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October 11, 1985 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-11

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the Michigan Dily-- Friday, October 11, 1985 - Page 3

HAPPENINGS
Friday
Highlight
f
The Ecology Center of Ann Arbor is sponsoring a bucket drive on the f
1streets of Ann Arbor to raise funds for the Center. The bucket drive is a b
part of the Ecology Week activities.
in
Films q
C2 - Duck You Sucker, 7 p.m.; The Good, the Bad & the Ugly, 9:30 m
p.m., MLB 3. l
Alt. Act. - Broadway Danny Rose, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., MLB 4. j
MTF - Prizzi's Honor, 7 & 9:30 p.m., Michigan Theater. s
AAFC - Mask, 7 & 9 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud. r
Japanese Film Series - Demon Pond, 8 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Near Eastern & North African Studies - The Opium & the Baton, 8 d
p.m., Angell Aud. B. t
Nurse-Midwifery Serice - Midwife: With Women & Daughters of m
Time, 7 p.m., Meeting Room, Ann Arbor Public Library.
(
Performances S
t
Theatre Dept. - Project Theatre, The Daughter-In-Law, 8 p.m., Men- o
delssohn Theatre. h
Performance Network - Loot, 8p.m., 408 W. Washington St. q
School of Music - Concert Band; Larry Rachleff, conductor, 8 p.m.,
Hill Auditorium.
Eclipse Jazz - Ebenezer Obey and the Informers Band, 8 p.m., Power n
Center. C
Speakers t
Guild House - Otto Maduro, "Latin American Liberation Theology: 0
Contemporary Perspectives," noon, 802 Monroe St. a
South & Southeast Asian Studies - Edilberto C de Jesus, "History in
the Marcos 'New Society'," noon, Lane Hall Commons Room.
Anthropology - James Holston, "The Valley of the Dawn Being an Ac- s
count of Amillenarian & Curing Cult Amongst the Popular Classes of the a
City of Brasilia," 4p.m., Rm. 2021 LSA. P
s
Meetings I
s
Chinese Students Christian Fellowship - 7:30 p.m., Packard Road b
Baptist Church.
Juggling Club - 3 to 5:30 p.m., diag.
Miscellaneous
International Folk Dance Club - Lessone, 8:30 p.m., 1208 S. University
St.
Korean Christian Fellowship - Bible study, 9 p.m., Campus Chapel.
Microcomputer Education Center - Workshops Education Center -
Workshops: dBase I1, 1 to 5 p.m., Macintosh as a UMnet Terminal, Part
II, 3 to 5 p.m., Rm. 3001, School of Education Building.
CEW - Academic Women's Caucus, Betty Blythe, "Academic Men-
toring: the Need, Barrjers & Facilitators," noon, Coamerica Bank
building on N. University.
Reading & Learning Skills - 3-session mini-course, Geraldine Markel,
Enhancing Presentation Skills Using Effective Study Strategies, noon,
1610 Washtenaw Ave.
Ecology Center - Computers and Informational Democracy with
Mark Vermillion, 12:15 p.m., Ann Arbor Public Library.
Canterbury House - Fireside discussion with two Ann Arborites recen-
tly returned from Managua, Nicaragua; 218 N. Division St.
Saturday
Highlight
The Coca Cola Bottlers of Detroit and WAAM radio is sponsoring the
Instant Photo Corporation of America IdentiChild program from noon to
4 p.m. at Arborland Consumer Mall. Parents can have their children
photographed and fingerprinted for free. The growing awareness of the
plight of missing children has inspired community businesses to sponsor
the event.
p Films
Alt. Act. - Breakfast at Tiffany's, 7:30 p.m.; In Cold Blood, 9:30 p.m.,
Nat. Sci. Aud.
MTF - Racing With the Moon, 7 p.m.; Falcon & the Snowman, 9:15
p.m.; Michigan Theater.
CG - The Breakfast Club- 7, 8:45& 10:30 p.m., MLB 3.
C2 - Painters Painting, 7 p.m.; French Can-Can, 9:10 p.m., Angell
Aud. A.
MED - An Officer and a Gentleman, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m., MLB 4.
Performances
Theater Dept. - Project Theatre, The Daughter-In-Law, 8 p.m., Men-
delssohn Theatre.
Major Events - The Nylons, 8p.m., Power Center.
University Musical Society - Hanover Band of London, 8 p.m., Hill
Auditorium.
Performance Network - Loot, 8 p.m., 408 W. Washington St.

Meetings
Ann Arbor Go Club - 2 to 7 p.m., 1433 Mason Hall.
Miscellaneous
Matthaei Botanical Gardens - Exhibit, 1 to 4 p.m.; demonstration,
Ikebana, 1 p.m., 222 State Plaza.
College of Engineering -- Tech Day, tours of engineering laboratories
and facilities, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Chrysler Center.
Highlight Sunday

