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April 19, 1985 - Image 23

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-04-19
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fears. A curiously bitter script, fatally flawed by LADYHAWKE
F I RTmelodramatic hyperbole and stereotypically stiff Camp-adventure set in the Middle Ages; directed
F T characters who act tortured but are devoid of any by Richard Donner (Superman) and starring Mat-
real feelings. This is like an amateur play, written thew Broderick and Rutger Hauer. At the Movies at
T T NT and put on by a high school English class that has Briarwood, Briarwood Mall; 769-8780.

It U l~

AMADEUS
Director Milos Forman and author Peter Schaffer
decide to envision Mozart as a nineteenth century
equivalent of a talented but clownishly tem-
peramental pop star. The idea is refreshing, but the
execution lapses into just so many cheap laughs. Just
close your eyes and enjoy the soundtrack. At the
Movies at Briarwood, Briarwood Mall; 769-8780.
BEVERLY HILLS COP
Eddie Murphy goes through his usual fast jiving,
smart ass routines in this moderately amusing
thriller/comedy about a streetwise Detroit cop who
goes to California to investigate a friend's murder.
Tihe script is just a sketchy outline, existing solely for
Murphy to improvise around. Murphy's antics are
cute, even if they're strictly lowbrow. The laughs are
fast and plentiful, but lightweight, and you're always
aware of just how shabbily slapped together the
whole film is. At the Movies at Briarwood, Briar-
wood Mall; 769-8780.
BLOOD SIMPLE
Stylish, well calculated murder mystery,
reminiscent of Hitchcock and De Palma, though in-
ventive and unique enough to stand firmly on its own
without comparisons. At the State Theater, 231 S.
State; 662-6264.
THE BREAKFAST CLUB
Writer-director John Hughes (last of Sixteen Can-
dies) takes a bleak look at coming of age in modern
suburbia. The film centers on five kids, of diverse
background locked up together in the high school
library for a Saturday afternoon detention. As the
day progresses, the kids drop their guards and feel
each other out, sharing their mutual frustrations and

just finished reading a EugeneO'Neillplay. Very sin-
cere, but not particularly thoughtful. At the State.
Theater, 231 S. State St.; 662-6264.
THE CARE BEARS MOVIE
Animated fantasy based on the hugely successful
line of teddy bears. At the Movies at Briarwood,
Briarwood Mall, 769-8780
CAT'S EYE
Horror anthology written by Stephen King and
produced by Dino De Laurentis (now that's a scary
thought). At the Fox Village Theater, 375 N. Maple;
769-1300.
DESPERATELY SEEKING SUSAN
Well received contemporary comedy about a bored
housewife attempt to lead an alternate lifestyle.
At the Fox Village, 375 N. Maple, 769-1300
FRIDAY THE 13TH PART IV
Umpteenth variation on the psycho-stalking-teens
scheme. At the State, 231S. State; 662-6264.
GIRLS JUST WANT TO HAVE FUN
Low budget exploitation comedy based on the hit
pop song of the same name. Cyndi Lauper has no
connection with the film. At the Wayside, 3020
Washtenaw; 434-1782.
THE GODS MUST BE CRAZY
. A marvelously imaginative comedy about an
African bushman who mistakes a Coke bottle that
falls from an airplane as a dropped trinket of the
gods, and decides to try to return it. The laughs a-e
Apure slapstick, but ingenious and relentless. The
newest cult classic in town and deservedly so. At the
Movies at Briarwood, Briarwood Mall; 769-8780.

