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October 29, 1985 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-29

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Page 6 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, October 29, 1985
Shapfro names panel
for guideline review

6

Search begins for VP

(Continued from Page 1)
Wilson said that 'familiarity or lack
offamiliarity with the guidelines was
nfr a criterion in the selection
process."
#"I'M NOT surprised they haven't
read the guidelines," she continued.
"Our faculty don't generally pore
oarer regental guidelines."
«he added that this lack of
tbckground will help committee
0 embers take a fresh approach to
evaluating the guidelines.
FVaw student Sean Laane, who was
nominated for the committee by the
Michigan Student Assembly, said he
is. "at the moment not in favor of
nmaking any dramatic changes in the
rules."
1'Research that destroys or injures
human life in inconsistent with the
gals of an educational institution,"
Laane said.
HE ALSO opposed any restrictions
on the publication of research results,
which is prohibited by the current
paicy.
Laane interpreted this appointment
as a "positive sign that the ad-
ministration isn't dismissing student
input."
The other student appointed to the
committee, engineering graduate
student Thomas Battle, sasid "it is
horrible to do research that could go
to killing someone.
BATTLE SAID he will try to balan-
ce his views that research should be
openly published with his realization
that national security may prevent
this in some instances.
Human Genetics Prof. James Neal,
who will also serve on the committee,
called classified research "the
toughest issue faculty and students
will have to face in the next decade."
Endorsing defense department
research poses a "crisis of con-
sciousness" for professors, Neel said,
because such research often "leads to
the maiming and killing of people."

History Prof. David Hollinger said
he "hasn't even closely inspected the
text of the current policy," and thus
has not formed an opinion about
whether they need to be changed.
Other members of the committee
include Physics Prof. Arthur Rich,
Electrical Engineering Prof. Arch
Naylor, Pharmacy Prof. Gordon
Amidon, Residential College Prof.
Carl Cohen, Law School Prof. Rebec-
ca Eisenberg, Pathology Prof. Rees
Midgley, and James Lesch, director
of research, development and ad-
ministration.
Eisenberg and Rich both refused to
comment yesterday on the review
process.
Cruise s
(Continued from Page 1)
The terrorists then transferred the
entire group to the largest lounge at the
request of the ship's captain.
Throughout the next 12 hours of tense
waiting, the terrorists waved their
guns and shouted at the hostages. The
gunmen allowed the women to use one
bathroom but forced the some 350
men to urinate on two blankets spread
on a stage in the lounge.
At about midnight, the Arabic-
speaking gunmen began to sort out
the passengers by nationality.
"Passports, they wanted to see our
passports," recalls Mrs. Kubacki.
The 12 Americans - eight men and
four women - and six English dan-
cers were ordered to move to another
part of the lounge, where the
terrorists guarded them closely.
"THEY SAID things like 'Reagan
no good, see? Arafat good, see
Kubacki says.
Early the next morning, the
Palestinians marched the Americans
and English women to a steel deck
accessible only by climbing a ladder
and jumping down onto it.
It was a climb one paralyzed
passenger from New York, Leon
Klinghoffer, couldn't make. The
terrorists told his 59-year-old wife to

(Continued from Page 1)
to find a new vice president before
Frye leaves at the end of the
academic year. "I know that the
president is very anxious not to have
an interim situation," he said,
referring to the possibility that Frye
could leave before a new vice
president for academic affairs is
chosen.
Green said the committee has not
received its formal charge and will
not know how it will go about finding a
successor until after tomorrow's
meeting.
OTHER MEMBERS of the commit-
tee contacted yesterday said they
could not comment extensively on the
search because they did not know how
it will be carried out.
Besides Green, five other faculty
members were appointed to the
committee. They are Thomas Adam-
son, professor of aerospace

engineering and chairman of the
Department of Aerospace
Engineering; Lee Bollinger, a law
professor; William Dawson, the
director of the Museum of Zoology;
Ilene Forsyth, the Arthur Thurnau
Professor of History of Art; and
James Jackson, an associate
professor of psychology.
Michigan Student Assembly
President Paul Josephson, the only
student on the committee, said he
would recommend a candidate "who
is partial to students" and has a
'strong record of allowing student
participation and meeting student
concerns."
Josephson said that because the
vice president for academic affairs
has a great impact on tuition and
academics, he should be especially
sensitive to student concerns.
LSA Dean Peter Steiner is also a
member of the committee.

