100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 03, 1985 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

Baseball
vs. Indiana (DH)
Saturday, 1:00 p.m.
Ray Fisher Stadium

SPORTS

Softball
vs. Toledo (DH)
Today, 3:00 p.m.
'M' Varsity Diamond

the Michigan Daily Wednesday, April 3, 1985 Page 7

Wolverine batsmen

defeather Falcons

By CHRIS GERBASI
Nobody's perfect.
Not the Michigan Wolverine base -
ball team, which ran its record to 16-0
yesterday with 4-1 and 6-2 victories over
Bowling Green.
NOT PITCHER Jim Agemy, who
struck out seven batters in 61/3 innings
to work in the second game.
No, nobody's perfect, at least if you
talk to Agemy and coach Bud Mid-
daugh.
"I thought I threw okay," said
Agemy. "But I think I can throw a lot
better. I've improved a little bit every
time out."
AGEMY (3-0) improved enough
yesterday to mow down the Falcons
(now 11-7) before giving way to Dan
Disher in the seventh inning of the
--second game. Agemy allowed only six
hits and one run.
Still, Middaugh worked with Agemy
throughout the game. "We were
working on his breaking pitch," said
Middaugh. "Sometimes, I like to give a
pitcher a workout within a game and
I'll do that a lot when they're struggling
with a pitch.''

The batters from both teams did most
of the struggling during the cold day.
The two teams produced only eight hits
in the first game and 13 in the second.
IN THE nightcap, the Wolverines
scored four runs in the third to give
themselves a 5-0 lead behind Agemy.
The key hit was a two-run triple to the
base of the wall in left-center by Barry
Larkin. The drive, which scored Eddie
Woolwine and Mike Watters, also
knocked out starter and loser Todd Hall
(1-3).
Larkin eventually scored on a
fielder's choice by Chris Gust and then
Falcon reliever Carl Moraw really pit-
ched his way into a jam. Moraw walked
Matt Siuda and C.J. Beshke to load the
bases and then booted an easy ground
ball off the bat of Randy Wolfe to allow
the fourth run of the inning to score.
Earlier, Michigan had scored the fir-
st run of the game without the aid of a
hit. Ken Hayward led off the second
with a walk and moved around to third
on a sacrifice and a passed ball.
THEN MIDDAUGH pulled a suprise.
Hayward, not noted for his fleet feet,
took off for home on a straight steal at-

tempt. Bowling Green catcher Dave
Oliverio, perhaps out of suprise,
perhaps out of the terror of the 6-4, 225-
pound Hayward barreling towards him,
dropped the pitch as the two collided.
"It wasn't a case of who was running,
it was that the pitcher was slow out of
his windup," said Middaugh. "At that
point it was a no-score game, and if
they're going to give us a run, I'll take
it."
In the opener, the Wolverines also
scored their first run without a base hit,
when a wild pitch by Chuck Steward (1-
1) scored Watters in the first.
BOWLING GREEN tied the game in
the third however, when Michigan star-
ter Dave Karasinski walked the bases
loaded and was relieved by junior tran-
sfer Greg Everson. Everson came in
with a 2-0 count on clean-up batter
Kevin Ward and proceeded to throw
two more balls.
Nonetheless Everson, a righthander
out of Livonia, gained credit for his first
win as a Wolverine, thanks to a run-
scoring single by Casey Close in the
fourth. The game-winning RBI was
Close's sixth of the season, tops on the

team.
The 16-0 start' by Michigan has
catapulted the team to a number seven
ranking by Collegiate Baseball
magazine. But things aren't going per-
fectly, according to Middaugh.
"TODAY'S NOT really a good day to
make evaluations (because of the
weathe.r)," said Middaugh. "I'm
pleased with the position people, but
I'm still not really happy with what's
happening on the mound."
Is the coach just being modest?
"Well, every coach is concerned
about something and most coaches
would probably say the same thing as
me," the coach said. "But I wish we
were further along in the pitching. The
number of runs we've scored has offset
that somewhat, but if it doesn't im-
prove, we'll have problems."
Practice makes perfect.

Agemy Larkin
... seven strikeouts ... two-run triple

SPORTS OF THE DAILY:

Spartans nip

M' nesters

By EDA BENJAKUL

11

Come home to Roosevelt

this summer

a.

and earn additional credits.

