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April 12, 1985 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-04-12

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The Michigan Daily- Friday, April 12, 1985- Page 3
Seven faculty members
net Guggenheim awards

By STACEY SHONK
The Simon Guggenheim Memorial
Foundation has awarded seven Univer-
sity faculty members research
fellowships averaging $20,000 in its 61st
annual competition. One professor has
rescinded the offer after receiving
another fellowship, however.
The fellowships - totalling more
than $5 million - are designed to
release faculty members from their
teaching responsibilities for one year in
order to give them more time for their
respective studies.
AMONG THE 270 scholars, scientists,
and artists chosen from over 3,500 ap-
plicants are University faculty mem-
bers William Alexander, professor of
English; Daniel Fisher, associate
professor of geological sciences and
associate curator of the Museum of
Paleontology; and Peter Grant,
professor of biology.
Donald Regan, a professor of law and
philosophy was chosenalso, as was
Margaret Cool Root, associate
professor of classical and Near Eastern

art and archaeology and associate
curator of the Kelsey Museum of Ar-
chaeology, and Thomas Toon, associate
professor of English.
The awards are granted "on the basis
of demonstrated accomplishment in the
past and strong promise of the future,"
according to a spokesperson from the
Foundation.
"AMONG research awards, the
Guggenheim fellowship is one of
themost distinguished and
prestigious," said Jack Meiland,
associate dean of LSA. "I think it
reflects well on the University that we
received so many.".
Of 99 competing institutions, the
University ranked seventh in the num-
ber of faculty members awarded
Guggenheim fellowships. The Univer-
sity of California at Berkeley led the
pack with 12 awards. Yale and Harvard
Universities followed with 10 and nine,
respectively. The University of

Chicago, Columbia University, and
Cornell University tied with eight
fellowships each.
With the fellowships, University
professors will research an array of
subjects.
Alexander said the Guggenheim
award will allow him "to study the use
of theatre, film, video, and teaching in a
way that empowers audiences and
students . . . and disrupts the status
go." He will begin his research in
January, after he returns from a
semester sabbatical in Lima, Peru.
Fisher said his fellowship will fund an
investigation of the extinction of
mastodons in the Great Lakes Region
some 10,000 years ago. Grant on the
other hand, said he will incorporate 10
of field work into a book about the
evolution of Darwin's finches in the
Galapagos Islands now that he can take
time off under Guggenheim sponsor-
ship.

What's that sound?
Several children from Redford, MI. play near1
University's museums.

the diag yesterday. They were part of a Brownie Troop visiting the

young men 16-35

SYMBOL.. .

-HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
If a traditional job is not foreyou, come to the Alternative Career Fair at
East Quad today and tomorrow. It is sponsored by East Quad. and includes a
panel discussion on alternative careers at 7 tonight, in room 126, East Quad.
Films
AAFC-The Decline of Western Civilization, 7 p.m., D.O.A,, 9 p.m., MLB
4.
Alt. Act. - Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, 7 p.m.; You Can't Take It With
You, 9:15 p.m., Nat. Sci. Auditorium.
AAFC/CG2-Stranger Than Paradise, 7, 8:40, & 10:20 p.m., Aud. A,
Angell.
Romanian Film Festival - Friendship's Ambassadrs - American -
Romanian Friendship; Nicholas Titulescu; Poiana Brasov, 7:30 p.m., lecture
room 2, MLB.
Astrofest - Jim Loudin shows space shuttle films and slides, 7:30 p.m.,
MLB 3.'
Performances
Performance Network - Extremities, 8 p.m., 408 W. Washington Street.
School of Music - Dance students recital, 8 p.m., Studio A, Dance
Building; Contemporary Directions Ensemble, 8 p.m., Rackham
Auditorium, Hill Auditorium.
UM Mime Troupe - Forever Mime! , 8p.m., Schorling Auditorium,
School of Education Building.
Ark - John Hartford, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., 637 S. Main Street.
PTP - Cloud 9, 8p.m., Trueblood Theater, Frieze Building.
Pound House Children's Center - Peter "Madcat" Ruth, benefit concert,
8p.m., Ballroom, Union.
Residential College - Residential College Singers and Chamber Or-
chestra, 8p.m., Auditorium, East Quad.
Speakers
Center for Afroamerican and African Studies - David Ndaba, "The
Current Stage of the Resistance Movement in South Africa," noon, West
Conference Room, Rackham Building.
Natural Resources - William Banzhaf, "Ethics and Other Elements of
Forestry Consuting Practices," 3:30 p.m., room 1040, Dana Building.
School of Art - Edward Emschwiller, speaking on his work, 7 p.m., Art
and Architectural Auditorium, School of Art Building.
Plant Physiology - Rep. from Beckman Instrument Co., "Nontoluene
Solvents for Liquid Scintillation Counting - A Less Toxic and Less Expen-
sive System," noon, room 1139, Nat. Sci. Building.
College of Engineering - William Reynard, "NASA"s aviation Safety
Reporting System," 3:30 p.m., room 115, Aerospace Engineering Building;
Lee Feldkamp, "3-D X-Ray Computed Technology," 3:45 p.m., White
Auditorium, Cooley Building.
Woman Law Students Association - Catharine MacKinnon, 3:45 p.m.,
room 150, Hutchins Hall, Law School.
-Extracellular Matrix Group - Steve Ledbetter, "Structure and Function
of Basement Membrane Proteoglycans and Changer in Disbetes," noon,
room 5732, Med. Sci. II Building.
Business Administration - John MacKrell, "CAD
/CAM: Products and Markets," 2p.m., Michigan Room, Assembly Hall.
West European Studies/Museum of Art/History of Art - Richard Turner,
"Poetry and Power in Italian Renaissance Landscape," 8 p.m., Hale
Auditorium, School of Business Administration.
Meetings
Chinese Students Christian Fellowship -. 7:50 p.m., Memorial Christian
Church, corner of Hill and'Tappan Streets.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Study - 7:30 p.m., basement, University Refor-
med Church, 1001 E. Huron Road.
Korean Christian Fellowship -9 p.m., Campus Chapel.
International Students Fellowship -7 p.m., for ride, call 994-4669.
Union Counseling Services - Dissertation support group, 8:30 a.m., room
3100, Union Counseling Services.
Information Systems Planning/Education - ASI Users, 10:30 a.m.,
Regents Conference Room, Fleming Administration Building.
Student Legal Services - Director's meeting, 3:30 p.m., Conference
Room, Office of the Vice President of Student Services, Union.
Miscellaneous
Theosophical Society - "Practical Meditation in Daily Life," 3 p.m.,
Pelletier Gallery, 213% S. Main Street.
Bridge Club -7:30 p.m., Michigan League.
Michigan Gay Undergraduates - Spring dance, 9:30 p.m., Law School
Lounge.
International Folk Dance Club - Teaching, 8 p.m.; open request, 9:30
p.m., Angell Elementary School, 1608 S. University.
People's Food Co-op/Wildflour Bakery - Birthday party for People's Co-
op and Wildflower Bakery, 7 p.m., Friends Meetinghouse, 1420 Hill Stret.
American College of Nurses - Midwives Certified Nurse-Midwives of
the University of Michigan's Women's Hospital/School of Nursing-"What
is a Nurse-Midwife?" 7p.m., Ann Arbor Pubic Library, 343 S. Fifth Street.

School of Art -- Bachelor of Fine Arts show of mixed media, Slusser
Gallery, Rackham Building.

'Warring'frats battle
with bottle rockets

t E"OF THE MAN WHO
*RECEIVES IN GIVING"
FRANCISCANS
DIRECTOR OF VOCATIONS, FRANC ISCANS,-TOR
lE2006EDGEWATE'R PARKWAY
SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 20903
Plase send me the free booklet at no obligation.

By NADINE LAVAGNINO
and ERIC MATTSON
Two fraternities near South Quad last
night exchanged a 20-minute barrage of
fireworks, resulting in a small fire on
the roof of one fraternity that was
quickly extinguished.
The battle between Chi Psi, located at
620 S. State and Theta Delta Chi, at 700
S. State ended at 10:20 p.m. just before
police and fire units rolled in.
About 100 near-by residents gathered
in the wake of the exchange to jeer the
police. But by 10:50 p.m., the crowd had
cleared.
Batallion Chief Robert Murphy of the
Ann Arbor Fire Department said the
students were "just over zealous.
There's not much chance of a fire now,
he said.
Last night's exchange was part of the-
annual bottle rocket war between the
two frats.
The 'extravaganza traditionally
begins when Theta Delta Chi sounds a
tape of Ride of the Valkries, by Richard
Wagner. It is the theme song from the
movie Apocolypse Now.