THE LAST DRAGON
Motown musical fantasy with a martial arts
theme. You figure that one out. At the Fox Village,
375 N. Maple; 769-1300.
MASK
Peter Bogdonavich's variation on the Beauty And
'The Beast theme. It's transplanted in California,
but this time it's about a pill-popping biker mother
and her monstrously deformed son. Bogdonavich
avoids all the Elephant Man metaphors and symbols
about ugliness to concentrate on a small, very witty
film about human resiliancy in the face of despair.
The film is warm and engaging; really a pleasant
surprise. At the Ann Arbor Theater, 210 S. Fifth
Ave.; 761-9701.
POLICE ACADEMY II
Sequel to last years lowbrow comedic romp, Police
Academy. At the State Theater, 231 S. State; 662-
6264.
PORKY'S REVENGE
Second sequel to the highly successful, endlessly
insipid Porky's. Need you be warned? At the Fox
Village. 375 N. Maple; 769-1300.
THE PURPLE ROSE OF CAIRO
Woody Allen's latest film, a romantic fantasy
about a Depression-age housewife (Mia Farrow)
whose only respite from the bitterness of life is to
escape into the local movie house and live out this
weeks musical or adventure. One day a character in
one of the films (Jeff Daniels) looks down into her
eyes, and decides to jump out of the screen into her
life. Somewhat gimmicky, and sentimentally
manipulative but it has more than a few moments of
truly enchanting sweetness and wit. Definitely wor-
thwhile. At the Movies at Briarwood, Briarwood

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CAMPUS

F I L

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F I __AY
BANANAS (Woody Allen, 1971)
A nice way of starting off the term's last Campus
Cinema section. The comedy is quite funny as Woody
Allen becomes dictator of a banana republic.
Howard Cosell does the play-by-play with more hair
than he has now. Also with Louise Lasser. (Alter-
native Action; MLB 4, 7:30 p.m.)
LOVE AND DEATH (Woody Allen, 1975)
One of the best comedies from the early Woody
Allen years. He and Diane Keaton do a lot of musing
about life while Napoleon is in the middle of invading
mother Russia. You will never be ableto read a
Russian writer with a straight face again. (Alter-
native Action; MLB 4, 9 p.m.)
EMMANUELLE, JOYS OF A WOMAN (Francis
Giacobetti, 1976)
Another one of those X-rated films that gives the
folks in East Lansing so much trouble. (Mediatrics;
MLB 3,7:30 p.m., 9:15 p.m.)
DIVA (Jean-Jacques Beiniex, 1982)
After a surprisingly long absence, one of the cam-
pus perennials returns. It is known as punk cinema
for its unusual cinematography and imagery. The
plot is about an ill-fated romance between a postal
clerk and an opera star. French with subtitles.
(Cinema 2; Aud. A, 7 p.m., 9:15 p.m.)
APOCALYPSE NOW (Francis Ford Coppola, 1979)
A film that has inspired some very diverse reac-
tions. Martin Sheen goes hunting for renegade officer
Marlon Brando in the jungles of Vietnam to ter-
minate him with extreme preudice. I find the whole
thing a bit tedious while many friends find it a great
film. Your choice. (Michigan Theater Foundation;
Michigan Theateir, 7p.m., 9:45 p.m.)
THE HAUNTING (Robert Wise, 1963)
The director of The Sound of Music was not always
sugar and spice and everything nice. Here he lends
his touch to a horror movie about a haunted New
England mansion. With Julie Harris, Russ Tamblyn,
and Claire Bloom. (Ann Arbor Film Coop; Nat. Sci.
Aud., 7p.m.)
PSYCHO (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)
A classic. Janet Leigh runs off to the Bates Motel
with some stolen money, and she stops being the star
of the movie when she starts taking her shower. An-
thony Perkins is splendid as a slightly insane hotel,
owner. Mother says I should recommend this. (Ann
Arbor Film Coop; Nat. Sci. Aud., 9 p.m.)
APOCALYPSE NOW (Francis Ford Coppola, 1979)
See yesterday's listing for details. (Michigan
Theater Foundation; Michigan Theater, 7 p.m., 9:45
p.m.)
PINK FLAMINGOS (John Waters, 1974)
The Ann Arbor Film Coop ends its semester with a

