Northwestern, 80-66. Van De
Wege called the ample margin of vic-
tory "deceptive." It was very close
and hard fought game till we scored.
six straight points toward the end."
Leading the late Wolverine charge
was, of course, Bradetich. She led
four Wolverines in a double figures
with 28 points. Senior forward Sandy
Svoboda contributed a career high 17.
Van De Wege could not say enough
about his team and especially his
departing star. "Wendy has been
doing it all," he said. "She's hit the
jumper, and has been great in the
transition game and in posting people
up. She just became Michigan's
second leading scorer of all time and
this is the best she's ever played."
As for his team, which is now
assured of its first .500 record since
1982, Van De Wege says it feels "a
real sense of accomplishment. "I
especially feel good for the seniors,
who are going out on a winning note.
They've seen the bad times here as
well."
The way the Wolverines are rolling
the bad times never seemed so far
away.

By EMILY BRIDGHAM
Taking third and sixth respectively,
the Michigan men's and women's
track teams held their own against
the best talent in the Big Ten Satur-
day.
Grabbing the four individual titles
amongst other accolades, the men's
team managed to take third with 68
points in the Big Ten Championship.
Maintaining greater depth, Wisconsin
and the Illini were able to edge out the
Wolverines with scores of 85 and 81.

AP Top Twenty
1. Duke (62)..........29-2
2. Kansas (1) ...........28-3
3. Kentucky ............ 26-3
4. North Carolina......26-4
5. St. John's ............27-4
6. Georgia Tech......23-5
7. MICHIGAN.........25-4
8. Syracuse ............23-4
9. Bradley .............30-1
10. Memphis State ......25-4
11. Louisville ...........24-7
12. Notre Dame........21-5
13. Nevada-Las Vegas ..28-4
14. Georgetown .........22-6
15. Oklahoma ...........24-6
16. Indiana............20-6
17. Michigan State.......20-6
18. Navy ...............25-4
19. Illinois ..............20-8
20. N. Carolina State ...18-11

Tracksters third in

L

OMAR Davidson certainly held his
own, scrapping his time down to 46.61
in the 400-meters and earning a first-
place finish. He was later named co-
athlete of the meet for this endeavour.
"My strategy was to come out of the
blocks fast," said Davidson. "I tur-
ned it on right away because I thought
it was my best chance of winning. I
have never started that fast before."
Following Davidson's lead, Butch
Starmack also crushed his opposition
in the triple jump, springing 52'31/".
just three-quarters of an inch short of
the NCAA qualifying standard. This
win, like Davidson's, marked his
season best.
STARMACK, the success story of
the team, has made enormous strides
in the triple jump since he walked on-
to the team three years ago. He beat
his closest competitor in this meet by
two feet.
In the 500, Todd Steverson broke the
Big Ten Indoor and Meet record with
a 1:01.99. He later joined the second
place 1600-meter relay team which
finished in 3:10.9, trimming more
than two seconds off their previous
best time.
Senior Chris Brewster strode to a
first-place victory in the 5,000 with a
record time of 14:10.1 and also
managed to pull a third place finish in
the 1500-meter run. Teammate Rollie
Hudson also went the distance for the
squad in the 1000-meters, taking fifth.
THOMAS Wilcher covered the hur-
dles for the Wolverines, taking second
behind Rod Woodson of Purdue.
Wilcher ran a 7.22, just .04 behind Rod
Woodson of Purdue for his
season best. After placing third in the
NCAA last spring, Wilcher is a major

Big Tens
contender in this event for the shorter
indoor race.
For the women, senior Sue
Schroeder is also a major contender
in the NCAA meet after winning the
three-mile race in 15:43.56.
Schroeder led the distancers who
rmanaged three second-place finishes
in the meet, scoring the majority of
the points for the team.
Adding to her honors, Schroeder ran
the 3000-meters in 9:15.8. good enough

GET THE MOST
OUT OF THE BEST.

Brewster
... 5000-yard stroll
to take second. Cathy Schmidt
likewise earned second in the mile in
4:48.8. She was edged by Illinois'
Kelly McNee who ran 4:48.64.
Continuing in the distances,
Wolverine Kelli Bert took second in
the 1000-meter run with a time ofo
2:51.0.
The injury-ridden squad, running
without the aid of their middle distan-
cers relied heavily on their field even-
ts to pull them through. Sophomore
Debbie Duncan succeeded in this
area, flinging the shot 46'10" to grab
fourth. This toss earned her the
school record.

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