Put your summer vacation to
good use by taking courses at
Roosevelt University's Chicago
or Arlington Heights Campuses.
This summer Roosevelt will
offer a complete range of
courses in arts and sciences,
business, education and music.
You'll benefit from small class
sizes taught by professional
instructors who take the time to
make learning a personal
experience.-
Thinking of working full or
part-time this summer?
Downtown Campus
430 S. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL 60605-1394

Go ahead. Roosevelt's conven-
ient locations and class sched-
ules let you earn credits while
you're earning cash, too.
Classes are held days, eve- "
nings and weekends through-
out the summer. Terms begin
May 15 and July 8. So come
to Roosevelt and take back the
credits you need to bring you.
closer to a degree.
Call (312) 341-2000 for a
summer course schedule and
admission information.
Northwest Campus
410 N. Arlington Heights Road
Arlington Heights, IL 60004

It was a long day for the Michigan
women's tennis team as it was defeated
by Michigan State 5-4, after leading 4-2
following singles action.
"We played well enough to win," said
first year coach Bitsy Ritt. "But when it
came down to the big points, State was
tougher."
NUMBER ONE singles player Paula
Reichert easily disposed of the Spar-
tan's Mary Alonso, 6-0, 6-0.. "She was
having a bad day, and I was having a
good day. It was a lot closer last year
when I played her," said Reichert.
Reichert's doubles - partner, Leslie
Mackey, did not fare as well as she lost
6-3, 4-6, 7-5, to Trish van der Brink. In
third singles Tina Basle won her match
against Traci Balanga; 6-3, 7-5, as did
number four Monica Borcherts; 6-0, 3-6,
6-2 over the Spartan's Kim Medd.
It was the number six player, Erin
Ashare who put the Wolverines up 4-2
before the doubles were played by
downing State's Kristen Streng. The
nailbiting match went down to the wire
as a third set tie breaker was played
which went to five games instead of the.
usual three. Ashare won the match 6-2,
3-6, 6-7.
THE FIRST doubles team of Reichert
and Mackey got off to a slow start as.
they lost the first set 6-4 to Balagna and
van der Brink. Things progressed from
.bad to worse as they wound up losing
the match, 6-4, 1-6, 6-4.
Basle and Ashare went three sets
against Alonso and Lisa Romeo. They
lost the first set 1-6 came back to win
the second set 6-3, and almost pulled in
the last set. After being down 5-0 in that
final set, the Michigan duo came back
to make it 5-4, before losing the set 6-4.
The doubles combination of Tricia
Horn and Borcherts got off to a good
start against State's Medd and Streng.
Their aggressive style of play payed off
during the first games of the set, but the
twosome got sluggish towards the end
of the set and lost in a tie breaker, 7-6. It
was this second doubles match turned
out to be the deciding 'factor as
Michigan and State had by that time
tied at four matches apiece.
Tankers 15th in nation
Gliding to a 15th place finish in the
NCAA swimming competition, the
Wolverine men's squad scooped up a
fair share of accolades with seven
members stacking up All-American
honors. The team scored 66 points in
three days of events, finishing ahead of
top-ranked Big Ten opponents Indiana

and Iowa.
One of the top finishers in the meet
was freshman Jan-Erick Olsen out of
Odda, Norway. Olsen managed a 14th
place finish in the 100-yard breastroke
with a time of 56.00, but didn't earn his
All-American honors until the 200-yard
breastroke event, when he cranked out
a 12th place finish, setting a new school
and Big Ten record of 2:01.16.
But without the diving prowess of
seniior captain Kent Ferguson and
junior Bruce Kimball, the tankers
wouldnot have been able to place so
high in the meet.
Ferguson took All-American honors
in both the diving events, finishing
eighth in the one-meter board and
fourth in the three-meter. Kimball also
finished in the money, placing 11th and
10th in the one and three-meter com-
petition, earning him All-American
honors for the third straight year.
But, it, was not all individual honors
that led to the team's excellent-
showing, as Mike Creaser, Gary An-
tonick, Joe Parker and Dave' Kerska
poured it on to take 11th place and gain
All-American status in the 400-yard
freestyle relay with a time of 2:58.82.
-EMILY BRIDGHAM
Linksters swing into action
The 1985 Michigan golf team is back

