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October 28, 1985 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-28

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, October 28, 1985 -Page 3

BUSINESS

Laywer addresses wage disparity

By NANCY BRAIMAN
An activist concerned with pay
equity said Friday night that the
culprit of wage disparity is the em-
ployer who segregates employees into
jobs for men, jobs for women and jobs
for minorities.

"This segregated work force is the
key to wage disparity," said Winn
Newman, a Washington attorney, who
addressed a crowd of about 40 people
in Hale Auditorium.
Newman's speech was part of a
symposium on comparable worth
sponsored by the Women's Law

U.S may bqgn

export of crude
WASHINGTON (AP) - Japan is the export li
expected to be one of the buyers when process inc
the United States becomes an oil ex- publishinga
porter, probably early next year, a regulations
Commerce Department spokesman ment period
said yesterday. Cooper sa
President Reagan is expected to license appli
seek the department's approval to ex- filed yet, bu
port Alaskan crude oil from the Cook parently bee
Inlet area, said spokesman B. Jay wants to sell
Cooper. Word of t
The amount involved would be only Alaska Gov
about 6,000 barrels a day, Cooper said. briefly with.
Such sales would generate ap- Yasuhiro Na
poximately $61 million in annual The Japa
revenues. chorage onF
It will take about 75 days to obtain home from N

oil

Student Association.
The principle of comparable worth
asserts that employees should receive
equal pay for work of comparable
value.
Newman said the electrical in-
dustry is one of the biggest per-
petrators of sex-based wage
discrimination. He said that women
on the assembly line are paid less
than men who work as janitors and.
groundskeepers.
"We need compliance from the
public and private employers," said
Newman about Title VII of the Pay
Equity Act.
"Sex- and race-based wage
discrimination is prohibited by the
pay equity act, but the difficulty is in
proving it," said Newman.
According to Newman, one must
examine company documents and
show that the wage disparity could not
have occurred by chance.
Newman said that most cases of
wage disparity occur with jobs that
require no prior experience and only a
high-school diploma in many instan-
ces.
Newman said that critics of com-

""""'

'4' , .' "
Daily Photo by SCOTT LITUCHY
Winn Newman, attorney specializing in labor issues and pay equity, gives the keynote address on race and
sex-based wage discrimination at a comparable worth symposium Friday night at Hale auditorium.

icense, Cooper said. The
ludes printing a notice,
amendments to existing
and a 30-day public com-
. -
id he did not believe the
ication had been formally
ut "the decision has ap-
en made that the president
Cook Inlet oil."
he export plan came from
. Bill Sheffield, who met
Japanese Prime Minister
akasone last week.
nese leader was in An-
Friday for a stop en route
New York.

parable worth feel that the gover-
nment is setting wage rates and that
interferes with the free market
system and it is not economically and
adminstratively feasible.
In a panel discussion Saturday,
Gerald Skoning, a lawyer from
Chicago, said "the litagation will con-
tinue to strike horror and terror in the
hearts of employers because they are
class action suits and it draws
tremendous media attention as it con-
tinues.'

Skoning wants to continue to
politicize the issue and dredge out the
statistical data for open inspection by
the public.
"Congressional reaction to
Supreme Court decisions in com-
parable worth can be swift and com-
prehensive," said Skoning.
The symposium covered state and
local developments, Title VII
litigation, economic and ad-
ministrative issues, and comparable
worth and race.

w. U p e q w4PtM

Ann Arbor named as
'business hot spot'

WASHINGTON (AP) - Ann Arbor; with good
Massachusetts and Connecticut; and for intern
cities and states in the industrial nor- Connec
th are among the 10 hottest places in stands for
the United States to start new INDIAT
businesses, trend-watcher and author public-pri
John Naisbitt said Friday. Massac
Naisbitt, author of the book following
"Megatrends," released his list of the revival,
10 best places for starting businesses dustrial e
and creating jobs in what he calls the Mesa, A
"new information, electronic, service and beco
economy." retailing
THESE 10 PLACES are very MINN]
nourishing to entrepreneurs," said High m
Naisbitt. cooperati
"The entrepreneur is emerging as business
the new hero in this economy," he ad- trepreneu
ded. San Ar
The cities and states named by business.
Naisbitt were listed in alphabetical like a glot
order, with no attempt to rank among San Di
the top 10. The list, and some of the strong g
reasons he pointed to for each: panies.
ANN ARBOR: In the shadow of TAMP
Detroit, it is becoming a center for bean ar
development and use of robotics. developr
' Atlanta: Becoming "a global city"
rHAPPEN

air connections and a center
ational trade.
ticut: "Connecticut really
small business."
NAPOLIS: "Tremendous
ivate cooperation."
husetts: The whole state is
Boston in a new-business
moving "from the old in-
conomy" to high technology.
Ariz.: "Great quality of life"
ming a center for tourism,
and technology.
EAPOLIS-SAINT PAUL:
arks for public-private
on and for big technology
es that encourage en-
urship from within.
,ntonio, Texas: "Very pro-
...It's thinking very much
bal city."
ego: High quality of life and
growth of high-tech com-
A, FLA.: Port to the Carib-
nd major research and
ent center.
INGSi