College
By BUD ROSENFIELD
This year's college sourcebooks,
usually the bane of admissions of-
icials, should have University of-
icials and alumni boasting and
bragging more than ever before.
Those handy sourcebooks aimed at
nfluencing the dwindling pool of
qualified high school students have
much praise for the University and
ittle criticism. From the purely sub-
ective guidebook to the more
ystematic ones, the University is
eceiving high marks.
THE UNIVERSITY'S un-
dergraduate schools draw consisten-
ly rave reviews. Cass and Bir-
mbaum's Competitive Guide to
American Colleges, 11th edition
$12.95) coins the phrase "Mother of
State Universities" when referring to
he University. They also call it "one
of the very few giant universities that
has achieved both quantity and
quality education."
Education editor of the New York
Times, Edward Fiske, wrote in his
new guide The 100 Best Buys in
College Education ($9.95) that the
University "has always been a big at-
raction because it is consistently
rated with Ivy League schools and
other big name institutions in
academic excellence."
CASS AND Birnbaum's guide,
which includes a specific rating
ystem for assessing a university's
academic standing and selectivity,
laces the University in its "very
elective" category. Factual
background information such as SAT
cores and high school rank form the
basis of this guide's ratings system.
Barron's Profiles of American
Colleges ($12.95) has a similar system
vhich refers to median SAT scores,
nedian ACT scores, high school rank,

sourcel
G.P.A. required for admission, and
percent of students who are accepted.
Placing in the third highest of nine
categories, the University ranks
"Highly Competitve."
For a more subjective rating, there
are a host of reference books, all
giving a peak into the side of college
life not found in slick university
publications.
EDWARD FISKE'S The Selective
Guide to Colleges ($9.95) bases his
reviews on a university's "reputation
in the academic world," quality of its
faculty, level of its teaching and
research, quality of its libraries, and
the "academic seriousness" among
the students and faculty. These aspec-
ts taken together win the University
five stars, the publication's highest
honors.
Another more subjective view of
colleges, the Insider's Guide to the
Colleges, ($9.95) was compiled by the
staff of the Yale Daily News. This
book states that the University's
engineering and pre-med students
receive "an education that can be
equalled by only a few other univer-
sities."
The same publication also com-
mends the Honors Program here for
its "excellence, personalized instruc-
tion" and "good counseling." This
and other sourcebooks mention the
Pilot Program, the Residential
College, The American Institutions
Internship, and the Hopwood Creative
Writing Program as additional
highlights of the University's overall
programs.
The University's graduate and
professional schools are perhaps even
more highly rated than its un-
dergraduate programs.
Goldfarb's Inside the Law Schools
says of the University's law school:

)ooks praise
"No one can dispute the fact that the lines for financial aid
faculty, student body and academic cafeteria as the bigge
programs put the U of M in the top Most critics believ
five." the benefits gained f
But there were some notable sity's immensity - th
criticisms of this large institution. and selection of coui
Many guidebooks noted that the diversity of the stud
hugeness of the University creates the ability to choose f
what some people term as "imper- on-campus activities
sonal" atmosphere. Others cite the compensates for the d

'U,
, CRISP, and the
st annoyances.
e however, that
rom the Univer-
he large number
rses offered, the
dent population,
rom a variety of
- more than
disadvantages.

4 /2>

h~
b.

GRAND OPENING
Fuji Restaurant
P s~mnr i'~ldaai

L

An invitation to enjoy exquisite Japanese
cuisine in our lovely oriental setting
at 327 Braun Ct. (across from Farmer's Market)
Ann Arbor * (313) 663-3111
Lunches from $3.95, Dinners from $7.50
CLOSED SUNDAY - Major Credit Cards Accepted
Catering * Private Party Room 0 Box Lunches

._

PRE-LA
DAY
VISIT WITH ADMISSIONS OFFICERS
AND DEANS FROM OVER 80 U.S.
LAW SCHOOLS. INFORMATION ON
ADMISSIONS, PRE-LAW COURSES,
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES AND MORE.

,.-
D
._.
_""
L
1
f.
,j J l

FORD FOUNDATION DOCTORAL
FELLOWSHIPS FOR MINORITIES
Applications now available
in 160 Rackham
Deadline Nov. 15, 1985

MONDAY, OCT. 14
10A.M. to2 P.M.
Mich. League Ballroom

:

PRE-PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
A UNIT OF STUDENT SERVICES

j
I

s

B

N

I

0

R

S

Your time is almost up.
If you still haven't had your senior picture taken,
you face the possibility of not appearing with the
rest of your class in your edition of U-M's year-
book, the 1986 Michigan Ensian. There is no
charge and no further obligation. Simply stop in
the Ensian office weekdays 9-noon or 1-6. No ap-
pointment is necessary.
Yearbook Special.
Order your 1986 yearbook at the sale price of
$23 and get the 1983, '84 and '85 Ensians - the
yearbooks of your freshman, sophomore and jun-

The School of Music is sponsoring a Faculty Voice Recital with conduc-
tor Gustav Meier at 4 p.m. in the Rackham Lecture Hall.
Films
CG - The 39 Steps, 7p.m.; Spy in Black, 8:30p.m., MLB 4.
C2 - The Witness, 7 p.m.; Montenegro, 9 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
MED - Diner, 7:30 & 9:30p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
MTF - Care Bears Movie, 4,7 & 9 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Performances
Theatre Dept. - Project Theatre, The Daughter-In-Law, 2 p.m., Men-
delssohn Theatre.
Performance Network - Loot, 4 p.m., 408 W. Washington St.
Hill Street Players - SHOW, 2 & 6 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
Meetings
M in motion - the video yearbook - 5 p.m., 1412 Mason Hall.
Miscellaneous
WELS Lutheran Campus Ministry - Sunday school, 9 a.m.; Redeemer
Lutheran Church, 1360 Pauline Blvd.

ior years

- all for an additional $20. That's a

savings of $45. Only 50 available on a first-come,
first-serve basis. Cash only.

I

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