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October 24, 1985 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-24

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, October 24, 1985
Inquiring
Photographer
By John Munson

6

"Do you feel the University is justified in putting a hold
credit on students who have not been vaccinated?"

Michael Mitchell,
Engineering senior: Some
measure should be taken,
but this is too extreme. It's
no different from having to
get shots in grade school.
The ideal is good but the
method is a bit extreme.

Natalie Engler, LSA fresh- Lynn Webley, LSA senior: John Herlocker, LSA Debby Freedman, Residen-
man: Yes, but this punish- No. They should not be able sophomore: After last year, tial College Senior: It's a
ment is too severe. They to do anything to the studen- yes. I don't know if they can serious problem, but they
should charge a fine at ts. It's a personal thing. justify holding credit, but should take other actions fir-
registration. they can justify some type of st.
restriction.

Robert Wright, School of Ar- Dave Kramer, School of Ar- A. Hamilton, LSA graduate Patty Leher, LSA freshman: Tim Anderson, class of 1983:
chitecture junior: No. In- chitecture junior: I would student: I think it's good. It's Yes. If people aren't vac- I don't think so. I could see it
stead they make them pay say so. They should be vac- for the protection of others. cinated, they might get if it were a problem, but I
more, or make them be vac- cinated. But not -letting them everyone else sick. don't see it as a problem.
cinated at registration. register is going too far.
Demonstrators file misconduct complaints
(Continued from Page 1)

IN BRIEF
COMPILED FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS AND
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS
GOP may ban Jordanian arms
WASHINGTON - Senate lepublican leades, in a stinging setback for the
Reagan adninstration, roved yesterday to block the president's unpopular $1.9
billion Jordanian ams sale until March 1, unless Jordan and Israel begin peace
talks in the interim.
Sen. Sclhard Iugar Ind.) chaimnan of the Senate Fbreign I elations Corrnittee,
said he expected Democrats would join the move, and predicted the foil Senate
would vote overwhelmingly in favor of the temporary ban as early as today.
Lugar told reporters the legislation would "preserve the option for the president"
of selling ams to Jordan at a later date, as well as "give opponents the assurances
they wanted" that the sale would not go ahead unless Hussein sat down at the
bargaining table for "direct and meaningfulpeace negotiations" with the Israelies.
In addition, he said it was a "step of keeping the peace process going without a
negative vote" that could have been discouraged orembarrassed Hussein, who has
said he is willing to negotiate with Israel.
Chinese nuclear aid to Iran
threatens treaty with U.S.
WASHINGTON - Newly uncovered infomtion that China has recently offered
sensitive nuclear technology to Iran and other nations threatens to derail the U.S.-
China nuclear cooperaton agreement signed in July, congressional experts and
other analysts said yesterday.
They voiced concern that China will help other nations, including Iran, acquire a
nuclear weapons capability in violation of the spirit of the U.SChina nuclear
agreement, which provides the framework for sales of U.S. coiercial nuclear
technology to China.
Sen. Alan Cranston 0)Calif.)went public with charges Monday that China has
aided, or offered aid, to Bazil, Argentina, Pakistan, South Africa and Iran.
"My infonmtion is that China has either engaged in serious nuclear trade
negotiations with or actually has continued a series of nuclear exports to each and
every one of these five 'nuclear outlaw' nations subsequent to Chinese discussions
with the Meagan adinstraton officials on the importance of curbing such
troublesome exports," he said in a statement on the Senate floor.
Warsaw Pact calls for
reductions in nuclear arms
SOMA, lkilgaia - Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev and other Warsaw Pact
leaders concluded a two-day summit conference yesterday and adopted a
document "on the elimination of-nuclear threat" with a call to the West for joint ar-
ms reductions.
The seven-nation communist alliance is "decisively in favor of curbing the arms
race, in favor of the effecting of a positive change in international relations," said
Ivan Ganev, deputyforeign ministerof this host country.,
Soviet foreign nministry spokesman Vladimir Iumeiko denied allegations that
Moscow had violated terms of the 1979 Salt II treaty on limiting some types of
nuclearweapons.
Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger accused the Soviets Tuesday of deploying
new SS-25 intercontinental nuclearmissiles that may be moved around on trcks to
make them difficult to detect.
Lomeiko stopped short of saying no deployments at all had taken place, but
repeatedly stressed "no one missile has been deployed which can disturb Salt II."
Rebels kill Pilippine officical
MANIlA, Philippines - Communist guerrillas shot dead a provinicial governor,
and a student was killed during a battle between government troops and insurgents
in renewed violence yesterday, authorities and news reports said.
Esewhere, security forges attacked a crowd of anti-government demonstrators
on Panay Island, injuring 43 people and arresting 13, according to witnesses.
The military sasid two men believed to be reners of a Corinmmnist death squad
shot and killed Gregonio Murillo, governor ofSurigaodel Sur province on Mindanao
Isand, 510 mles southeast of Manila.
Murillo was the highest civilian official to be killed by rebels this year. He had
been goveror formrre than a decade.
Guernillas have killed moe than 70 officials, including about a dozen myors
and several village heas, in previous attacks this year many occurring on Min-
danao.
Col Jesus Herrmsa, the deputy operations commnder based in Davao city, said
Murillo angered insurgents by criticizing them in his broadcast on a local radio
station.
Arab leaders to talk peace
CAIfO, Fypt - President Hasni Mubarak and Jordan's King Hussein will meet
today in Jordan to discuss Middle East peace prspects, goverment soures said
yesterday.
The sourtes, who spoke on condition they not be identified, said the two Arab
leaders would talk about an offer by Israeli Rime Minister Shi=n eres to begin

