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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 19, 1985 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-04-19
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



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U-M: The Best and Worst of Times____

I

Best Book

sI

With hundreds of new books released each day, it's nearly impossible to
peruse the vast literary market for a comprehensive "best" selection.
What's a book reviewer to do without a staff of hundreds? But here it is, for
what it's worth: a small but noteworthy selection of some of the most in-
teresting and evocative books of the past year (1984-85). Ignoring market
status (we'll leave that to you-know-what Sunday b.s. list), this list is com-
piled with an eye peeled for politically stimulating works, new authors, first
novels, and quality literature that forfeits the dubious honor of placing on
the glittery best-seller list.

characteristic light humor. Chaim
Potok's Davita's Harp is not the
author's most'outstanding but is
nonetheless very good ; like Potok's
previous work's, this one portrays a
character's struggles with religion
(this time, a girl's) and her
disturbing family history. In addition:
Jayne Anne Phillips' Machine Dreams,
Don Delillo's White Noise, Todd McEwen's
Fisher's Hornpipe, and Janice Kincaid's
Annie John.
Best Poetry
The year's crop of poetry yielded two
wonderful collections: S. Ben Tov's
During Ceasefire (strongly political
and feminist, a first work), and Molly
Peacock's Raw Heaven (raw indeed in

its psycho
fessional im
However,
poetry to
sberg's Col
great poeti
century Wh
literary tbe
the century
good colle
Collected P
Warren's C
Shultz's Dee
Best Books
book edito
fers Sue
Mary Berl
and Ron Sc

Best Non-fiction
Atop the eighties surge of literature
on Vietnam, a notable book on Viet-
nam veterans has emerged: Bloods
(An Oral History of the Vietnam War by
Black Veterans), by Wallace Terry.
Bloods portrays a handful of black
veterans-infantry, officers, supply
workers-from a variety of backgroun-
ds, most often big city ghettoes or deep
rural South. The book drives home the
idea of a white man's war fought by
lower classes, and of a military
disproportionately represented by
minorities; in all, driving, powerful
reading.
Also of note: Joe Klein's Payback,
similarly following the stories of five
veterans; Charlie Clements' Witness to
War, the story of an American doctor
serving behind rebel lines in El
Salvador;
The True Confessions of an Albino
Terrorist, by Breyten Breytenbach,
telling the seven-year ordeal of an im-
prisoned writer in South Africa;
Wyman's The Abandonment of the
Jews, documenting America's

negligent role in the Jewish Holocaust.
Even more: Studs Terkel's "The Good
War", an eye-opening oral history of
World War II; Waiting: The Whites of
South Africa, by Vincent Crapanzano, a
fascinating exploration of the op-
pressors of apartheid; From Time Im-
memorial, by Joan Peters, a con-
troversial expose of Palestinian
history; and The Invisible Children, by
Gitta Sereny, documenting child
prostitution in Europe and America.
Best Fiction
My personal favorite was Bright
Lights, Big City, by Jay McInerney. A
fun, fast-paced work that plunges into
hedonistic New York night, this book is
as heady and speedy as a snort of the
white stuff, and it sets McInerney as
one of the most promising young
writers in years to come.
Also among the best is Milan Kun-
dera's The Unbearable Lightness of
Being, a very enjoyable read in which
the author blends spheres of communist
politics, fantasy, sexual passion, Niet-
zchian metaphysics, all with his

-D
Z
w
Y
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Look familiar?: Before the bars close it's known at Taco Bell

(Continued from Page 13)
Best Place To Go
When You're Drunk
Taco Bell
You awaken on a Saturday morning

with both beer and burritos (buh-ree-
toes) on your breath. The tastes bring
back memories of the night before.
They closed the bar, and the munchies
struck; Taco Bell was the only remedy.
After all, what else is cheap, convenien-
tly located and open at 2:30 a.m.?

Worst Walk Between Classes
B-school to Frieze
It's long. It's cold (in the winter). It's
a general pain-in-the-neck. It's the wor-

st walk - the trek from the Business
School to Frieze or vice versa. Until the
sidewalk is paved from North to central
campus, this walk will continue to cap-
ture the worst walk around.

bi
-
1- --
Come to Kerrtwn for all the good things in life - Good food, fine
furniture, crafts, knitting and weaving supplies, gifts, cookware,
toys, clothing, jewelry, soaps, candles, paper goods, pottery, fresh
pasta and futons.
Kerrytown has everything you want, seven days a week. We're
open until 8 on Friday, noon to 5 Sunday and 10-6, M-Thurs., 9-5 Sa'-
urday. Parking is abundant in our lot or next door in the Farmers
Market. And we're jus t a short walk from main campus.
Kerrytown Shops
35 shops and restaurants in a village setting
N. Fourth and Fifth Avenues, Ann Arbor 662-4221

-V
Kerrytown
COME TAKE A
WALK OR BIKE RIDE!

IRKI

For The Best In
Updated Traditional
Clothing .. .
Everything For The Man
APPAREL FOR WOMEN
306 - 310 S. STATE ST., ANN ARBOR

-......s..r-
._

-N

SEAFOOD MARKET

Come in and check out
the greatest selection of
fine fresh & frozen
SEAFOOD!

including
Sashimi Items & the best variety of smoked fish
in town!
Open M-F 8-6, Sat. 7-5
407 N. Fifth Ave. KERRYTOWN 662-5118
SIGN UP NOW FOR MAY CLASSES!

OVERLOA
The University Cella
the BESToverall buyba
in town.
We pay 50% or more of current list pri
rent editions reported for usage in futui
If your book has been dropped from i
class, we will offer you a top wholesa
Trade books, (those small, prepriced, 1
books of mass market variety), generall
to 33% of the original cover pri
Old editions have no value, so don't si
books for too long!
Our buyback people are committed to I
excellent prices, and honest explanatic
your student bookstore.
Open weeknights until 8pm April 29th throe
University c
341 East Liberty. The Official Bookstore of the Univ

I'VE N
A Revt

THAT SONG BEFORE
he Music of Jule Styne
din.17-21,1985
I fr the Performing Arts

YARNS FOR
WEAVINCG,
KNITTING,1
CROCHETING,
& RUGMAKING.
BASK ETRY
SUPPLIES
Wild Weft-
407 N. 5th Ave. (Kerrytown)
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Telephone: 31 3 / 761-2466

WEAVING
& SPINNING
EQUIPMENT.
CLASSES.
DYES.
BOOKS.

Power Cent

Tickets at $5 and $3 avail
PTP Box Office, Michigar
Call 764-0450.

at the
caue.

/THE,
SERIES

14 Weekend/Friday, April 19, 1985.

. . . . m .Weekend/Eria

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