100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 29, 1985 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-03-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

De r
to challenge
aRepubfirmn
"
(Continued from Page 1)
the city's homeless, and the expansion
Of the city's voter registration system.
Hadler, on the other hand, is a retired
executive of Hoover-Universal, Inc.,
and follows a relatively conservative
line. He is opposed to comparable wor-
b, which he said would be a
"bureaucratic nightmare"; he suppor-
ts only limited aid for the city's
homeless, preferring to let religious
and philanthropic organizations handle
the issue; he said he wants to keep a lid
on the number of deputy voter
registrars, saying that "...if you care
enough about voting, you ought to be
willing to go a few blocks and register
in the city clerk's office."
" The candidates also differ in style.
Pierce revels in vigorous campaigning,
while Hadler seems to be ready for the
intensity of the campaign to subside.
Pierce and Hadler conflict sharply on
the issue of the city's responsibility to
the students. Pierce said students
should take an interest in politics
because they "rely on the same ser-
Vices that other people do."
Hadler, however, said that students
.are a transient community and there-
ore shouldn't influence the way the city
is run.
"It's legal for §tudents to register and
vote, obviously, but I don't think it's
morally and ethically proper for an un-
dergraduate student who is going to be
here one year or two years to be voting
in something that could set the politcial
and economic agenda for some years to
come," he said.
-
,FHAPPL

The Michigan Daily- Friday, March 29, 1985- Page 3
Local court charges MSU student

Freshman accused in

By THOMAS HRACH
A 17-year-old Michigan State Univer-
sity freshman faces assault charges for
an incident that reportedly started as a
dispute among friends and developed
into a near-fatal stabbing in Ann Arbor
last week.
Rajiv Thomas, a student from India
who attended high school in Far-
mington Hills, was arraigned in 15th
District Court this week for "assault
with intent to commit great bodily
harm."
THOMAS HAS BEEN ordered to ap-
pear in court for a preliminary exam
April 10 on charges that he stabbed Ann
Arbor resident Brian Forsythe last
week during an argument at Forsythe's

apartment at 400 Maynard St.
Forsythe was admitted to University
Hospitals Friday evening with stab
wounds in the back and chest.
Forsythe's roommate, LSA
sophomore Sean Cummins, who was
present during the fight, said he, For-
sythe, and Thomas had been friends
since they attended Harrison High
School in Farmington Hills. He said the
relationship turned sour when Thomas
came to visit the two in Ann Arbor while
he was on spring break.
THOMAS AND FORSYTHE were for
some reason "just not getting along"
during the entire time Thomas was in
the apartment, said Cummins.
Forsythe and Thomas came to blows

stabbing near
when Forsythe physically threw the back a
Thomas out of the apartment, accor- a student
ding to Cummins. But Thomas - who working at
had a key - came in after Forsythe and The Att(
in the struggle Thomas pulled a knife Apol, sai
and inflicted the wounds, said Cum- hearing th
mins. merits a c
"We knew he had a bad temper, but not rulec
usually he was pretty quiet," said charges w
Cummins.
ANN ARBOR POLICE arrested "It seem
Thomas at Main and Huron shortly af- kids that id.
ter the incident as he was apparently Ariol sai
trying to catch a bus out of town. crim, this
Forsythe, now in Farmington Hills serious to s
with his parents, said he was released Thomas
from the hospital on Monday and is in posting be
good condition with several stitches in this week
com ment

campus
nd chest. Forsythe, who is not
, was living in town and
I Domino's Pizza.
orney for the defendant, John
d that at the preliminary
e judge will decide if the case
circuit court trial, but he did
out the possibility that the
ould be reduced or dropped.
ns to be a tiff between some
went to high school.together,
"Compared to the annals of
s is small potatoes. But it is
the people involved."
,who was released after
nd, is back in East Lansing
attending class but would not
about the affair.

Pierce
... espouses liberalism

French artist Marc
Chagall dies at 97

Hadler
... opposes student input

Highlight

NINGS-

ST. PAUL DE VENICE, France (AP)
- Marc Chagall, whose dreamlike and
vividly colored paintings established
him as one of the 20th century's leading
artists, died at his home in this French
Riviera village last night, his wife said.
He was 97.
His wife said he collapsed and died
almost immediately. The exact cause
of death was not immediately-known.
The son of a Russian shopkeeper,
Chagall portrayed in his paintings a
rainbow-hued vision based on dreams,
childhood memories and religious
mysticism. His works never fit into any
formal art movement, and he persisted
through them all with a fascination for
such images as cows soaring through
the air, lovers riding horses in the sky,
and fiddlers on roofs.
In addition to paintings, Chagall did
stained glass windows for the cathedral
in Metz, France; the Hadassah Medical
Center in Jerusalem and the United
Nations.
His pictures were filled with entran-
ced people, animals and Jewish and
Christian symbols floating through
space in defiance of both gravity and
perspective.
They were painted in bright reds,
greens and blues that made his con-
temporary, Pablo Picasso, describe
him as "the last painter left who under-
stands what color really is."
"I want to introduce into my pictures
a psychic shock... a fourth dimension,"
he once said. "Therefore, let people
cease talking about fairy tales, of the
fantastic, of Chagall the flying painter,
when they speak of me."
"I don't understand Chagall at all,"
he told an interviewer shortly befofe his
90th birthday. "All I know is that one
understands only what one loves."
Chagall spent his early life in the

