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March 19, 1985 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-03-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Conflicting testimony
complicates trial

I

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, March 19, 1985 - Page 3
City Council splits
in divestment vote

(Continued from Page 1)
something else, and put in the
refrigerator.
After the prosecution, defense, and
hearing council investigated the room
where the fire took place, Alan Silber,
Picozzi's lawyer called Peter Vallis, an
expert in fire investigation from New
York to the stand to testify on the
defendant's behalf.
VALLIS said that if Picozzi had set
the fire, he would have been burned
more severely.
"I have not seen in 23 years where an
arsonist didn't get burned in the front."
he said. Using the same photographs as
evidence, Vallis said that the gasoline
left marks that "show all the signs of
splash effect," and it was not carefully
poured there.
Vallis attempted to discredit
Monroe's testimony that the outside
burns on the door were caused by the
ignition of vapor seeping out the vents
on the door.
"IF VAPOR aspirated into the
hallway, it would not have done this.

This had to be done by droplets out-
side." Vallis also said that if the fire
was indeed set from within the room,
"the remains of the gas container
would be there."
Based on tests he conducted in his
laboratory, Vallis said there was not
enough time for Picozzi to completely
rinse out gasoline from a container in
the short time that Monroe said elapsed
from its distribution.
After the hearing adjourned, Silber
said, he thought testimony went well.
"Today we had the unveiling of the
fireball. In order for the University of
Michigan to win, you must believe the
fireball theory."
UNIVERSITY attorney Peter Davis
was also confident about the testimony
and was looking forward to "my cross
examination of the so-called expert
(Vallis)".
More witnesses will be called today
and Wednesday, before oral sum-
mations Wednesday afternoon. A
decision is five or six weeks away.

(Continued from Page 1)
documentation which suggests that tax-
payers may lose out on investment
returns if they withdraw stocks in South
Africa businesses. He suggested that
they city council might play a larger
role in changing policy in the nation
which practices apartheid if com-
munity leaders sat on the board of
directors of the controversial firms.
But Councilman Lowell Peterson (D-
first ward), answered that the purpose
behind divestment "is to kick the props
out from under the companies."
And Hunter added that there are 20
states with plans to divest, and that
other cities, and even Michigan State
University, fully divested without
losing any money from investment
returns.

Some council members said that
some of the firms in which the city's
pension money is invested abide by the-
Sullivan Principles, a set of rules for
equal treatment of black employees in
white-controlled firms.
But Hunter said the Sullivan Prin
ciple only gets at solving part of the
apartheid problem.
"Even if a man works for a company
that abides by the Sullivan agreement
he still needs a pass to return home at
night, and is not allowed to vote," he
said.
In other action, the council passed a
resolution which asks the city ad-
ministrator to study alternative ways of
impounding vehicles for unpaid
parking tickets instead of towing.