Career Planning &
Placement
Recruiting Schedule
The foliowing employers and
representatives from
graduate/professional schools
will be on campus to conduct in-
terviews. The following is the
schedule for the next three
weeks.
October 28
Comspec
George Washington University
National Law Center
October 29
Amoco Chemicals Corp.
Carstab
Mobay
Procter & Gamble (Sales)
October 30
Amoco Chemicals Corp.
Information Systems Corp.
K-Mart Corporation
Vista Chemical Co.
University of Southern California/
Annenburg School of Com-
munication
U.S. Navy (Officer)
October 31
Bamberger's
Dow Corning
K-Mart Apparel
November 1
Dow Corning
Naval Surface Weapons Center
William M. Mercer-Meidinger,
Inc.
November 4
Bell Labs
Equitable Financial Services

November 5
GTE
IBM
Lawerence Livermore National
Lab.
Naval Weapons Center
Sanders Associates
November 6
Cooley Law School
IBM
Mutual of Omaha
Rand
Ralm Corporation
The Institute for Paralegal
Training
Stepan
November 8
Bell Northern Research
Upjohn Company
November 11
W.H. Brady Co.
Inmont
November 12
Amoco Information Services Dept.
Amway
Marion Laboratories
Procter & Gamble (Customer Ser-
vice) i
United Telephone Co. of Ohio
W.H. Brady Co.
November 13
Chemical Abstracts Service
U.S. Air Force
VAN DYCK DOBOS
STUDIOS
663-6966
* Passport-Immigration
" Resume-Application
" Portraits
"Reasonable Rates"
407 E. WILLIAM
c. Division - Ann Arbor
"Good service,
good coverage,
good price-
T hat'sState Farm
insurance."
DAN
JILEK
450 S. Main
Suite 3
Ann Arbor
761-2666
STATE FARM Likeagoodneighbor,
State Farm is there.
®'® State Farm
Insurance Companies
INSURANCE Homne Of Illinois

November 14
Blue Cross/Blue Shield of
Michigan
Mead Johnson
Contact the Career Planning
& Placement Office for more
information.
"Because you never
get a second chance ...
to make a
first impression.
CAREER
DIMENSIONS
COMPLETE RESUME SERVICE
M.A. CAREER COUNSELING
JANET B. ROBINSON
761-2458
321 South Main
Suite 210

a n dy~vnns
" Ho estu
by arts.8 ~12
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203 E. Hoover
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Permanent Centers In More Than
120 Major U. S. Cites & Abroad
For Information About Other Centers
OUTSIDE N.Y. STATE CALL TOLL FREE 800-223-1782
In New York State Stanley H Kaplan Educational Center Ltd

HARVEST OF VALUES

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COPY
OVERNIGHT
minimum of 10 copies per original

Highlight
The LSA student government is having a mass meeting for all students
interested in running in the LSA-SG elections at 7:30 p.m. in the Welker
room of the Union.
Films
Bullard Films Series - A Matter of Struggle, 7 p.m., East Quad
Auditorium.
MTF - Under the Volcano; 7 & 9 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Performances
School of Music - Recital, piano, students, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Speakers
Russian & East European Studies - Elizabeth Wilson, "Making a Dic-
tionary with the Russians," 4 p.m., E. Conference room, Rackham.
Studies in Religion - Harvey Cox, "Jesus & the Moral Life," 8 p.m.,
MLB 3.
Near Eastern & North African Studies - Geo Simmons, "Recent
Changes in Population Policy in Egypt," noon, Lane Hall Commons
room.
American Friends Service Committee - Susan Cary, "The Death
Penalty: Its Impact On Prisoners & Their Families," 7:30 p.m., 1420 Hill
St.
Chemistry - Ted Brown, "Reactions of Photochemically Generated
Metal Carbonyl Radicals," 4p.m., Rm. 1200, Chemistry building.
Meetings
Society for Creative Anachronism -7 p.m., East Quad.
Michigan Society of Medical Research -1:30 p.m., Union.
Miscellaneous
Yearbook sittings - Walk-in sittings, 9 a.m. to noon, 1 to 6 p.m., 420
Maynard St.
CEW - Discussion, How to do an On-Line Library search, noon to 1:30
p.m., 350 S. Thayer St.
Guild House Campus Ministry - Readings, Robert Bixby & Mary
Phillip-Petrick, 8 p.m., 802 Monroe St.
Macromolecular Research Center - Colloquium, Yotaro Morishima,
"Phntnrdny Chemistrv in the Functinnalized Polvelectrolvte System." 4

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764-9216

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iA ll
t:r

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It's not hard to get daring
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.1

-People

it's Ter-r-rific!"
l 1.2L a

" tie I I ml pilt 11

-- ----, -

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