OUR SAUCY SHIP'SA BEAUTY!
The University of Michigan Gilbert and Sullivan Society
presents

4

ghetto town of Vitebsk, Russia, where
he was born July 7, 1887. Vitebsk
showed up in his painting in the form of
icons and symbols of his Jewish up-
bringing.
Chagall was remembered by
American experts yesterday as one of
the giants of 20th century art, but one
whose best Work was decades behind
him.
He hasn't been an issue in the art
world since the first World War," said
William Rubin, curator of the Museum
of Modern Art in New York, who
nonetheless rated him as "the last of
the 20th century giants."
"I have a great admiration for the
work he did in the 1920s," French ab-
stract expressionist Jean Miotte said in
Miami. "I really believe he was in the
vanguard at the beginning of this cen-
tury. He was one of the masters, like
Picasso, like Matisse, one might even
say he was one of the boldest artists of
that period."
Correction
Current University sophomores will
be accepted into the Medical
Technology program this year and
allowed to complete the program's
requireients regardless of the up-
coming decision on whether to
eliminate the program. The Daily in-
correctly reported Tuesday that
sophomores would not be admitted if
the program is cut.

April4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 8:00p.m.
April 6, 13, 2:00 p.m.
April 7, 3:00 p.m.

Or
the Lass That Loved A Sailor
Special Holiday Preview
Wednesday, April 3, 8 p.m.

The United Mime Workers will perform their mime composition
"Shadows Beyond the Benefit of a Doubt," in the Schorling Auditorium in
the School of Education Building tonight at 8. Tickets are $5, and all proceeds
go to the San Vincente Cooperative, a bee-keeping operation in the war-torn
province of San Vincente, El Salvador.
Films
AGAPE - Heavenly Deception, 6:30 p.m., South Quad Afro Lounge.
C2 - La Strada, 7 p.m.; L'Avventura, 9 p.m., Aud. A, Angell; Last Tango
in Paris, 7 & 9 p.m., Nat. Sci. Auditorium.
GI - Totally Neglected Girl, 7:30 p.m., Max Kade Haus, 603 Oxford.
Michigan Media - 2nd Annual Michigan Media National Student Video
Festival, 8 p.m., Michigan Theater.
MED - The World According to Garp, 7:15 & 9:30 p.m., MLB 3.
AAFC - Ziggy Stardust, 7, 8:30 & 10:20 p.m., MLB 4.
Performances
Hellenic University Society - Four one-act plays, in Greek, 7 p.m., Ander-
son Room, Union.
Ark - Richard Thompson and Band, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., 637 S. Main Street.
Brecht Company - Don Juan, 8 p.m., Residential College Auditorium,
East Quad.
Performance Network - Elise Bryant, 8 p.m., 408 W. Washington.
School of Music - Women's Glee Club, 8 p.m., Rackham; New World
String Quartet, 8 p.m., Recital Hall, School of Music; Dance Recital, Sherry
Kahn, Laurie Roman, Helayne Schiff, 8 p.m., Studio A, Dance Building;
Falstaff, 8p.m., Power Center.
University Music Society - Sherrill Milnes, 8:30 p.m., Hill Auditorium.
UAC.- Comedy Company, 8 p.m., Mendelssohn Theater, Michigan
League.
Speakers.
Graduate School of Business Administration - Harlan Crowder,
"Relational Planning Models," 2 p.m., room 76, Business Administration
Building._
Economics/Sociology-Raymond Lotta, "The Breakdown of Pax Americana
and the onrush of WWII: A Marxist Analysis," 4 p.m., room 126, East
Quad.
Astronomy - Beverly Berger, "Cosmic Beginning," 8:30 p.m., Aud. B,
Angell..
Guild House - Barbara Fuller, "Women and Peacemaking," noon, 802
Monroe Street.
School of Natural Resources-Tom . Woiwode, "Land Conservation
Through Private Action," 3 p.m., room 1040, Dana Building.
South and Southeast Asian Studies - Dick Salisbury, "First Sagarmanthy
Preservation Expedition: Cleaning Up Mount Everest," noon, Lane Hall
Commons.
Meetings
Chinese Students Christian Fellowship - 7:30 p.m., Memorial Christian
Church, corner of Hill and Tappan Streets.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Study - 7:30 p.m., basement, University Refor-
med Church, 1001 E. Huron Road.
Korean Christian Fellowship -9p.m., Campus Chapel.
Union Cgunceling Services - Dissertation support group, 8:30 a.m., room
3100, Union Counceling Services.
International Students Fellowship - 7 p.m., call 994-4669 for ride.
Miscellaneous
National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Clubs
- Vocal Arts competition, 7 p.m., Beth el, A.M.E. Church.
Museum of Art - "Earth Magicians: Pottery from the Collections of the
University of Michigan," beginning today, through June 16.
Bridge Club - 7:30 p.m., Michigan League.
ACLU - Forum, David Hollister, Robert Green, Elias Baumgarten, "The
Dying Patient's Right to Refuse Treatment: Legal, Medical, Philosophical
Views," 8p.m., Unitarian Church, 1917 Washtenaw Avenue.
Delta Sigma Pi - Dance party to benefit The United Way, 9 p.m.,
Ballroom Union.
Women's Tennis - Michigan vs Miami of Ohio, 7:30 p.m., Huron Valley
Tennis Club.
Chicanos at Michigan/Puerto Rican Students Association/Hispanic Law
Students Association - 3rd Annual Latino Cultural Night, 7:30 p.m.,