Theta Delta Chi fraternity members
said the song was a favorite of Adolph
Hitler.
"They start the music and rockets
just go off," said a member of the Chi
Psi fraternity house who refused to be
named.
The battle usually takes place during
the first couple of weeks in April.
Theta Delta Chi fraternity members
said they purchased their ammunition
with their own pocket money. "We
picked up the rockets on our way down
to Texas over ,spring break," said a
member of the fraternity who would
only be identified as Greg.
According to Chi Psi members, this is
the first year the fire trucks came to the
annual event.
Theta Delta Chi members said they
are the victors.
Some passers-by were bewildered by
the event.
"I heard the rockets blocks away,
and could smell the gunpowder at least
100 yards away," said Mark Wood a
student at Eastern Michigan University
who was walking by the area during the
war.

Name

MDM
age

Address

oketre City StateZip
(Check preference) Priesthood Brotherhood
THE MOST IMPORTANT SUMMER OF YOUR LIFE
3 SPECIAL PROGRAMS FO
COLLEGE STUDENTS
" SCUBA DIVING TOUR
includes windsurfing and diving certification
" MASADA STUDENT TOUR
a 4 week tour of Israel
" MASADA COLLEGE SEMINAR PROGRAM
a 6 week seminar program
All programs are co-educational and include:
" guided tours hiking camping
" swimming " snorkeling " sports
" folk dancing " conversational " creative outdoor
" meet Israeli Peers hebrew seminars
" supervision by " home hospitality s kosher foods
* fish-speaki g"medical fclities
staff
For free color brochures and information, call or write:
MASADA ISRAEL SUMMER PROGRAMS
ZOA House, 4 East 34th Street, NewoYork, N.Y.10016
(212) 481-1500 Out of New York State call
Toll Free (800) 847-4133
For info on campus, call 663-4677 (Debbie)
REGISTER EARLY - LIMITED SPACE AVAILABLE

VOICE nabs top spot

(Continued from Page 1)
HE SAYS HE will remain in Ann Ar-
bor during the summer and intends to
"keep an eye on the code, and possibly
continue working on increased minority
recruitment and retention if (Black
Student Researcher Roderick) Linzie
stays.
Michaels said he was not disappoin-
ted that he lost.
"We created 12 moderate seats on the
assembly, earned 600 more votes than
the winning party did last year, and
raised the important issues of the role
of student government on campus," he
said.
Students voted 6-to-1 in favor of the
continuation of a mandatory fee per
student per term to fund MSA. The in-
crease of the fee from $4.75 to $5.07 was
accepted as part of the proposal.
Students also were overwhelmingly
in favor of question B. which may help
place some mandatory fee assessments
on tuition statements that are not
currently listed. These fees include, but
are not limited to, $55 for the Health
Services and $15.71 for Intramural and
Recreational Facilities. Proposal B
passed by a 9 to 1 margin.
Ballot question C also passed with a 4
to 1 margin in favor of the student body
voting on a code of nonacademic
student conduct before the assembly
Teacbhers
fired
(Continued fromrn Page 1)
Cranbrook. The comrnittee found no
evidence of discrimination at the other
two schools.
The teachers told investigators they
used the symbols. not to discriminate
against Jewish applicants, but to divide
Jewish students more.-evenly between
morning and afternoon sessions.
LILLIAN Bauder, president of the
Cranbrook Educational Community,
said the teachers responsible for the
symbols will leave at the end of the
school year.
"We will not have them here next
fall," Bauder said. "It was poor
judgement. It gave the appearance of
impropriety. It is wrong."
The three teachrs who selected an-

can ratify or vote it down. MSA must
accept a code before it can be instituted
by the administration.

G G

An event you won't want to
miss. As part of this campus
community, your participat-

w1RTh

model cars and trucks. GET
OFF TO A GREAT START
WITH FORD ON THE

I

r

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