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November 11, 1985 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-11-11

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, November 11, 1985 - Page 3

BUSINESS
,Video yearbook moves forward

By LAURA BISCHOFF
Producing a video yearbook is not
as easy as the final product makes it
look. No one knows this better than
the core of students struggling to get
"Michigan in Motion" off the ground.
Eric Capstick, president of the
video yearbook, and others face a
number of problems. To start: their
camera was stolen, funding for the
1roject is uncertain, and the Internal
Revenue Service has yet to grant
them non-profit status.
LAST YEAR the University's first
video yearbook was financially
backed by Yearlook Enterprises in
South Carolina. The camera work was
done by eight students but marketing,
sales, editing, production, packaging
and distribution was handled by the
cpmpany. This year the students are
king it all on themselves and will
e Yearbook Enterprises as a ser-
vice company only.
+ "If we get our act together this
year, it (the videotape) will turn out to
be a good one," said Yoonsin Park,
last year's vice president.
"Last year we didn't get a lot of
minorities in. This year we want to
change it. I'll be trying to cover a lot
of the minority issues," she said, then
added, "we tend to be forgotten."
CAPTURING the diversity of the
Jniversity is only part of the
challenge. They estimate they will
need to raise $6,717 for a new video
camera, advertising, and marketing
supplies and another $6,487 for a down
payment on the 500 tapes they expect
to sell this year.
Last year Yearbook Enterprises
sold 150 tapes at $39.95 each and lost
about $4,000 on the project, according
to Capstick. The student organizers
elieve they can do better this year
ecause they are starting to work on
the project earlier.
Also, they have 45 people involved

as opposed to eight last year, and they
will be able to cut costs if the IRS
gives them non-profit status.
IF THEY do not find funding for the
project, Yearlook Enterprises is
willing to back them again this year,
Capstick said.
"They are totally willing to back us
because they believe the potential at
Michigan is so tremendous," Capstick
said.
"Sales are going to make or break
us," said Jeff Libman, an LSA senior
who was involved in the video year-
book last year. He said publicity,
marketing and advertising are
crucial to sales.
THE PLAN on showing last year's
tape and footage shot this year in
campus spots each week. Also, they
want to be visible when out shooting
so they want to get "Michigan in
Motion" T-shirts or jackets, Capstick
said.
Howard Goldman, a new recruit
who is working on the business end of
the project, said he feels the video
yearbook is starting to get the much
needed campus recognition.
Last month the group was turned
down by Michigan Student Assembly
for an $840 grant for a new video cam-
era but they will ask MSA for money
to pay for the promotional staff
jackets, Capstick said.
UNTIL funding comes through from
somewhere, Capstick said some
students have chipped in for a camera
to use in the meantime.
Capstick and Libman are in-
vestigating "all possible funding
sources" before considering cor-
porate sponsorship again this year,
they said.
Capstick is asking fraternities,
sororities, Hillel and the Board of
Student Publications for financial
backing. He has also shown the 1985
tape to the orientation office, ad-

missions office, the athletic depar-
tment and other University ad-
ministration offices in case they want
to use the tape for promotional pur-
poses.
IF THE administration is interested
in using the tape, editorial control
will be maintained by the students,
Park said.
"The administration will have to
take it as it is," she said. "It is student
run and we have the power over it.
I'm not about to give that up for it to
be used for orientation."
Captstick said there is a possibility
that they may branch out and tailor
special promotional tapes for specific
University offices in exchange for
funding.
THERE IS a long way to go before
anyone will see the yearbook tape for
entertainment, promotional, or any
other purposes. Putting the tape
together takes a fair amount of time
and effort, according to Park, who
worked about ten hours each week
last year.
They need to assign people to shoot
events and lifestyle footage on a daily
basis in order to cover everything
from campus parties to sports.
The footage then has to be logged
and Capstick and Park will edit the
tapes weekly so they don't have
thousands of hours of tape to go
through in May, Park said.
CAPSTICK said they already have
footage of the Today show, George
Bush, women's volleyball, CIA
protests, and more.
Unlike a printed yearbook, the
video yearbook needs a video cassette
recorder for the consumer to use it, but
Capstick and Libman - neither of
whom have a VCR - don't see this as
a problem.
"The word is that by the end of the
year VCR penetration will be 25 per-
cent. They're getting cheaper or you
can rent them," Capstick said.