HAPPENINGS
Highlight
In continuation of Central America Week, the Puerto Rican Solidarity
Committee will sponsor a lecture by Hector Delgrado, "Militarism in Cen-
tral America: the Puerto Rican Connection." It will begin at 7:30 p.m., in the
West Conference Room of Rackham Building.
Performances
Ark - New Talent Night, Nancy Whie, two for one admission, 8 p.m., 637
South Main Street.
School. of Music - Piano Recital, Victor Galino, 8 p.m., Recital Hall..
Speakers
Biophysics - E. Margoliash, "Evolutionary Changes in Protein Structures
and Biological Function - Which Drives Which?" 4 p.m., South Lecture
Hall, Medical Science Buuilding II.
B'nai B'rith - 6th Annual Conference on the Holocaust, Emil
Fackenheim, "Authentic and Unauthentic Responses to the Holocaust," 7:30
p.m., 1429 Hill Street.
Chinese Studies - Zhao Shidong, "The Landscape of China," noon, Lane
Hall Commons Room.
Computing Center - Chalk Talk, "File Manipulation with *COMBINE,"
12:10 p.m., Room 1011 NUBS; Forest Hartman, "Intro to Sigfiles & Init-
files," 3:30 p.m., Room 171 Business Administration Building.
Eclipse Jazz- "arwulf arwulf," jazz literature, 7:30 p.m., Crowfoot
Room, Union.
Human Growth & Development - John Bowlby, "The Role of Childhood
Experience in Cognitive Disturbance," 7:30 p.m., Mendelssohn Theater.
LSA - Sidney Fine, "Chance & History: Some Aspects of the Detroit Riot
of 1967," 4 p.m., Rackham Lecture Hall.
Psychology - Sidney Blatt, "Changes in Cognition, Object Represen-
tation, & Behavior in the Intensive Treatment of Seriously Disturbed
Adolescents & Young Adults," 8p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
Russian & East European Studies, LSA - Gordon Kane. "National
Technical Means of Inspection," 8p.m., Room 2003, Lane Hall
American Statistical Association - Stuart Hunter, "The Role of Modern
Statistics on Behalf of Industrial Quality," 8 p.m., Room 1310, Kresge
Business Administrastion Library Building.
Meetings
University Alanon - noon. Room 3200 Union.
Ann Arbor Go Club - 7 p.m., Room 1433 Mason Hall.
Michigan Student Asssembly - 7:30 p.m., Assembly Chambers, Room
3909, Union.
AIESEC - International Business Management Club, 5:15 p.m., Room
131, Business Administration Building.
Armenian Students' Cultural Association -7 p.m., Union.
International Center, organize trip to Europe, 3:30 p.m., International
Center, 603 East Madison.
Center for Eating Disorders - Support Groups, 7:30 p.m., Human Growth
Center, Suite 13, 2002 Hogback.
Miscellaneous
His House Christian Fellowship - Bible Study, 7:30 p.m., 925 East Ann
Street.
Program in American Institutions - Workshop, 3 p.m., Pond Room A & B,
Union.
Chemistry - Seminar, G. W. Flynn, "Infrared Diode Laser Probes of
Dynamic Processes in Molecules," 4 p.m., Room 1300, Chemistry Building.
Cultural Arts - Botticelli game players, 12:15, Conference Room, League.
Chemical Engineering - Seminar, Gregory Zeikus, "Regulation of
Cellular Electrochemistry," 11:30a.m., Room 1013, Dow Building.
English Literature & Language - Poetry Reading, Garrett Hongo, 4 p.m.,
West Conference Room, Rackham Building.
Museum of Art - Art Break, Sir Peter Lely, "The Letter," 12:10 p.m.,
Museum of Art.
Oral Biology & Dental Research Institute - Seminar, Bo Krasse, "Iden-
tification & Treatment of S Mutans Infected Individuals, 4 p.m., Room 1033
Kellogg Building.
Psychiatric Gerontology, Neurology - Seminar, Stanley Prusiner,
"Cerebral Amyloid, Scrapie, Prions & Alzheimers Disease," 3:45 p.m., Men-
tal Health Research Institute.
SODC - Workshop, "United We Stand, Divided We Fall (Apart): Conflict
Management," 6:30 p.m., Union.
Urban Technological & Environmental Planning - Seminar, Jeffrey Kiker,
"UM/ITI Design Engineering for Quality Program," 8:30 a.m., Room 214
Carver Building, 506 East Liberty.
Medical School, Computer Advisory Committee - Symposium, "Seeing is
Believing: An Introduction to Image Processing at The University of
Michigan Medical Center," 8:30 a.m., Sheldon Auditorium, Towsley Center
for Continuing Medical Education.
Biology - Seminar, Wayne Frasch, "Structure and Electron Transfer in
Photosystem II," noon, Room 1139, Nat. Sci.
Social Work - "Working With Minority Families," noon, Room S9410, UM
Hospital.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109

$1.50 TUES. ALL DAY EXCEPT "FIELDS"