film starring Divine. (Ann Arbor Film Coop; MLB 4,
7 p.m., 10 p.m.)
REEFER MADNESS (Leo Gasnier, 1936)
But not all is Divine in life, and before or after the
Divine segment you can see an accidential comedy
on the evils of marijuana. (Ann Arbor Film Coop;
MLB 4, 8:45 p.m.)
MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL (Terry
Gilliam and Terry Jones, 1975)
The final visit this term for a comedy from the
English funnymen that looks at the Camelot legends
like they have never been looked at before. Not all
that hilarious, but worth seeing for some opening
credits that refuse to take themselves seriously.
(Alternative Action; MLB 3, 7 p.m., 8:40 p.m., 10:20
p.m.)
LIFE OF BRIAN (Terry Jones, 1978)
Playing a few yards down the sidewalk from the
Python bunch's look at Camelot, and at the exact
same times, is the same group's version of the life
and times of Jesus. Brian and the other guy keep on
getting confused. (Cinema Guild; Nat. Sci. Aud., 7
p.m.,8:40 p.m., 10:20p.m.)
GALLIPOLI (Peter Weir, 1981)
Mel Gibson stars in a movie about war. He and a
friend decide to leave the Australian outback behind
and enlist in the British army in World War I. The
British like the Australians for cannon fodder and
nothing more. Beautifully photographed, but severly
hampered by the absence of anything new to say.
From the director of Witness. (Cinema 2; Aud. A, '
p.m., 9 p.m.)

DAS BOOT (Wolfgang Peterson, 1982)
The German U-boat spends another night in Ann
Arbor. See yesterday's listing for details. (Michigan
Theater Foundation; Michigan Theater, 7 p.m., 9:40
p.m.)
WED NESDAIY
LIQUID SKY (Slava Tsukerman, 1983)
After finishing up classes, and before studying for
finals, take a few hours off and see some quantam
wierdness cinema. Aliens thrive on an opium
derivative produced during intercourse, and they kill
people to get it. A German scientist is hot on their
trail. Some wonderful lines delivered perfectly and
some very unusal cinematography make this an
evening you will remember. (Michigan Theatre
Foundation; Michigan Theatre, 7 p.m., 9:30 p.m.)
LIQUID SKY (Slava Tsukerman, 1983)
See yesterday's listing for details. (Michigan
Theater Foundation; Michigan Theater, 7 p.m., 9:30
p.m.)
NOTICE
This is the last Weekend magazine for the school
year. These listing are designed to tide you over until
you leave for the summer.

Anne Ban
Dustin Hof
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BORN IN FLAMES (Lizzie Borden, 1983)
The penultimate episode in a weekly series of films
dealing with the concerns of women. This one is an
experiment set in New York City, the site of an
imaginary Social Democratic revolution. (Alter-
native Action and Women's Studies; Aud. A, 7 p.m.,
FREE)
CHARLOTTE'S WEB (Charles Nichols and Iwao
Takamoto,1972)
An animated version of the classic children's novel
by E.B. White in which Charlotte the spider teaches
children everywhere the meaning of the word
salutations. The voices include Agnes Moorehead,
Debbie Reynolds and Paul Lynde. A good way to
regress back to childhood as you start the last week
of classes. (Michigan Theatre Foundation; Michigan
Theater, 4 p.m., 7p.m.)
V *nA

p1

I

DINER (Barry Levinson, 1982)
As the sixties are about to begin, some friends eat
and chat in a Baltimore dine. From the director of
The Natural. (Michigan Theatre Foundation;
Michigan Theater, 7 p.m., 9:15 p.m.)
THE DECAMERON (Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1970)
An adaptation of a collection of stories from 14th
century Italy. The telling is a bit explicit, and the
film is rated X. Italian with subtitles. (Cinema
Guild; MLB 3,7 p.m., 9 p.m.)
CASABLANCA (Michael Curtis, 1942)
Bogart. Bacall. A kiss is still a kiss and a classic is
still a classic. My recommendation would be super-
flous. (Cinema 2; Aud. A, 7p.m., 9p.m.)
iS:A T SU DU A Y
THE GRADUATE (Mike Nichols, 1967)
Cinema 2 ends the semester with a classic comedy.

WE WILl
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DAS BOOT (Wolfgang Peterson, 1982)
With all the Monday night freebies done for the
term, film junkies will have to head down to the
Michigan and watch this highly praised entry from
Germany. It tells the story of the men on board a
German U-boat during World War II, and gives all
the cramped, crowded conditions their due. German
with subtitles. (Michigan Theater Foundation;
Michigan Theater, 7 p.m., 9:40 p.m.)

18, Weekend/Friday, April 19, 1985

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