Career Planning &
Placement
Recruiting Schedule
The following employers and
representatives from graduate!
professional schools will be on
campus to conduct interviews.
The following is the schedule
for the next three weeks.
Current week - recruiters on
campus from:
November 11
W.H. Brady Co.
Inmont
November 12
Amoco Information Services Dept.
Amway
Marion Laboratories
Procter & Gamble - Customer
Service
United Telephone Co. of Ohio
W.H. Brady Co.
November 13
Chemical Abstract Service
National "Write Your
Congressman"
Palmer College of Chiropractic
Medicine
U.S. Air Force
Wang Laboratories
November 14
Blue Cross/Blue Shield of
Michigan
Mead Johnson
National "Write Your
Congressman"
University of Texas
U.S. Navy - Officer
November 15
Blue Cross/Blue Shield of
Michigan
Next week - open sign-ups still
available for:
November 18
Equitable Life Assurance Society
Mutual of Omaha
U.S. Navy - Tech. programs & Of-
ficers
November 19
American Graduate School of In-
ternational Management

Data General Corporation
Harvard University Graduate
School of Design
November 20
Charleston, South Carolina School
System
U.S. Dept. of Labor/Bureau of
Labor Statistics
November 21
University of Iowa School of Law
November 22
First Investors Corp.
PASS
IT
AROUND!
Share the
news,
~ ai~j

Requests currently being taken
for interviews with:
November 26
Stuart James, Inc.
Contact the Career Planning &
Placement Office for more in-
formation.
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*H1APPENINGS
Highlight
Dr. Jonas Salk will be on campus today to commemorate his develop-
ment of the polio vaccine 30 years ago. The anniversary celebration will
be held at Rackham Auditorium, where the announcement of the suc-
cessful tests of his vaccine was made in 1955. The events, sponsored by
the School of Public Health, include a public reception from 3 to 3:45 p.m.
and a 4 p.m. lecture by Salk.
Films
Michigan Theater Foundation - Fast Times at Ridgemont High, 7 & 9
p.m., Michigan Theater.
Performances
Major Events - Simple Minds, 7:30 p.m., Hill Auditorium.
Music - Recital, piano students, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Speakers
Biology and Career Planning - Lectures, alumni panelists, "Career
Pathways in the Biological Sciences," 4-6 p.m., MLB 4.
Black Business Students Assn. - Kris Burks, Interfirst Dallas, "Com-
mercial Banking Career," 4-5:30 p.m., Wolverine Rm.
Business Administration - Harry A. Caunter, "Management
Development," 4:15 p.m., Wolverine Rm., Hutchins.
Chemistry - George Christou, "Manganese and Vanadium Thiolate
Chemistry," 4 p.m., 1200 Chemistry Bldg.
Computing Center - Bob Blue, "Working with Magnetic Tapes," 7-9
p.m., 1013 NUBS.
Engineering - F. Ulaby, "Radar Image Texture," noon, 4073 East
Engineering.
Faculty Women's Club - Lunch and listen, Guy R. Mermier, "Aspect
of Women in the Middle Ages," 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Michigan Rm., League.
Germanic Languages and Literature - Nigel Reeves, "Kleist's Debt to
Medicine and Abnormal Psychology," 8p.m., West Conf. Rm., Rackham.
Guild House Reading Series - David James, Duncan Moran, 8 p.m.,
802 Monroe.
Hillel - Rabbi Lawrence Kushner, "A Mystical Table," 7:30 p.m., 1429
7Hill St.
Marketing Club - General FoodstRepresentatives, "Marketing
Careers," 4-5:30 p.m., Hale Aud.
Near Eastern and North African Studies - Brown bag lecture,
Elizabeth Higashi, "Islamic Art: Search for a Visual Language," noon,
Lane Hall Conference Rm.
Near Eastern and North African Studies - David Freedman, "Biblical
Hebrew Poetry," 4 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Strategic Planning Club - Jim Cosens, General Motors, "Strategic
Planning," 4-5:30 p.m., Michigan Room.
Studies in Religion - Harvey Cox, "Jesus and the Moral Life," 8-10
p.m., MLB 3.
William W. Cook Lecture on American Institutions - Making Gover-
nment Work Better, Alice M. Rivlin, "Diagnoses and Prescriptions," 4
p.m., 100 Hutchins Hall.
Meetings
ARK -7:30 p.m., 637 S. Main.
International Appropriate Technology Assn. - 6:30 p.m., 4202 Union.
MS Significant Others Counseling Group - 7 p.m., 2301 Platt Road.
Society for Creative Anachronism - 7 p.m., East Quad.
Miscellaneous
Canterbury House - Open class on developing intuition, 8 p.m., 218 N.
Division.

Report cites progress
in teacher salaries
WASHINGTON (AP) - The nation
is making "slow, but steady
progress" recruiting more and better
teachers as salary increases are out-
stripping inflation, the Carnegie
Foundation reported yesterday.
Ernest Boyer, president of the
foundation, said its new review of
school statistics from each state
provides "grounds for cautious
hope."
But he added, "The challenge con-
fronting teaching in this country is far
greater than its achievements." He
urged immediate action to tighten
professional standards, boost
teachers' pay further and recruit
stand-out students for the profession.
Boyer released an update of a
report called, "The Condition of
Teaching: A State by State Analysis,"
first issued in August 1983.
Its author, C. Emily Feistritzer,
director of the National Center for
Education Information, said the latest
data on teacher salaries, test scores
and other topics "dramatically
demonstrates that all the brouhaha
over teaching is paying off in slow, but
steady, progress."
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