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September 12, 1985 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1985-09-12

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 12, 1985
802 MONROE SOUTH AFRICA
ANN ARBOR, MI A series of discussions
Hi]5E 48104 FRIDAY NOON FORUM
(soupand sandwich available for $1.00)
Sponsored by THE GUILD HOUSE CAMPUS MINISTRY and
THE WASHTENAW COUNTY COALITION AGAINST APARTHEID
SEPTEMBER 13 PAQUETA PALMER, Local Activist
LEN SURANSKY from South Africa

Harvard study
finds home.
air polluted

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CHICAGO (UPI) - People breathe
in three times as many carcinogens
inside their own homes than out on the
street, even if they live in an in-
dustrial area, a Harvard researcher
said yesterday.
The effect is even worse for the
children of smokers, who run twice
the risk of developing leukemia if one
of their parents smokes and four
times the risk if both are smokers,
said Lance Wallace of the Harvard
School of Public Health.
"YOUR HOME might be more of a
toxic waste dump than the companies
and factories down the street," he
said.
Wallace, presenting a paper before
the American Chemical Society, said
the Harvard researchers originally
set out to investigate whether living
close to petrochemical plants and
other industry exposed a person to

greater amounts of dangerous
chemicals.
In 1981, the researchers equipped
more than 350 residents of Elizabeth
and Bayonne, N.J. with monitors to
test the air they were breathing for a
number of different chemicals.
THEY ALSO took samplings of food
and water from the subjects' homes,
as well as a breath sample every
evening.
"There was no difference between
the people living close to the plants
than farther away," he said.
Wallace said the levels of cancer-
causing agents was two to five times
higher indoors than outdoors, and in
some cases, there was 100 times more
of a particular compound inside the
house than in the backyard.
Common household items such as
cleansers, pesticides and room
deodorizers were the source of much
of the pollution, Wallace said.

Money isn 'tall that

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Today is the day to learn more
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matters to
(Continued from Page 1)
opened other stores. Now a worldwide
chain, Domino's will open its
headquarters in Ann Arbor in Decem-
ber.
THE CHAIN is expected to become
the second largest string of restaur-
ants in five years (McDonald's holds
first place). It has been so profitable
that the once-poor school boy can now
afford such luxuries as the $1 million
Duesenberg car he bought yesterday.
Wealth also allowed Monaghan to
invest in a baseball team, the Detroit
Tigers, whichhe purchasedtin 1983.
Shortly after he bought the team, he
asked his favorite player, Alan
Trammell, whether the shortstop
would switch places with his boss.
"Trammel readily agreed,"
Monaghan said, adding that he has
always loved baseball, but doubts
he'll ever play the sport.
But he does expect to leave
Domino's in four or five years
because he thinks he has taken the
business as far as it can go.
"I should like to do something real
worthwhile," Monaghan said in one of
his many references to his Christian
principles. "I'll be in a position to do
something really important for my

CALL
OR
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PAUL V. BAUERS, CLU
Insurance & Financial Services, Inc.
1-313-665-7287
1886 W. Stadium, Suite 108
Stadium Center
Ann Arbor, MI 48103

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longhan
fellow man. I feel it's an obligation."
Making money is low on
Monaghan's list of priorities, though it
certainly remains an important goal.
He told the group that he ranks in-
come after spiritual, social, mental,
and physical well-being, and that "it's
the love of money that is the root of
evil."
But later he added: "If you're a good
person, like I'm trying to be, you try
to make all the money you can."
Residents
complain
about new
keg policy
(Continued from Page 1)
or not to make the Couzens policy a
campus-wide alcohol policy.
"Hopefully, there will be consistency
throughout the housing division,"
Jackson said.
"You are aware that it is against
the law for minors to drink. It is state
law, and we will abide by the law," he
continued.
TIM MCHUGH, an LSA sophomore,
said he felt the new approach to kegs
would have a negative impact. "I
think that alcohol problems are going
to go behind closed doors. I don't think
people get drinking problems from a
keg party."
Other Couzens residents said they
thought the policy would ruin student
and residence staff relations.
Ken Sharpe, an engineering
sophomore, said it would hurt studen-
ts' social life.
"My feeling is he's not regressing
our drinking, he's regressing our
social life," said Sharpe. "A keg is
more reason for an open party."
Sharpe said that, to his knowledge,
the dorm hasn't had a keg party since
Jackson began as building director
this fall.
One resident remarked that the
dorm would turn into a freshman
dorm because of the strict policy,
while another said he
wouldn't have signed a lease this fall
if he had known about this policy.
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ESL TOLAW SCH1-- CLASSESFORMING NOW AT
662-3149
203 E. HooverN
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
5amy n ap nduI ac2oo Jlu EDUCATIONAL CENTER

IN BRIEF
COMPILED FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS AND
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS
Blacks, Asians riot in England
BIRMINGHAM, England - Mobs firebombed two stores and set cars
ablaze during a second night of rioting, and tensions between blacks and
Asians increased yesterday in Britain's second-largest city.
Minor violence was reported in London and Liverpool, raising fears
that the rampage in Birmingham might spread, resulting in a replay of
widespread rioting in 1981 in those cities and in Manchester.
About 1,400 police were deployed in Birmingham overnight, but ar-
sonists burned two stores, and several cars were overturned and set afire
in the rundown Handsworth district, which has a largely immigrant
population of Asians and West Indian blacks.
Police said 128 people were arrested in two days, including 92 Tuesday
on charges of looting and public disorder.
They said 10 police officers, three firemen and three civilians were in-
jured Tuesday night. Twenty-five police and three firemen were injured
Monday night.
Abkar Dad Khan of the Standing Conference of Pakistanis, an
organization that assists Pakistanis in Britain, said the Asian community
"is deeply hurt by what has happened and it has happened at the hands of
blacks."
Car bomb kills one in Lebanon
BEIRUT, Lebanon - A suicide bomber rammed a car packed with ex-
plosives into a checkpoint controlled by an Israeli-backed militia in
southern Lebanon yesterday, killing the driver and wounding at least two
militiamen, Israeli radio said.
In Beirut, Shiite Moslem militia leader Nabih Berri accused Israel of
holding three Lebanese prisoners from a batch of 119 freed Tuesday,
raising the possibility of a delay in the release of two Frenchmen kidnap-
ped in Beirut 112 days ago.
The suicide driver crashed an explosives-packed car into a checkpoint
manned by members of the Israeli-backed South Lebanon Army near the
village of Hasbaya in Israel's so-called "security belt" - a 3-to-11-mile
strip controlled by Israel to prevent Arab guerilla attacks on northern
Israel.
It was the eighth such suicide attack in southern Lebanon in two mon-
ths.
The Syrian Social Nationalist Party claimed responsibility for the at-
tack and identified the bomber as Mariam Kheiredine, 19, and said she
was driving a car packed with 660 pounds of explosives that rammed the
checkpoint.
Young fares well in primary,
DETROIT - Mayor Coleman Young's showing in Tuesday's primary
eleetion went right according to the script.
Young rolled up nearly two-thirds of the total vote against a field of 12;
challengers, and vowed yesterday to duplicate that performance on Nov.
5 when he faces underdog Tom Barrow in the nonpartisan general elec-
tion.
If that happens - and few doubt that it will - Young, 67, will roar into a
record fourth term in office with an overwhelming mandate from the
voters of the nation's sixth largest city.
"I plan to continue to mount the type of campaign I waged to date."
Young said. "I'm taking nothing for granted."
Young - whose campaign theme "Power for Tomorrow" was seen on
billboards across the city and heard repeatedly on television and radio
ads - called his primary win "as decisive a victory as could be expec-
ted."
Elected the city's first black mayor in 1973, Young had little trouble
getting re-elected in 1977 and 1981 as his power base - Detroit's black
majority - continued to grow.
Lutheran Church drops plans to
bar handicapped from ministry
MINNEAPOLIS - The American Lutheran Church, after a flood of
complaints, has dropped plans to bar severely disabled people from en-
tering the ministry, and advocacy groups for the handicapped said Wed-
nesday they are happy with the decision.
"It must be simply and forthrightly stated that the American Lutheran
Church does not categorically bar persons with disabilities," said David
Preus, the church's presiding bishop.
The church, which has 2.3 million members in 4,950 U.S. congregations
and is the smallest of the three major Lutheran denominations, said in a
statement in June that people with significant physical or mental han-
dicaps may not be suitable for the ministry.
That policy never took effect because it was submitted for a review by
church attorneys, who recommended that it be modified.
Herb David, a spokesman for the church, said the church's decision,
announced Friday, to drop the proposal was due more to the legal review
than public reaction, which he described as intense.
Scientists map one cold virus
WASHINGTON - Scientists said yesterday they have finally mapped
one of the tiny viruses that cause the common cold, raising hopes for vac-
cines or other drugs to fight any number of life-threatening or merely
pesky viral ailments.