peace talks with Jordan this year.
The Aman meeting was arranged during a telephone call from Hussein to
Mubarak on Monday, the sources said.
During a speech Monday at the United Nations, Peres offered to go to Jordan to
begin peace talks and also called for an end to the state of war which has existed
between Israel and Jordan since the birth of the Jewish state in 1948.
F.ptian sources said Mubarak will also brief Hussein on recent talks with U.S.
Deputy Secretary of State John Whitehead.
The U.S. envoy was in Cairo this week to repair diplomatic damage caused by the
U.S. decision to intercept and force to Italy an Egyptian plane carrying the four
hijackers of the Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro.

"

6
6

Hughes had no comment on the in-
cident, and Klinge, who is in-
vestigating the complaint filed by
Kritt and Savoie, could not be reached
last night for comment.
"I told (Klinge) that I thought the
officer acted in violation of my
freedom of speech and assembly and
the captain explained that the Univer-
sity has the right to control the at-
mosphere at a ticketed event," Savoie
said.
BOB PIFER of campus security
said his department does not permit
signs which block the view of other
people or cameras at University even-

ts.
In another complaint related to the
Today show, former student David
Wolf alleged that a student director of
the marching band grabbed a trumpet
he had been playing near the end of
the broadcast.
"I guess he was afraid that we
would play while the marching band
was playing," Wolf said. "We were
only supposed to disrupt what (host
Bryant) Gumbel was saying, so I
don't know why he was so worried."
THE STUDENT director, Bryan El-
Zoghby, said he grabbed the horn

because he thought it would be picked
up by the network's audio equipment
during the marching band's perfor-
mance. "For national TV we just
wanted to give the best performan-
ce," he said. "We worked really hard
for this, and we didn't want it to be
ruined."
El-Zoghby said he had asked Wolf to
stop playing, "but the protester con-
tinued to play. "So I reached out and
grabbed the trumpet. I didn't hit him.
I just held on until the song was over."
Ann Arbor Police Det. Nick
Schubring, who is handling the com-
plaint, would say only that the case is

"still under investigation."
At the protest during Bush's speech
commemorating the 25th anniversary
of the Peace Corps, a group of
protesters said they were pushed and
verbally harassed by students in the
section reserved for invited guests.
Representatives of the College
Republicans and the Delta Kappa Ep-
silon fraternity, whose members were
among the invited guests, said they
were aware of the incidents but were
not responsible for them.
No formal action was taken after
the Bush speech.

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of
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Located at 207 South Ashley
662-8310

Featuring:
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us Monday-Friday, 5 P.M.- 8 P.M. for
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ALSO
Wed.-Friday & Football Saturdays
Live Music 5:30 P.M. - 7:30 P.M.