0

Green
... awaits formal charge

Shapiro
... hopes for quick solution

hip hos tago
stop pushing his wheelchair toward
the ladder.
"(THE terrorists) said that they
would take care of Mr. Klinghoffer,"
Kubacki remembers. "After 10
minutes I heard two shots and a
double splash on the starboard side of
the ship.
"In my heart, I knew that they had
shot Mr. Klinghoffer," Kubacki con-
tinues.
Despite media reports to the con-
trary, Kubacki insists that Klinghof-
fer was killed because he posed an ob-
stacle to the terrorists and because he
was an American - not because he was
a Jew. Although the Kubackis were
the only Christians among the
American passengers, the couple says
all the Americans' names were on the
terrorists' list of people to be shot.
After the hijackers herded the
American hostages to the playrooms,
they and the ship's captain told Mrs.
Klinghoffer that her husband had suf-
fered a heart attack and was under
the care of the ship's doctor.
But Kubacki says he appraoched
the distraught woman and relayed his
suspicion that her husband had been
murdered.
"I SAID that 'I'm saying this
because I fear we are all in mortal

remembers 3-day captivity

danger.' My wife said 'Don't say that
to Mrs. Klinghoffer,' so I said 'I'm
sorry but I fear for our lives.' "
Around midnight, the hostages were
moved back to the lounge where the
other passengers and the crew had
been kept. The gunmen suddenly an-
nounced the hostages would be
released at 6:30 a.m. the next day. But
they didn't end their reign of terror.
Instead, they handed grenades with
pulled pins to the four American
women and told them to sit on a stage
facing the 400 others. "The first one to
faint or collapse would not only blow
themselves up, but everybody else
too," Kubacki remembers.
FORTY-FIVE minutes later, the
Palestinians whom the Kubackis
describe as the good terrorist called
off the "charade."
That "good terrorist" was the only
gunman who allowed the women to
use the bathrooms. But he was also
the one who "put the bullet through
Klinghoffer's forehead," Kubacki
says a bartender, who had witnessed
the execution later told him.
Throughout the three-day ordeal,
neither the hostages nor the terrorists
ate or slept.
"ALL (THE terrorists) did was
smoke, drink Coca-Cola and tea,"

v .i6 v

Kubacki says. "And I learned later
that at least one of them injected
something in his arm to keep awake."
THE HOSTAGES were not released
the next morning as promised. Ten-
sion built among the hostages and
terrorists as the deadline came and
went.
"They were terrible hours, we
didn't know if (the terrorists) would
be frustrated and shoot us anyway,"
recalls Kubacki.
"I was so proud of my wife, she was
terrific in those horrifying circum-
stances," he continues. "There were
moments when we thought it was
(over) now. But no one cried, no one
wept ... I was very proud of my fellow
Americans."
ELEVEN HOURS later, the
terrorists were led away, and the
hostages were allowed to return to
their cabins to rest. No one slept,
however.
The next day officials from the U.S.
Department of State and Egyptian
authorities interviewed the hostages.
The hostages were taken to Cairo,
and hustled into a hotel with strict
orders to be discreet.
"WE WERE told to pack our bags,
and they would be picked up one at a
time, so as not to attract any atten-

tion. At 7:00 we were supposed to
meet at the lobby and be rushed to the
airport ... I think we were an em-
barrassment to the Egyptian gover-
nment and at the time there was
rioting on the streets of Cairo," says
Kubacki, who watched the events on
the television in his hotel room.
The U.S. intercepted the Egyptian
airplane carrying the terrorists that
day.
"I personally thought 'God, that'
wonderful,' " Kubacki says. "I found
out later there was a feeling of
euphoria in the U.S. I agree with
that."
Kubacki, along with Mrs. Klinghof-
fer, made the positive identification of
the terrorists in police line-ups later
that day when the group was flown to
Cyprus.
The hostages were then flown to
Weisbaden, West Germany, and then
to Newark, New Jersey. Despite their
ride in a military cargo plane that
lacked the rudiment of comfort like
seats and noise control, Kubacki and
his wife say they were "treated like
first-class passengers."
"Some of the simplest things in life
were so great, like a good cup of cof-
fee," Kubacki recalls, lighting
another cigarette.

II.