in Ann Arbor after a Florida swing
where it participated in both the Spring
Tournament and the Southern Florida
Invitational.
The Wolverines putted their way to
an 11th place finish at the Invitational
in Tampa. They were led by team cap-
tain Dan Roberts, who carded a 74-75-80
for the three-round event.
"IT WAS A predictable finish
because all of the southern schools we
played were good and prepared," said
Michigan coach Jim Carras. "Four, in
fact, were ranked in the top 20."
Carras may sound a bit uneasy about
his team, but when asked of the poten-
tial that Roberts possesses the coach
responded, "He is unquestionably our
best player this year."
Roberts, an All-Big Ten selection who
averaged 75.8 last year may well be the
premiere golfer in the conference this
year. Referring to the big senior's off
par tally at the Invitational, Carras
noted, "Itsdoes not reflect his ability.
He has a solid game and is one of the
finest golfers the team has seen in
years."
CARRAS WAS UNSURE about how
this week's Big Ten Opener at Purdue
will go. "It's a big question mark," he
said.
-JIM LANTOS

Softballers set to

Z ROOSEVELT UNIVERSITY
College of Arts and Sciences * Walter E. Heller College of Business Administration * Chicago Musical College
College of Continuing Education * College of Education * Graduate Division
------------ SENDTODAY!------ -------------ao
ROOSEVELT UNIVERSITY, Office of Public Relations - 430S. Michigan Avenue - Chicago, Illinois 60605-1394

strike for 1
By SCOTT SHAFFER
Now that their spring trip to Califor-
nia is in the books, the members of the
Michigan softball team have only one
more chance to prepare for their Big
Ten season opener. That chance comes
today when Wolverines take on
Toledo in a doubleheader at the varsity
diamond at 3:00 p.m.
The softball squad returns home from
the West Coast with a 6-6 mark after
getting off to a 4-0 start. Although two of
the losses were against the nation's
number nine team, Cal Poly-Pomona,
the real reason behind the team's
" slump is hitting. Michigan's team bat-
ting average is currently .170.
DESPITE the hitting problems, the
outlook for the upcoming season inr
bright. Northwestern, led by strikeout
queen Lisa Ishakawa, is favored to
repeat as Big Ten champions. But'
Wolverine head coach Carol Hutchins
feels that her team is capable of win-
ning the conference.
"If all of our basics are solid, we can
definitely contend with Northwestern."
Hutchins said. The first year head
coach also listed Minnesota and In-
diana among the stronger clubs in the
seven team Big Ten (three schools do
not field softball teams).
According to Hutchins, the pitchers

eague title
are the teams strongest unit. "We have
four pitchers and we plan to use them
all. That is a very deep staff for the Big
Ten and it can only help us."
THE PROBABLE starters for today are
Michelle Bolster and Vicki Morrow, but
Mari Foster and Julie Clark should also
get some work.
The hurlers are performing well, but
Hutchins would like to see a few more
strikeouts before April 5, the day the
Wolverines begin conference play by
taking on the Wildcats in a road game.
The defensive play of the Wolverines
is another cause for optimism. The
team has been fielding at .976 rate, led
by the glove work of shortstop Lisa
Panetta. "Lisa has been playing great
defense. She's been keeping us in game
with her fielding," Hutchins said after
yesterday's practice.
WHEN THE hitting does come
around expect Alicia Seegert to be at or
near the top in most of the team's offen-
sive categories. Seegert, the team's
catcher, won the Big Ten batting title as
a freshman last year with a .418
average in conference play.
Last year's entire starting outfield
graduated, so there will definitely be a
new look to the starting lineup. Expec-
ted to fill the void are Marci Smith,
Linda Allen, and Mari Foster (when
not pitching).

Please send me further information for
study on the
o undergraduate level
Q graduate level
Roosevelt University admits students on the basis of individual merit
without regard to race, color, creed, sex or physical handicap.

Name
Address

Cityv

7ir,_

vuy OtOM L1p

,I J

No CIVIUANBA ND
CAN MAKE You THIS OFFER.

If you're a musician who's serious
about performing, you should take a
serious look at the Army.
Army bands offer you an average
of 40 performances a month. In every-
thing from concerts to parades.
Army bands also offer you a"
chance to travel.

The Army has bands performing
in Japan, Hawaii, Europe and all
across America.
And Army bands offer you the

It's a genuine, right-now, imme-
diate opportunity.
Compare it to your civilian offers.
Then write: Army Opportunities, P.O.

chance to play with good musicians. Just Box 7715, Clifton, NJ 07015.
to qualify, you have to be able to sight-
read music you've never seen before and
demonstrate several other musical skills. BE ALLYOU CAN BE.

1r

fr

0-

0/~lGh nfit

r

I~e61 //4<, IJI

1 C

f

o ~eV

I1 f

BASEBALL CHALLENGE

L

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan