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October 25, 1985 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-25
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.. ,. Yi.

r By Stephen Gregory
0F ALL THE aspects of job hun-
Jting, nothing may be as agonizing
as those half-hour interviews with
prospective employers who try to ex-
pose your personality while you at-
tempt to deftly size up their com-
panies.
With a bit of research and
familiarity with the format of an in-
terview, however, that agony can be
overcome.
"The objective of the interview is to
convince the interviewer you will fit
in perfectly with the company and the
job you're applying for," says
Margaret Carroll, director of
placement at the University's School
of Business Administration.
Earl Pfeiffer, a recruiter for IBM,
says "two things that the interviewer
considers as given are that the inter-
viewee will know himself well and will
know a good deal about the company
and the job he's going after."
The only way to show a recruiter
that you know yourself is to carefully
analyze your career goals in relation

Research and rehearsal
Keys to interviewing success

to your previous job experiences and,
skill strengths and weaknesses -
before the interview.
"Researching a company is almost
like adding another class to your
schedule," says Donna Gray, an ad-
ministrative assistant in Career
Planning and Placement.
_ Being able to ask intelligent
questions about a company's projects
or plans for the future can make or
break an interview, Carroll em-
phasizes. "If only two out of 13 inter-
viewees know a lot about a company,
then that's a strong indication of
who's interested in the company," she
says.
"A good place to start researching
is by looking at Dunn and Bradstreet's

Million Dollar Register or the Stan-
dard and Poor's Register of Cor-
porations," says Jane Lucas, a
librarian at the business school.
Both directories briefly describe
major corporations by their size,
location, top managers, and main
products or services. Lucas also
suggested reading annual reports and
recruiting brochures provided by the
company as well as recent periodicals
that feature articles about the firm.
These materials are available in the
business school library and the career
planning and placement office.
"On the day before the interview,"
Carroll says, "go over in your mind
the points that you want to get across
to the interviewer that make you best

for the job."
Since first impressions count, you
should also be sure of your recruiter's
name and address him or her for-
mally when the interview begins. Use
"Mr.," "Mrs.," or "Miss," and offer
your hand first in the handshake.
''As important as anything else is
how well you can communicate," says
Roy Mastic, a manager at Dow
Chemical who has recruited at the
University.
He and other recruiters say they
usually pose questions such as these:
" Tell me about yourself and why
you decided to interview with us?
" Why do you think you'll be suc-
cessful in this field?
" Where do you see yourself in 10
years?
* Tell me about your previous jobs
and what you learned about your field

of interest from them.
" Why did you choose your major?
"If I ask questions and the inter-
viewee does not respond thoroughly, I
consider that a poor interview,"
Mastic says.
During the last half of the interview
the recruiter usually turns the
questioning over to the student. This
opportunity allows the interviewee to
further convey interest in the com-
pany. Specific questions concerning
salary or offers to show the recruiter
unrequested work samples should be
avoided in the initial interview,
however, Carroll says.
According to Donna Gray, non-
verbal communication is just as im-
portant during an interview as what
you say.
"Posture, eye contact, and bearing
can either contradict or underline
what you're trying to get across to the
interviewer," Gray says.
Non-verbal communication is par-
ticularly important at the end of an in-
terview, adds Allan Troub, a recuiter
for Data Graphic Inc.
"Plan your exit, don't let your
professional presence down," Troub
said. "Be pleasant and enthusiastic,
but above all be yourself."

By Nancy Driscoll

A FTER 16 YEARS of note-taking
and homework, the last thing
most college students probably con-
sider after graduation is a teaching.
career.
Yet jobs for educators are opening
up across the country, owing to a new
surge in the number of school-aged
children combined with a drop in the
number of college students receiv-
ing teaching certificates.

Trying to match the influx of
children of the Baby Boom
Generation, school districts are
desperate for elementary educators,
according to Luda Murphy, an

economist with the U.S. Department
of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics.
The demand for educators has
grown so great in some parts of the
nation that colleges are lowering
requirements for teaching cer-
tificates.
And some school districts such as
Houston and Los Angeles are feeling
the pinch so much that they are
willing to hire teachers who haven't yet

been certified. The L.A. school
system recently posted adver-
tisements saying: "Want to teach but
have no credentials? Relax. We can
help. You get your teaching creden-
tials while you work full-time as a
junior or senior high school teacher."
Michigan hasn't taken such drastic
steps yet, although the shortage of
teachers in the state may worsen.
Nearly 17 percent of the 87,471

Back to the classroom]?
Demand for teachers increases

edi
bee
this
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be
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Lib. arts grads sell skills

(Continued from PageO
a recruiter for Bantam Publishing Co.
in New York. She says that although
English, communication, and jour-
nalism majors tend to dominate the
publishing field, her firm also hires
business and other liberal arts
majors.
Graduates of a liberal arts
curriculum gain valuable "tran-
sferrable skills," such as writing ef-
fectively and analyzing data that will
help them in any job, Taylor says.
"Written and verbal com-
munication, no matter what type of
occupation, is critical for success,"
she adds.
"It's that total combination of ex-
periences and the way the student is
able to articulate what they have got-
ten out of those experiences (that
matters)."
Almost every employer relies as
much on the general impression an
applicant makes as on his
qualifications on paper. Jeff Mar-
shall, personnel director at First of
America in Ann Arbor, says the
resume "is least important, as long as
it's halfway well done."

ogervicei
D

"We tend to look toward the
business degrees," Marshall says, but
he adds, "We've had people in the
bank who have liberal arts
backgrounds, and they've done very
well. It depends on the area."

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PROGRAM IN AMERICAN 11
LECTU RE/ DISCUSSION
FALL 1985
October 17 Corporate Careers: Pros and Cons of V
in Big Business.
Jack Rowan, Director of Quest Services, Co
data Worldtech, Inc.
23 Address by A. Alfred Taubman, Progi
Institutions Benefactor, (3-4 p.m.)
29 Working in Washington: Public vs. Pri
John Katosh, Executive Director of Researc
Analysis, Election Date Services.
November 1 The Pleasure and Perils of Dual Caree
Relationships. A panel discussion with:
Ann and Tim Connor, social worker and artis
Cindy Straub and John Heidke, University of
Annette and George Robson, Burroughs exe
Moderated by Rosemary Sarri, Professor of
University of Michigan
(12-2 p.m.)
5 Jobmanship: You've Got the Job. Now
Jim Berline, President, The Berline Group.
12 Power! And Other Timely Topics for
Women in Management.
A panel discussion with:
Leslie Christensen, Director of Operations, E
Prudence Cole, Account Manager EDS,
Karen Teegarden, Vice President, Laine Mey
(4-6 p.m.)
19 Got the Message?: The Importance of
Business Communications.
Alan Kidd, Senior Vice-President, Quality As
Sandy Corporation.
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