71 4-5'iF 7I

0

i

LOST & FOUND

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

PERSONAL

HELP WANTED

LOST MONDAY! Tri-colored, 14K gold bracelet.
REWARD $30.00. Call 763-2733. 25A1101
LOST: Black wallet with no money, in Union
area. 668-0966. 24A1101
LOST CRYSTAL Necklace on Hill Street Friday
night (10/18). Reward! Sentimental value.
Michelle 764-3879. 11A1029

1980 CHEVETTE - Good condition. Call
995-1576 PERSISTENTLY. 38B1104
'71 PONTIAC Ventura. 77,000 original miles,
new brakes, exhaust, tires. $600.00 or best.
(Day) 665-7282, (Evening) 434-0077. 37B1101
OPEN SUNDAY, 1-5, 16 Harvard Place.
Arboretum/Campus area, redecorated beautiful
3 bedroom, 2 baths, fireplace, rec. room, etc.
in natural setting on wooded rolling lot. $147,500.
Riggs and Company, 1-697-0987. 40B1104
BIKE - Raleigh Sprite - 21". Terrific condition.
$95. Call 995-0439. 02B1030
'80 DATSUN 210-Red, new tires. Runs like a
dream. $2000 or best offer. 769-6462. 27B1101
FENDER STRATOCASTER STD. Fantastic,
1 years old, made in USA. $380 or best offer by
Nov. 1. 881-3330. 22B1030
GREAT BOOKS For Sale - Classic Titles, make
a deal. 994-6476. 09B1031

8-PIECE SILVERWARE SETTING, $15. 8-Place
china setting, $25. 4-piece knife set including steak
knives, $15. Assorted pots and pans, $15. Upright
vacuum cleaner, $15. Floor length drapes: 3-sets
of two panels, beige with white backing, to fit
sliding glass doors, $20 per set. Four tires: two
E70-14 Grand Am Super Wides G/T, and two
H70-14 Grand Prix Super Wides G/T, raised white
lettering, 3,000 miles, $150. 6-foot couch with
slipcovers, $30. Or best offer on any combination.
Call 764-2397 afternoons or 995-0649 evenings.
20B 1031
TICKET TO THE BODY BLAST JAM. Call
764-6905 for details. 08B1107
1980 MAZDA RX-7. 5-speed, great condition.
$5250. Call 665-7391. 14B1107

FOR SALE

1977 CAPRI - Black, very clean, six speakers
stereo/cassette. Very reliable. $1250 or offer.
971-2785 evenings. 33B1101
IS IT TRUE You Can Buy Jeeps for $44 through
the U.S. Government? Get the facts today! Call
1-312-742-1142 Ext. 1137-A. 50B1112

FOR RENT

DAILY CROSSWORD PUZZLE
Edited by Trude Michel Jaffe

ACROSS
1 "- I say..."
5 Numeral
10 Particular
14 Whether-
15 Horace's
muse
16 Title for
Margot Fonteyn
17 Before dinner "
reading
18 Poison
19 Touched down
20 Accomplishing
nothing
23 Argyles
24 Antique car
25 Teeter
28 "if I - King"
30 DA's work
space
33 Staggering
34 One of Woody's
children
35 Queens
playpen
36 Accomplishes
nothing
39 Babysit
40 Facial feature
41 City on the
Rhone
42 Part of the UK
43 Make an
impression
44 Go gliding
45 Ring wins
46 Malaysian craft
47 Accomplishing
nothing
54 Ye - Gift
Shoppe
55 Lorna
56 Type style,
for short

2 Neighbor of
Wash.
3 William's aunt
4 Site of Notre
Dame
5 Coin
6 A Forsyte
7 Crowd
8 Pour-
(intensify)
9 Hit song from
"Annie"
10 Baking potato
11 Narrative
12 Dubai
millionaire
13 Parcel out
21 Turnpike takes
22 Teeny
25 Extravagance
26 "...words of
tongue - "
27 Creature
28 Snatch
29 Otherwise
30 Claw
31 Sublease
32 Colette's cup
34 Prolific
author, for
short

35 Author a
soap opera
37 Biased
38 Devastation
43 Saluki
44 Stay
45 Prepare to be
knighted
46 Feather or wing

47 Strapless, for
one
48 Mishmash
49 Unused
50 After otto
51 Chesterfield
52 Town near
Windsor Castle
53 Light beige
57 "-
Sylphides"

WINTER TERM SUBLET - one room in a
5-room house. Nice, cozy room, kitchen,
washer/dryer, parking. Women only. $212/month
and utilities. Call Susie 996-0951. 31C1101
THOMPSON APARTMENTS
350 Thompson Street efficiency now available.
Completely furnished in modern building on
corner of Thompson & E. William. For more
information call 483-7232. 32C1111
MUST SUBLET - Albert Terrace Apt.
2 Bedroom, Starting mid-December. Call Warren
at 996-1759. 35C1104
SINGLE ROOM available immediately in North
Campus co-op. $285/Mo. includes food, laundry,
utilities, many extras. Karen 663-9283. 99C1105
FURNISHED EFFICIENCY available
immediately. Convenient campus location. $306
a month, heat included. 663-3504 evenings.
13C1108
WINTER TERM SUBLET - 3 single bedrooms
in a 6 bedroom house. Large rooms, kitchen,
den, washer/dryer, parking. Great housemates
and location. 1 minute to Union, $190/month
+ utilities. Call now - Sheryl, Gail, or Jordan
761-2868. 03C1030
1 BEDROOM AVAILABLE, Winter Term.
$158.50/month, utilities included (except electric).
Deposit (refundable), $385.50. Lease length,
Jan. 1-May 1. No pets. Located near Briarwood
on bus line. Call Bob, 971-9563 after11:00 p.m.
06C1030

TRANSFER your prescription to the VILLAGE
APOTHECARY, 1112 S. University. cFct
ELLEN - Happy (late) 19th Birthday! Hope
you had a maaar-velous one, dahling. Love,
M and E NCF1031
STUDENTS! You're invited to Nicaragua! We
heard you tell NBC to cover the war in El
Salvador! Congratulations on a successful demo!
Write the NICA School, P.O. Box 1409,
Cambridge, MA 02238, (617) 497-7142 for
information about Spanish language courses,
family living, and community work in Esteli,
Nicaragua. With voices like yours - together
we can end U.S. intervention in Central America!
26F1101
MALE BOY GEORGE FAN would like to form
support group for men interested in dressing with
complete freedom. Discreet individuals reply to
JIM, P. O. Box 732, Plymouth, MI 48170. 91F1104
A CUT ABOVE HAIR DESIGN - Special $5 off
any service, first visit only. Call 662-2544 for
appointment. cFtc
CONFIDENTIAL
INEXPENSIVE
GYNECOLOGICAL CARE
Planned Parenthood
3100 Professional Dr., Ann Arbor
(near Washtenaw & Huron Pkwy.)
973-0710 cFtc
STUDENT SERVICES
TUTORING by Grad student. All subjects incl.
composition. 1-968-0976eve. 36G1112
RESUMES - written - also word processed or
typeset; coverletters, too. 662-4530. .cGtc
ANSWERING SERVICE. Computerized, 24 hours,
only $7.50 permonth! 451-7121. 97G1029
ACE Word processing, student discount.
769-9069. 21G1120
ACCURACY INK
Editing/Word Processing
Reasonable Rates. 971-4139.
cGtc
ESEARCH PAPERS
14,278 to choose from-all subjects
Order Catalog Today with Visa/MC or COD
101 800-351-0222
in Calif. (213) 477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 to. Research Assistance
11322 Idaho Ave. #206-SS, Los Angeles CA 90025
Custom research also available-all levels

WANTED: MODEL for glamour art photography
for possible commercial reproduction. Also
make-up artist. Call for an interview 769-5745.
28H1101
TELEPHONE & COUNTER HELP. Lunch
hour Monday thru Friday, & Sunday 4:30 p.m. -
9 p.m. Apply in person Omega Pizza near U
of M Hospital. 57H1029
SINGING MESSENGERS for balloon delivery.
Flexible hours, must have car. Call 995-1972,
between 10 and 5. 96H1105
DISPATCHER-DRIVER. Evening food delivery
service. Use company vehicles. Make up to
$8.00/hour. Call 665-4122. 95H1101
DEVELOPING THAT
RESUME?
The Michigan Daily is seeking responsible,
qualified students for positions in advertising
management.
The Michigan Daily is one of the few student-
run publications in the nation and can offer
you a hands-on experience; unlike other
"gopher" internships.
Managers are needed in co-op advertising and
finance, serving a 12-month term of office be-
ginning January 1986. Experience is helpful,
but a genuine interest in learning and an
attitude of professionalism will suffice. Each
position requires a weekly commitment of 25
hours.
Apply now at 420 Maynard, Student Publica-
tions Bldg. Call Dawn Willacker at 764-0554 for
more details.
Use Daily Classifieds

BUSINESS SERVICES
EDITOR - 40 years experience in making good
writing better. Best quality, low rates, fast
service. 995-0772. cJ1211
TYPING - ALL KINDS - Fast, efficient service.
Reasonable rates. Laurie, 973-1592. cJtc
A-1 TYPING - On Campus. Professional Rush
Service Available. 668-8898. cJ1211
Papers/Resumes/Coverletters
EXECU-TOPS Word Processing 663-7158
cJtc
TYPING - All types. Fast guaranteed work
@ reasonable rates. 668-6109. 85J1113
THE NEW SCHOOL OF PIANO
First lesson complimentary. 994-0371
SANDI'S TYPING & WORD PROCESSING
***20% Off 1st paper (with this ad)***
Fast & accurate. Papers, briefs, resumes, letters,
theses. Campus pick-up & delivery. 426-5217.
cJtc
REALM'S
LSAT COURSE
November 12 - December 5
Reasonable Rates.
665-3579 70J1109
ACCUTYPE
WORD PROCESSING
Resumes, Papers, Cover LettersEtc.
Complete Secretarial Service
Available Same Day Service
761-5050
cjtc

I,

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
W A SP S K AY S ME E
A LE UT M A CE TO0D D
KE E PA NE YE P EE LE D
E EK R E NO ARENA
SR R R A TE
K EE P SON EE Y EOP E N
A L LA E LL ER E RA
P 0lL U L II S T RA P
O PT P E SOS R I SE
K EE PS T 0TH E RU LE S
A EO0N TEE
STyR UT P A CTEEPA S
K E E P SON E SHOPE U P
E RN E W IS H R E T R
E NT R E TT E T RE A T
10/29185

MUSICAL

DORM DOINGS

SINGLE ROOM available in North Campus
Co-ops. For info. call Philip at 763-3915 or
665-0166. 05D1030

LESSONS - Special Pay for 4, take 5. Best
teachers in state. Expert REPAIRS Herb David
Guitar Studio. 665-8001. cNtc
PASS
IT
AROUJND I

t 2 3 4
14
17 -
20t

TICKETS

6 7Z8Z

15

z1 4

18 19
22
24
28 29
34 35
37 1 ---T E
3R

11 12 3

GREEK GAB

HELP WANTED

O HOW I HATE OHIO STATE - BUT I NEED
4 OHIO STATE VS. MICHIGAN FOOTBALL
TICKETS. PLEASE CALL (after 7:00)764-7074.
23Q1101
NEEDED - Indiana OSU tickets. Parents
desperate. Top dollar. 761-7358. 04Q1030
NEED DESPERATELY - Four Ohio State
tickets, not necessarily together. Top dollar paid.
Mark, 764-2030 after 6 p.m. 84Q1104
DESPERATELY WANTED. OSU/Michigan
football tickets. 973-9582. cQtc
A.BSOLUTE top dollar paid for UM football tick-
ets. Call 973-6327. cQtc
NEED FOOTBALL tickets to Nov. 23 OHIO
STATE game. Call 1-513-381-2337 collect or write:
Scott Ashburn, 359 Oregon, Cincinnati, Ohio
45202 GO BLUE!! 19Q1030
AVAILABLE: 2 tickets to the Ohio State game.
665-8934. 12Q1031
UM/OSU tickets needed for large company. Will
- . . A11... At'1 i{I lAn 'L7QO, stl~fll

JACKSON SHIELDS HURFORD III - Here's
to Dire Straits, cheap Champagne, Perky Panda,
Shish Kabobs, misplaced cars, and dessert. Love,
Jeannette NCE 1029
PHI BETA SIGMA FRATERNITY Incorporated
Brotherhood, Scholarship, Service, Since 1914.
Be strong Crescents, the road is long, but the
destination great. Your Dean NCE1029
ALPHA GAMMA DELTA Sorority will be

EARN MONEY on all the magazines sold on
campus. Need people to post information. Good
profit, Write BPC, 8218 Hardy, Overland Park, KS
66204 39H1030
PART-TIME maintenance man needed at AGD
sorority. Call Mrs. Eaton at 662-2176. 34H1030
OFFICE WORKER. Part time, flexible hours.
Apply at 338 S.,State Street. 01H1030

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