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Michigan League Building
(313) 761-7835

Good seats still available the first week
H.M.S. PINAFORE is the original, nautical comic opera, her decks awash with spirited
hompipes, jigs, and shanties. Written over 100 years ago, this breezy comedy about
two "star-crossed lovers" remains just as brilliantly relevant as it was in 1878. Her sails
billowing with beautiful costumes, scenery, and music, H.M.S. PINAFORE is a
delightful voyage for sailors and shipmates of all ages.

1I(Ac IPamt'~

...
! , _

The University of Michigan
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
Michigan League Building
911 North University
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

(313) 761-7855

FEVER FEVER FEVER FEVER FEVER
SP R IN G FEVER FEVER FEVER FEVER FEVER
ALBUMS ai ASTE SL

I

A CHOOSE FROM CLASSIC TITLES
ALL 5.98 MFG. LIST BY ALL-TIME FAVORITE ARTISTS
ALBUMS and CASSETTES LIKE,..B RUCE SPRINGSTEEN B CHICAGO
PINK FLOYD " BOB JAMES
" SIMON & GARFUNKEL " BILLY JOEL
Look for the "A" Code " THE CLASH AND MANY MORE0 0
-PAUL McCARTNEY
Stickers - -. ELVIS COSTELLO
A CHOOSE FROM CLASSIC TITLES
ALL 6.98 MFG. LIST BY ALL-TIME FAVORITE ARTISTS aflY -
ALBUMS and CASSETTES LIKE ... : PHIL COLLINS " THE PRETENDERS
" FOREIGNER : ARETHA FRANKLIN
Look for the "B" Code " EAGLES " DAVID SANBORN
L STEVIE NICKS . JEAN LUC PONTY - V
Stickers... THECARS E AND MANY MORE!
MOST 8.98 MFG. LIST ° MOST CURRENT HIT TITLES LIKE...
. JOHN FOGERTY "Centerfield"
ALBUMS and CASSETTES DON HENLEY "Building the Perfect Beast" your A 9 9
DEBARGE "Rhythm of the Night"
Look for the "C" Code " SOUNDTRACK "Beverly Hills Cop" EACH
" ERIC CLAPTON "Behind the Sun"
Stickers .. CHAKA KHAN "I Feel For You"
r rL " ;Ig! - I .. I [

Chagall
... dies in France

* ?et1I~I~8 ~eening~s,
*~~~ Cenle~ ters o
n e'1
" p~mn
wekns T N iiourailiies
. comlete TES " -and ddiated,

E > It -

* BEST BUYS on BLANK TAPES

0@0

TDK
SA-90 MINUTE
BLANK CASSETTES
2-PACK
only 5 00,

MAXELL
UDS IorI11
BLANK CASSETTES
2-PACK.
90 Minutes Each Tape
00
PER 2 PACK

TDK
AD-90 MINUTE
BLANK CASSETTES
2-PACK
oy 4 PER2-PACK

AVAILABLE!
MAXELL
XL or I
BLANK CASSETTES
2-PACK
90 Minutes Each Tape
o S0C
only PER 2-PACK

i

om

BLANK TPE SALE ENDS WEDN]ESDAYIAPIL 39 1985II

I-.- . - STATE.-CO7U.mN

STATE COUPON
20% OFF :Ii

STATE COUPON

T

STATE COUPON

Tl

AI RIDTfl

50%oFFI

I

r tUUC:AlIUNAL

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan