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October 25, 1985 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-25
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Demand,
not salary,
rises for
educators.

* SR:. ns~nnag i s M
college graduates specializing in a
variety of subjects, she said.
Recruiting the new faculty members
wasn't a problem she said, but added,
"I'm sure we'll feel the pressure soon.
We have potentially 100 teachers who
could retire this year."
Harold Fowler, assistant director of
the University's Office of Career
Planning and Placement, noted that
virtually all students who earn

teaching certificates will find jobs
when they graduate, although they
may have to relocate. School systems
in Houston, Dallas, California, and
Virginia, are aggressively recruiting
on campus, he added.
Students with certificates to teach
math, science, and special education
will receive the most job offers, ac-
cording to Fowler. "We do get some
(offers) for social studies and English
too," he added.

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A national study conducted by
Education Week earlier this year
shows that there is a considerable
shortage of teachers of math, physics,
chemistry, and computer program-
ming. The study found a slight shor-
tage of bilingual education, special
education, and biological sciences
teachers.
Despite the shortage, few college
students are considering teaching as
a career option these days. Last year,
for example, only 274 University
students were certified by the School
of Education, compared to 1,480 in
1970. The majority are certified in the
social sciences and English, although
the percentage of music or math
majors has risen five percent over 10
years.
Low salaries are the biggest reason
students are saying no to education,
according to Murphy.
"Unfortunately, (teaching) is not a
well-respected field," she added. "In
Europe, a great deal more prestige is
associated with the teaching
profession than in the United States.
It's very difficult to support a family
on a teaching salary."
The Michigan Federation of
Teachers wants to improve the
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teaching profession's image by
raising salaries, according to Rollie
Hopgood, an administrative assistant
to the union. The federation does not
advocate a lowering of teaching cer-
tification requirements, she said.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics,
however, predicts that teachers'
salaries will not increase even with a
shortage of- educators.
According to Education Week, the
national average salary for elemen-
tary and secondary school teachers
with bachelor's degrees is $15,400. The
average salary for those with
master's degrees is only slightly
higher at $17,410.
Salary offers to teachers in
Michigan are below , the national
average at $14,500, according to Marti
Reesman, who handles recruiting for
the ed school. City school systems
such as Detroit offer as much as
$21,000 starting pay. Reesman said
that teachers who further their own
education can earn as much as $30,000
10 years after they are hired.
Many students enrolled in the
School of Education say that they
made their career choice out of a
desire to work with children rather
than for financial gain.
Nancy Smolinski, a senior in the
school, has decided not to pursue
more profitable offers for her
background in math and science
"because I've always wanted to
teach."
Because of a 40 percent budget cut
dealt the education school a year ago,
the University isn't actively
recruiting students for its teaching
courses.
But undergraduates can be cer-
tified without enrolling in the school.
To be eligible for certification, they
must have junior standing, a
minimum 2.3 grade point average,
two recommendations, and write an
essay on their committment to
education as a career. Application
materials should be submitted in
March to the education school, which
oversees certification in all units on
campus.

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