The findings could lead to new progress against diseases ranging from
sniffles to multiple sclerosis to leukemia and perhaps even to the AIDS
virus, the lead researcher, said Purdue University Prof. Michael
Rossmann.
He said there was great scientific significance in his group's ability to
put together a three-dimensional map of a human virus - the first time
such a viral code has ever been cracked - making it possible to study
tiny interactions within the body.
Rossmann, whose team collaborated with a University of Wisconsin
group headed by Roland Rueckert, said there actually may never be a
one-shot vaccine for colds.
~T~g Abhcan u 9ax1fi
Vol XCVI - No. 6
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the Fall and Winter terms and Tuesday through Saturday
during the Spring and Summer terms by students at the University .of
Michigan. Subscription rates: through April - $10.00 in Ann Arbor; $20.00
outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and Sub-
scribes to United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles
Times Syndicate, and College Press Service.

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THURSDAY

Editor in Chief .................... NEIL CHASE
Opinion Page Editor ............ JOSEPH KRAUS
Managing Editors..........GEORGEA KOVANIS
JACKIE YOUNG
News Editor ................. THOMAS MILLER
Features Editor..............LAURIE DELATER
City Editor ................. ANDREW ERIKSEN
Personnel Editor..............TRACEY MILLER
NEWS STAFF: Jody Becker, Laura Bischoff, Nancy
Driscoll, Carla Folz, Rachel Gottlieb, Sean Jackson,
David Klapman, Vibeke Laroi, Carrie Levine, Jerry
Markon, Eric Mattson, Amy Mindell, Kery Mura-
kami, Christy Reidel, Stacey Shonk, Katie Wilcox.
Magazine Editor ............. RANDALL STONE
Arts Editor ..................CHRIS LAUER
Associate Arts Editors..............JOHN LOGIE
MoviesE...... ...........EBYRON L. BULL
Records....................BETH FERTIG
Books ..................... RON SCHECHTER
Theatre.................. NOELLE BROWER

Sports Editor .................... TOM KEANEY
Associate Sports Editors ............. JOE EWING
BARB McQUADE
ADAM MARTIN
PHIL NUSSEL
STEVE WISE
SPORTS STAFF: Dave Aretha, Eda Benjakul, Mark
Borowsky, Emily Bridgham, David Broser. Debbie
deFrances, Joe Devyak, Rachel Goldman, Skip
Goodman, Joh Hartmann, Steve Herz, Rich Kaplan,
Mark Kovinsky, John Laherty, Scott Miller, Brad
Morgan, Jerry Muth, Adam Ochlis, Mike Redstone,
Scott Shaffer, Howard Solomon.
Business Manager .......... DAWN WILLACKER
Sales Manager ............ MARY ANNE HOGAN
Assistant Sales Manager ...............YUNA LEE
Marketing Manager............CYNTHIA NIXON
Finance Manager...............DAVID JELINEK
DISPLAY STAFF: Sheryl Biesman, Diane Bloom.
Gayla Brockman, Debbie Feit, Jen Hayman, Greg
Leach, Debra Lederer, Sue McLampy, Kristine Mil-

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