Pullove tulk YAssociated ress
Pull over turkey
Turkeys blocked a Texas interstate after the trailer that was carrying them
to a slaughterhouse jackknifed yesterday. The driver of the truck was not in-
jured but 150 turkeys died.
PSNprotests Shap iro

The University of Michigan
GOSPEL CHOIR
Presents their First
GOSPEL EXTRAVAGANZA
Saturday, March 23
PROGRAM SCHEDULE

(Continued from Page 1)
classified research matters, said mem-
ber Andrea Walsh.
The students said they want more
than just a discussion with Shapiro.
They would like him to attend "so there
can be a public recognition of what the
Uni ersity says and does" on classified
research matters, said PSN member
Andrea Walsh, an LSA junior.
ONE TOPIC the forum will consider
is if the University's guidelines for
classified research, which prohibit
research with the capacity to injure or
destroy human life, are effective.
Ingrid Kock, a junior LSA student,
said Shapiro has been a "big influence"
on the University's classified research
policies. Kock, who served a 12-day jail
sentence along with fellow PSN mem-
ber Nancy Aronoff for a sit-in last Mar-
ch at a campus laboratory, said Shapiro
"approved a Sussman decision to ap-
prove anti-submarine warfare
project."
Shapiro later said, "I do not partic-
pate in the process unless someone con-
sults (me)." He added that Sussman
POLICE
NOTES
Four thefts in campus
area
Jewelery worth $8,000 was found
missing from an apartment on the 2000
block of Stone Drive in the Northwood
Apartments Sunday evening. A bike
worth $110 was stolen from the music
school parking lot early yesterday
morning after its lock had been cut. A
burglar walked through an unlocked
door on the 1300 block of Olivia early
Saturday and left with $75 in cash. And
a door was forced open on the 300 block-
of South Division. A stereo and two
jackets, valued at less than $450, were
taken from the apartment early Satur-
day morning.
Con men strike
Ann Arbor police are investigating a
case involving two or more men imper-
sonating Ann Arbor police detectives.
An 81-year-old Ann Arbor woman
reported that she gave the con men
$7,000 in jewelry. According to Detec-
tive Norm Olmstead, the men struck
again Sunday evening at the home of a
31-year-old woman on Cook street, but
they were unsuccessful.
- Thomas Hrach

has the final say in the process, as
outlined by the regents.
Sussman discussed the possibility of
accepting the submarine contract,
Shapiro said, but "that's because he
chose to do it."
The panel will be moderated by Ann
Coleman, a campus minister. Other
panelists will be Aronoff, who is a
member of the Classified Review
Panel, Daniel Axelrod, a physics
professor, and Sussman.
Corrections
A story and editorial appearing in the
Daily last week incorrectly said that
several city council candidates did not
make an appearance at a forum spon-
sored by the Michigan Gay Un-
dergraduates.
Several candidates did make an ap-
pearance later in the evening.

W ORKSHOPS:
VOCATION:
MASiS REUFARSAI :
MUSI'AI :
V OCATIO)N:

TOPICS
"Spiritual Aspects of Being a Choir Member" - 10:00 a.m.
"Choir Decorum" - 11:00a.m.
MODERN I ANGUA1F BI DG. (Auditorium 3)
N ill Include Various Choirs and Groups - 3:00 - 5:00 p.m.
NTODERN I ANGUAGF B131DG.
Featuring the Mass Choir: Cass Technical High School
Gospel Choir, Derricks Roberts Fnsemnble of Toledo, Ohio,
Martn I uther King Singers AND MORF!
SFCOND BAPTIST CHURCH OF ANN ARBOR
(850 Red Oak St.) 8:00 p.m.

P( ORD l 3i : (Itice of the V.1. or Stideni Scr icce. ( on unityernices and
I rotter Iowse. I thics and Religion, A caden ic A [lairs, J 1olsinW
(Special Pro rin "). ( I[lice o Adc issions. N S A

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