100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 11, 1985 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Star wars on

Campus

See Weekend magazine

j:j; b r

Ai r ian
Ninety-six years of editorialfreedom
Ann Arbor, Michigan - Friday, October 11, 1985

Vol. XCVI - No. 27

Copyright 1985, The Michigan Daily

Twelve Pages
Blackouts
continue

on

campus

B ue set
to battle
for state
supremacy
By BRAD MORGAN
Better than the Showdown in Mot-
own better than the War to Settle the
Score; it's time for the annual cross-
town clash between Michigan and
Michigan State, and this year it
promises to be a doosey.
Michigan State finally found its of-
fense last week against Iowa, so sud-
denly the game is no longer looking
like the blowout some people thought
it was going to be. Bobby McAllister
played well against the Hawkeyes,
and Lorenzo White seems to be
starring in his own movie titled,
Lorenzo: First Down, Part II, so sud-
denly the long time rivalry is heating
up.
AS IF IT needed any extra fuel
thrdwn on the fire. These teams
always go at each other's throats with
gusto, and with Michigan trying to
p avenge last year's crushing 19-7
defeat and the Spartans trying to beat
the Wolverines in back-to-back
seasons for the first time since 1966-
67, the heat is on.
"We're more fired up than we were
last week because it's Michigan and
it's a rivalry," said White. It's the
game everyone is waiting for . .. it's
tradition. When you come in here they
tell you there's a team you want to
beat most and that's Michigan."
If anyone can lead the Spartans past
Michigan, it's White. The scintillating
sophomore out of Fort Lauderdale,
Fla. has become one of the top run-
ning backs in the country, leading the
Spartan ground game with 664 yards
on 137 carries. What's even more im-
pressive is that, before the Iowa
game, White was nearly MSU's lone
See PERFECT, Page 12

By PHILIP CHIDEL
University and Detroit Edison of-
ficials are still searching for a cause
of a series of power outages in the past
month that have left several Univer-
sity streets unlit raising student con-
cern about safety on campus.
Ron Mason, the general supervisor
of customer marketing services at
Detroit Edison, said there have been
problems with damaged underground
cables which supply power to the
campus streetlights.
"WE'VE (DETROIT Edison) had
some problems with cable cutting,"
Mason said. "I don't say that (the
outages) are results of cable cutting
because we won't know until we get
our reports back. But we have had a
quite a rash of it this year."

"To damage a cable, you can nick a
cable ... (up to) four months before. .
. the cable faults," Mason explained.
"The weather has a lot to do with it.
The more rain you get, the more
faults you get. . . from damage that
was done a long time ago."
The outage of lighting in the Diag
last weekend and the ongoing
blackout along South University have
been the most notable of numerous
outages. Others include Thayer Street
(MLB, Hill Auditorium area), Thom-
pson Street (the front of West Quad),
Huron Street (Frieze Building,
Rackham Building area), and, on
North Campus, Beal Avenue
(Engineering Building area)
OFFICIALS said they suspect that
See BLACKOUTS, Page 2

Greek guts
Members of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority struggle for a victory over Kappa Alpha Theta during yesterday's
tug-of-war at Sigma Chi fraternity's Derby Days. The events, which also included ice-cream eating contests
and initiation ceremonies, were organized by Sigma Chi and will help raise money to aid handicapped
children.

'U' STUDENTS PLAN RALL Y ON DIA G

Students across U.S

By KERY MURAKAMI
Chants of "Hey, hey, ho, ho, South African
apartheid has got to go," will be heard on cam-
puses across the nation today as students at
over 100 colleges are expected to participate in
a national day of protest against apartheid.
At -the University, students from the Free
South Africa Coordinating Committee will
simulate a South African funeral march star-
ting on the Diag at 11 a.m.
A RALLY, featuring several speakers in-
cluding State Rep. Perry Bullard (D-Ann Ar-
bor), City Councilman Larry Hunter (D-First
Ward), and Barbara Ransby, leader of the
campus-based anti-apartheid group will take
place on the Diag at noon.
The University's Board of Regents voted last

month to divest $4.5 million of stock in com-
panies that do business in South Africa,
bringing the University's total divestment to
$49.5 million or 90 percent of the $50 million in--
South Africa-related stocks it held in 1983.
Despite the regents action, Ransby urges
students to participate in the rally. "A stand
against apartheid is something that cannot be
compromised. The regents' action, though it's
clearly a step in the right direction, is an at-
tempt to come up with a compromise," Ransby
said.
"EVEN A HALF a million dollars still in-
vested detracts from the symbol of the action,"
she said.
The rally here and at other colleges comes in

