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October 22, 1985 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-22

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Cl bic

Mitt tgan
Ninety-six years of editorial freedom

1Eatl

Vol. XCVI - No. 34

Copyright 1985, The Michigan Daily

Ann Arbor, Michigan - Tuesday, October 22, 1985

Eight Pages

Court
reinstates
S
South End'
editor
By JILL OSEROWSKY
The controversial editor of Wayne
State University's student newspaper
was returned to her position at The
South End yesterday.
Patricia Maceroni's temporary
reinstatement as editor came
following a U.S. District Court
decision invalidating the WSU Student
Newspaper Publications Board's Oct.
3 meeting during which Maceroni was
fired. She was charged with "in-
subordination" for refusing to rescind
a ban on military advertisements.
JUDGE HORACE Gilmore ruled
that the meeting violated the
Michigan Open Meetings Act because
the session was closed to the public.
But there is no telling how long
Maceroni's reinstatement will last.
"I'm ecstatic even if it's only for a
day or two or three," Maceroni said.
The board has been given two weeks
to hold another disciplinary hearing
during which it may vote to
dismiss Maceroni. If the board fires
her again, the case will return to the
federal court in Detroit where it is
now pending.
"WE WILL definitely go back to
court if they fire me again," Maceroni
said.
"I expect they will schedule another
meeting," said John Minock,
Maceroni's attorney. But he added
that the judgement could come out
differently if the case goes to court a
second time. "I can't predict if the

hotel

rej eels
plan,

rule ie

By AMY MINDELL
Plans for a hotel and conference
center in downtown Ann Arbor were
shot down last night when members of
City Council voted 7-4 not to change a
building ordinance.
The ordinance revision would have
cleared the way for the project by
allowing its developers to subtract
underground parking space from the
total amount of usuable floor space.
As the ordinance now stands, the
project's size exceeded that allowed
by law.
THE COUNCIL then voted down the
actual plans for the conference center
because it would be approving an
illegal site plan.
The proposed center would have
covered the entire block bounded by
Huron, Ashley, Washington, and First
Streets. It would have been built
around a Michigan National Bank,
which is currently located at the site.
The conference center was to in-
clude a 400-room hotel, a retail area,
an interior arcade and atrium, and
parking for 389 cars, 25 percent of
which would be underground. It was
to be 13 stories high and to include a
penthouse.
A PROPOSAL for a center on this
site has been known since 1981.

Doris Preston (D-Fifth Ward) said
the majority of the council voted
against the ordinance - in effect the
conference center - for several
reasons.
"I've received over 50 phone calls
and letters about the project, we must
be. responsive to the community ...
and consider the increased traffic
flow in the area, increased develop-
ment in the city, (among other
things)," she said.
OTHER DEMOCRATS on the coun-
cil expressed reluctance to accept the
parking ordinance as an answer to the
problems the city has with parking.
"We must discuss, and re-examine
downtown parking, adn the city's
needs . . . this is not an appropriate
approach," said Councilmember
Lowell Peterson (D-Fifth Ward).
A report by traffic and transpor-
tation engineers issued last May said
that the traffic added by the proposed
center can be accommodated by the
existing street system, without a
significant decrease in the level of
service.
COUNCIL member Larry Hahn
(Fourth Ward) was the only
Republican to vote against the
See CITY, Page 3

A student is about to disappear from view beneath one of fall's thinning trees yesterday on Hill Street. The photo
was taken from East Quad.

See COURT, Page 6
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Protest awaits CIA recruiters

U' to
appoint
research
review
panel

By JERRY MARKON
The University will within the next
week announce the members of an ad-
hoc committee to review guidelines
for classified research, according to
Vice President for Research Linda
Wilson.
Wilson yesterday told the Research
Policies Committee at its monthly
meeting that the review committee -
to be composed of six to eight faculty
members, two students, and two ad-
ministrators - will work to remedy
specific problems outlined by the
University's Board of Regents.
THE REGENTS ordered a review
of the guidelines because of former
Vice President for Research Alfred
Sussman's rejection of a proposal for
arms control research submitted by
political science Prof. Raymond Tan-
ter.

Sussman said Tanter's project
violated University guidelines which
prohibit limiting the publication of
results. But several regents com-
plained that these guidelines could
inhibit any professor from conducting
research.
Yesterday, Wilson presented a
summary of regental concerns and
said they would form the basis of the
review committee's charge.
WILSON SAID the major problems
to be addressed by the committee in-
clude concerns that the present
guidelines, approved in 1972, are too
ambiguous and restrictive.
Regents have said they are
representing the anti-military mood
of the Vietnam War era.
The committee was originally sup-
See 'U', Page 6

P'; KERY MURAKAMI
Central Intelligence Agency recruiters, almost a year
after being chased out of theMLB by protesters, are.
coming back to campus.
Recruiters will interview about 18 University students
today and tomorrow for jobs with the agency, said Ane
Richter, assistant director of the University's Office of
Career Planning Placement (CC&P)
AND STUDENTS are expected to protest again. "It's
hard to say what we're going to do because we don't know
what the CIA is going to do," said Mark Weinstein, an LSA
junior and a member of the Latin American Solidarity
Committee.
He said that demonstrators will gather in front of the
Student Activities Building at 8 a.m. and then rally on the
Diag at noon.
But spokespeople for CP&P and the CIA downplayed the
anticipated protests. Deborah Orr May, director of career
planning and placement said the office was not taking any
special precautions to guard against demonstrations.

"The students have a right to express their opinions,"
May said. But she added that the office's job is to make
sure -that-studentswho ,want interviews get them without
distractions. Students interviewed are nervous enough
without the protesters, she said.
KATHY PHERSON, a spokesperson for the CIA said
yesterday, "We recruit at a couple of hundred campuses
every year. Protests are just something that happen
every once in a while. It's not something we're too concer-
ned about."
Last November, students disrupted a presentation by
the recruiters, chasing them out of the Modern Languages
Building and into their cars. Interviews the next day were
cancelled, though students met with recruiters a month
later undisturbed.
CIA recruiters held interviews in January with no
major distractions. Security guards restricted the
protesters to the main CP&P office, away from rooms in
the back where the interviews were held.
See CIA, Page 6

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'U'

donor was

By MELISSA BIRKS
One of the University's most
prominent donors is both the ri hest
man in Michigan and a college
A. Alfred Taubman - whose name
and more than $5 million is attached
to the University's medical library,
the new health care center, and the
Program in American Institutions -
left the School of Architecture in 1948
after only two years of study.
HE ENROLLED in the Lawrence
Institute of Technology in Southfield
* Profile
but dropped out a year later at the age
of 25 to set up his own contracting
company with a $5,000 loan.
Now a real estate magnate at age
60, Taubman is enjoying the benefits
of his business acumen. His portfolio
includes: 630 A&W Restaurants, 17
Woodward and Lothrop department

stores, numerous shopping malls in
the Metropolitan Detroit area in-
cluding Briarwood, a majority in-
terest in the Oakland Raiders, and
Sotheby's - the elegant art auction
house headquartered in London.
The Oct. 28 issue of Forbes valued
Taubman's current holdings at $600
million, making him the 64th richest
person in the United States and the
wealthiest in Michigan.
AND TAUBMAN ranks among the
top contributors to the University,
although the Bloomfield Hills-based
businessman asks that the exact sum
of his donations not be revealed.
"You don't get buildings named af-
ter you for just a $1,000 donation,"
says Jon Cosovich, vice president for
development and University
relations.
In 1981 Taubman donated $2 million
to the University to set up American
Institutions, a supplemental program
for undergraduates that combines
curriculum from the economic,
social, and political disciplines with
summer internships and on-going

'ollege d
workshops with distinguished
business and community leaders.
THE REPLACEMENT Hospital
Project received a startup contrib-
ution of $3 million from Taubman as
well, according to Linda Ayers, direc-
tor of public relations for the project.
Cosovich would not disclose how
much money Taubman gave the
University for the medical library,
but he did say the discreet
multimillionaire now heads the
capital fund-raising campaign com-
mittee for the Replacement Hospital
Project. It is speculated that it was
largely Taubman's personal contacts
that convinced General Motors to
donate $1 million to the project and
the Ford Motor Company, $2 million.
Taubman has gained a reputation
as a calculating businessman who
stays abreast ofhis many and varied
operations.
ALSO FIERCELY guarded about
his private life, Taubman refuses to
discuss publicly what he'll do with his
fortune or the money he sunk into the

ropout
now-defunct Michigan Panthers foot-
ball team. He also avoids the media,
granting interviews only on topics he
deems important - such as
education, art, and medicine.
And though Taubman has spoken at
the dedication of campus buildings
bearing his name, few University em-
ployees who work in those offices can
boast of ever meeting the man who
essentially created their jobs.
"I haven't even met the guy who
has been paying my check all these
years," says Kathleen Kurtz, manager of
the American Institutions program.
BUT PEOPLE who have come into
contact with the tall, stocky, white-
haired man say he drops his en-
trepeneurial shrewdness outside the
office. His autumn Saturdays, for
exampleare often spent watching
football games in Michigan Stadium.
He has season tickets.
"He's congenial, well-informed,
hard-working, and enthusiastic," said
Cosovich, who has met with Taubman
about fund-raising efforts for the new
See 'U', Page 2

'U' dropout A. Alfred Taubman has donated over $5 million to the University.

TODAY-
Bug Out

dejected Koch said Friday. "I came to get him this
morning and he was ... gone." But Koch managed to
get a replacement, and Periplaneta Plunder II proved
it was no crawl-by-night substitute. Plunder II won its
heat but the final victory was not to be, as Plunder II
lost by an antenna to a competitor named Roach over

Reagan? They're all on the "Top 100 Irish Americans"
list appearing in the premier issue of the magazine
Irish America. Cuomo, Mailer and Jackson are three
of 10 "Honorary Irish Americans" in the list. Cuomo
has shown a rare understanding of the Irish and other
ethnic groups, Mailer has had a preoccupation with

-INSIDE-
INTELLIGENCE: Opinion looks at the activities
of the Central Intelligence Agency. Page 4.

I

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