UAW, Chrysler
reach 3-yr. pact
(Continued from Page 1)

I

local union leaders meets today in
Detroit to review the tentative con-
tract and recommend it for rank-and-
file ratification this weekend. UAW
President Owen Bieber said he expec-
ted the agreement to pass, with
workers returning on morning shifts
Monday.
CHRYSLER WORKERS would get
an average wage increase of 2.25 per-
cent in base wages in the first year of
the contract and an average lump-
sum payment of 2.25 percent in the
second year. In the third year, they
would get an average 3 percent wage
increase. A cost of living formula is
retained.
"When I tell you we have a full pat-
tern here at Chrysler, we mean the

total package, including job security,
outsourcing, training, pensions and
the other pieces of that auto package
pattern. In short, we feel we've met
all our goals," Bieber said.
Bieber and union vice president
Marc Stepp said the tentative con-
tract meets the "full auto pattern"
established at General Motors Corp.
and Ford Motor Co. last year.
THIS IS full parity and pattern
plus," to contracts with GM and Ford,
the union said.
Miner said Chrysler didn't gain the
reductions in job classifications that it
had sought but would pursue the issue
in local negotiations. The company, in
the pursuit of higher productivity, had
wanted about 500 job classes reduced
to six to eight.
"We would have liked to have seen a
lot more in the agreement... that
would improve productivity," Miner
said. However, he said, it contained
some language that was "a good
start" toward such improvements.
INDUSTRY ANALYSTS said the
pact generally would allow Chrysler
to stay competitive with General
Motors Corp. and Ford Motor Co. but
may do little, if anything, to allow
Chrysler to make inroads against the
labor-cost advantages of the
Japanese.
Separate strikes here and in
Canada, which began Oct. 16, will
have cost the No. 3 automaker more
than $100 million in lost profits by the
end of the week. A new contract for
10,000 Canadian workers was ratified
Monday and they returned to work.

PIZZA Only $4.00 fora
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761-1111
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0 bt it~tgan 19a- IV
Vol XCVI - No.36
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the Fall and Winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April - $18.00 in Ann Arbor; $35.00 outside the city. One term -
$10.00 in town; $20.00 out of town.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and Sub-
scribes to United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles
Times Syndicate, and College Press Service.

10

ISRAEL INFORMATION
Thursday, October 24, 10:00 - 5:00p.m.
Think-inn 7 ni a k e ..vi-r.n- r--1 - -- ir inrr i .

Editor in Chief..................NEIL CHASE
Opinion Page Editors........JODY BECKER
JOSEPH KRAUS
Managing Editors.......GEORGEA KOVANIS
JACKIE YOUNG
News Editor............. THOMAS MILLER
Features Editor .......... LAURIE DELATER
City Editor............. ANDREW ERIKSEN
Personnel Editor.........TRACEY MILLER
NEWS STAFF: Eve Becker, Melissa Birks, Laura
Bischoff, Rebecca Blumenstein, Joanne Cannella,
Philip Chidel, Dov Cohen, Kysa Connett, Tim
Daly, Nancy Driscoll, Rob Earle, Rachel Gottlieb,
Stephen Gregory, Linda Holler, Mary Chris
.Jaklevic., Vibeke Laroi, Jerry Markon, Eric Mat-
tson, Amy Mindedl, Kery Murakami, Jill
Oserowsky, Christy Riedel, Michael Sherman
Jennifer Smith, Jeff Widman, Cheryl Wistom.
Associate Opinion Page Editor .. KAREN KLEIN
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Jonathan Corn, Gayle
Kirshenbaum, David Lewis, Henry Park, Peter
Mooney, Susanne Skuhik. Walter White.

PHOTO STAFF: Jae Kim, Scott Lituchy, John
Munson, Matt Petrie, Dean Randazzo, Andi
Schreiber, Darrian Smith.
Sports Editor..............TOM KEANEY
Associate Sports Editors ......... JOE EWING
BARB McQUADE, ADAM MARTIN,
PHIL NUSSEL, STEVE WISE
SPORTS STAFF: Dave Aretha, Mark Borowsky,
Debbie de Frances, Liam Flaherty, Steve Green-
baum, Rachel Goldman, Jon Hartmann, Darren
Jasey, Phil Johnson, Rick Kaplan, Christian Mar-
tin, Scott Miller, Greg Molzon, Brad Morgan,
Jerry Muth, Adam Ochlis, Chris Parker, Mike
Redstone, Duane Roose, Jeff Rush, Scott Shaffer,
Pete Steinert.
Business Manager......DAWN WILLACKER
Sales Manager.........MARY ANN HOGAN
Assistant Sales Manager ........... YUNA LEE
Marketing Manager........CYNTHIA NIXON
Finance Manager...........DAVID JELINEK
DISPLAY SALES: Sheryl Biesman, Diane Bloom,
Gavla Brockman. Debbie Feit. Jennifer Hevman.

I

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