Sto protes
response to a call by the New York-based
American Committee on Africa to join in a day
of unity between colleges pushing for divest-
ment. Today is also a Day of Solidarity with
South African Political Prisoners, designated
by the United Nations, said Joshua Nessen,
national student coordinator of the ACA.
Nessen added that the group is calling for a
minute of silence at 1 p.m. (EST) today to
present a united message.
RANSBY SAID the rally would end with the
silence, before moving to the Michigan Union
for a series of workshops and discussions about
apartheid at 3 p.m. The committee will also
sponsor a series of teach-ins October 17, 18 and
19.
At other campuses today, students are ex-

t S. Africa
pected to take action - radical action at some
places. For example:
Students at Cornell University in Ithaca,
N.Y., will cap off a week of protests today with
an all-day teach-in, a boycott of classes, and a
rally outside a meeting of the school's board of
trustees..These students are trying to persuade
the school to divest its $147 million in South
Africa-related stocks. Wednesday 50 Cornell
students were arrested during a sit-in at the
main administratin building. In addition, four
others were arrested on Monday and Tuesday;
At the University of Colorado in Boulder,
students will be holding a teach-in featuring a
speech by Rep. Pat Schroeder (d-Colorado).

... ..... .............. ......... ....... ....... ............................................ ..........:.:..; ...............................,...., ... Y: "::: ":::::.l:.t':::.:Y:t'.Yi:.'.':."'.:Y:::. rcrc.... ........;..::.. ." Y'.".": rf 5 t
.... ........... .......... .. ............ ...
. ....... ......... .. .. .. ........ . ........ ...
............. ...... .... .......... .................... .... .::..; .................................. ... .... : . "... ... .. M1 ........... h:..
.V 1. 4. V
.... .. ... : ....... ......5 ..................... . . .. .. ?...
.... ........n .... t":.:L.,. .............: L:... .r; ....Y: r.:Y::..Y:.'.:YJ:: ""v:: .'::.......................rr.: r.:. J..:"..:. J. XN. h{"N::.:.." ....... "M1::.4 {'.M1 .:. . .
.... .. . ..........t.... .. . N 51.. ... ...L ............. ...... .... .................... ....... .....
. .n ,, . . .. h 4 .......................... ............................... ...
. .,.L ....... .......:............................................................. ................... ............................... t
C. ........................... ........ ...,............. ...... ... ...t......... ...:.. ""::::.;.;...............;..... :. n.. ;.m :nY:nY::..; ...r::mY::r" ..:r .t.:,h:{}r. { p.. ; :ti.
M1 : ., .. ... . .............1....

'M'l player
receives
deferred
sentence

By ANDREW ERIKSEN
Freshman basketball player Glen
Rice was ordered to perform 72 hours
of community service and pay $100 in
connection with a Sept. 13 incident at
Thompson and East Madison Streets
in which he allegedly shoved a
University student, knocking him to
the ground.
Rice received the deferred sentence
on Sept. 27 in 15th District Court. He

entered a plea of no contest to the
charge of assault and battery.
ACCORDING to court records, a
plea of not guilty was originally en-
tered by the court and a pre-trial
hearing was then set for bct. 28. But
the plea was latered changed to no
contest and Rice was placed on the
deferred sentence program.
John Cahill, a second year law

student and a resident director at
West Quad, filed a complaint against
Rice on Sept. 20. A warrent was then
issued for Rice's arrest.
Rice was arrested by Ann Arbor
Police on Sept. 27. He was released on
personal recognizance.
IF A DEFENDENT successfully
completes the terms of the deferred
sentence program, no criminal record

will result.
A review for Rice is scheduled for
March 28 in 15th District Court.
The maximum penalty for assault
and battery is 90 days in the County
Jail and a fine of $100.
Rice was named the best high
school basketball player in the state
last year. He attended Flint North-
western High School.

................... .......... ... . ... .. ........ .....................,..,.. .,.................................................... ......lflf
..... .. . .... ... ... ..... ... ... ..... .... .t .. ..... .... .. .. ... ...... ... .,... ......
A. . t . ........... ......". ....."..: ..........t....5.............. ...... .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .:.

IFC postpones Greek review panel

By MELISSA BIRKS
The Interfraternity Council last
night voted to refer a proposal, which
would combine a panel to help frater-
nities and sororities plan events with
a Panhellenic and IFC judiciary
board, back to committee.
The decision to postpone the vote
was made pending clarification and
improvements by the IFC con-
stitutional committee of some of the
proposal's points.
YESTERDAY'S Daily incorrectly
said the panel would be a type of court
which would discipline individual
Greek members accused of criminal
acts.
While the Greek Activities Review
Panel (GARP) will act as a judical
*body of IFC and Panhel, it will not
deal with criminal acts, said Allan

Lutes, president of IFC, and Anne
Morgan, vice president of Panhel.
"If disputes would fall into criminal
or major civil violations, then the
proper authorities would deal with
those problems," Lutes said.
"We don't handle criminal cases,"
Morgan added.
ANOTHER function of GARP is "to
eliminate past and possible future
problems with events such as Greek
Week and philanthropies." The panel
will help with organizational
problems to "improve the quality of
the event," Lutes said.
According to Lutes, GARP would
help with providing the proper
amount of security for an event, and a
safe alcohol policy, such as providing
alternative beverages. It would also
help obtain proper licenses and per-

mits for parties. GARP counsultation
is optional.
The most significant point of con-
flict involves a clause which grants
anonymity to any member pressing
charges at the judiciary board. This
clause, which was in the Panhellenic
constitution, has never been passed
by the IFC.
"IT OBSTRUCTS due process of
law" Lutes said, "namely that a per-
son has the right to face his accuser
and the right to cross examine."
Morgan agrees. "They want to
know who's pressing charges. I don't
think that's so unreasonable," she
said.
The judiciary portion of the
proposal is actually an already
existing part of the IFC constitution
which, according to Lutes, has been

inactive for about the last two years
because "IFC was lacking in
organizational areas prior to 1984."
IF PASSED, GARP will be open to
any and all complaints and disputes
between Greek chapters, between a
Greek chapter and a non-Greek party,
or between a chapter and IFC or
Panhel.
Lutes said he is certain that,
although GARP specifically urges the
conflicting parties to work out
problems among themselves first, the
judiciary party will become active af-
ter passage as a mediating device.
Greek members said they hope that
GARP, if passed, will help keep Greek
problems within the system at a
minimum.

U.S. intercepts
plane of hijackers.
ROME (AP) - An Egyptian African country, said the Washington
military airplane carrying the four sources, who spoke on condition of
Palestinians who hijacked an Italian anonymity.
luxury liner landed at a NATO base in They said after landing in Sicily the
Sicily early today, Italian officials plane was surrounded by U.S. Navy
said. SEALS, a specially trained unit, who
In Washington, administration and planned to take the terrorists off the
intelligence sources said American plane and turn them over to Italian
warplanes intercepted the Egyptian authorities.
737 jetliner while it was flying from At a press conference last night,
Cairo to Tunisia, and forced it to land White House Press Secretary Larry
in Sicily. Speakes said the U.S. government
During the flight, the Tunisian would request that the Italian
government - apparently heeding a government extradite the hijackers to
U.S. request to deny the hijackers the United States for criminal
sanctuary - refused they Egyptian prosecution for allegedly killing an
plane permission to land in that North American aboard the ship.

KTODAY-
Run for more than fun
IGMA NU Fraternity on campus is joining
forces with its brother chapter in East Lansing

Man or monster?
ALLOWEEN ARRIVED early in East
Pennsboro Township, Pennsylvania, as far
as police are concerned. A few residents

hairy creature, with long fangs and arms that extended
below his knees. Three officers were sent to investigate
and "one did hear the sound," Corbett said. "He
described it as like a screech, but with a gutteral, deep
down effect." But the chief said he believed the
creature was a costumer prankster starting alittle
early on Halloween. He was so convinced that after the

INSIDE
WEATHER: Sunshine with a high in the 60's.
APARTHEID: Opinion supports UN day of
protest. Page 4.

11

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan