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March 19, 1985 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-03-19

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Ninety-five Years
of
Editorial Freedom

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Rays
Sunny with increasing
cloudiness. Highs in the upper
40s.

Vol. XCV, No. 132 Copyright 1985, The Michigan Daily Ann Arbor, Michigan - Tuesday, March 19, 1985 Fifteen Cents Eight Pages
City counIcil
splits over
divestment
Eto the fact that some black leaders don't
Ewant divestment?"
After an hour-long, emotional debate, IN REPLY, Councilman Jeff Epton,
Ann Arbor City Council last night cast (D-Third Ward), said "It is illegal for
a tie vote on whether the city should anyone (from South Africa) to advocate
divest its pension fund investments divestment, and safely return to South
from firms that do business in South Africa if they do this."
Africa.-Lizwi Mhlane, a gradute student at
The resolution, which called for a the University from South Africa who
committee to oversee the divestment of attended the meeting, simply nodded
the pension fund investments, drew a 5- his head in agreement.
5 vote. Mayor Louis Belcher was absent Epton voted for the measure.
and therefore unable to cast a tie- Councilman Gerald Jernigans (R
breaking vote. Fourth Ward), acting as mayor pro-
COUNCILMAN Larry Hunter, (D- tem, voted against the measure as well.
First Ward), who proposed the He raised objections to Hunter's plan;
resolution, said he would reintroduce "It's a resolution without documents,
Daily Photo by DAN HABIB the measure after the April elections. divestiture means what? There are no
Bleak and Blue "I'm totally dedicated to the issue," alternative plans to action, it's divest or
he said after the vote. nthing."
Despondent Wolverines (from left to right) Antoine Joubert, Rich Relford and coach Bill Frieder reflect on their early exit from the NCAA tournament Councilwoman Jeannette Middleton, HE ADDED that there is some
at the hands of Villanova. See story page 8. (R-Third Ward), voted down the See CITY, Page 3
proposal, asking "How do you answer
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By SEAN JACKSON Linguistics instructors would spend only one- will remain intact. kind of excellence we're aiming for," said John
A special committee of LSA faculty members half or one-quarter of their time in the A set of undergraduate core courses in Catford, acting chairman of the department;
Linguistics be downsized into a program, and The report clearly states that appointments phonetics, grammar, linguistic typology, recommendations for the epartment's
" that linguistics courses be more closely in- may be offered to instructors currently outside history of linguistics, and other basic courses, reorganization.
tegrated into other language-oriented depar- the department, and that "there is a presum- In addition, students would be offered cour- The committee's report is the final result of
tments ption that no priority will be given to present ses cross-listed with other departments and un- almost four years of reviews of the depar
Linguistics professors will meet this week to linguistics department faculty." its such as Anthropology 272 (Language and tment. After three linguistics professors
discuss the committee's report, which calls for Under the proposed plan, the reorganized Culture), Electrical Engineering and Com- retired and were not replaced because of
reducing the number of full-time teaching program would also feature a rotating position puter Science 595 (Theory of Natural Language dergone review both by a group of linguistics
positions in the department from 11.5 to six or for a distinguished linguist who would teach for and Structure), and Psychology 447 experts not associated with the University ani
TevRe UT. oudb ygvn one rTER twgom wol ters.C omt asmso rsate d th theniverstan
THseven. one or two terms (Psychology of Language). by a second panel of LSA faculty.
D e p-r t. c u tsTHREUTO wolbemdbygvn THE MASTERS program would be Committee members and LSA Dean Peter
professors part-time appointments in other eliminated under the reor anization but the "THIS (reorganization) seems to be a good Steiner say the down-sizing is necessary not only
language-related departments in LSA. undergraduate and doctora degree programs way of stimulating things and developing the See LINGUISTICS, Page 2
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Experts

offer conflicting

PSN holds
a sit-in at

views on Picozzi case

By NANCY DRISCOLL
Two arson experts, testifying at the
hearing of former University law
student James Picozzi, who stands ac-
cused of setting his law quad room on
fire, gave differing views yesterday on
the cause of the blaze.
Marvin Monroe, a senior captain in
the arson section of the Detroit Fire
Department, testified for the Univer-
sity, saying that Picozzi had to have set
the March 8, 1983 fire himself. Picozzi
suffered burns over 10 percent of his
body and a broken back as a result of
the blaze.
USING ENLARGED photographs of
the scene of the fire, the charred book-
case, and door from the dorm room,
Monroe explained the prosecution's
theory that when the fire was ignited, a
"4000 degree fireball" was created that
swept through the room and out the
open window in a matter of seconds.
"There was not a very severe fire af-

'I have not seen in 23 years where an ar-
sonist didn't get burned in the front'
- Defense witness
Peter Vallis

Shapiro

5S

ter the fireball exited the room,."
Monroe said.
According to Monroe, the fire was
caused by about 12 ounces of gasoline
that had been poured in the corner of
the room, between the door and the
bookcase, and trailed across the front
of the door. He claimed the defendant
lit the trail of gasoline on fire with a
Cricket lighter that was shown in
photographs lying on a shelf above the

sink.
"IF SOMEONE was to light this from
the hallway, they would have poured.
the trailer of gasoline to the hallway."
Monroe also said that although the
container that held the gasoline hadn't
been found, "it could have been
deliberately camoflouged". He said it
may have been rinsed out, filled with
See CONFLICTING, Page 3

Office
By SEAN JACKSON
Claiming that University President
Harold Shapiro reneged on a promise to
attend a forum on classified research,
15 Progressive Student Network
students held an hour long sit-in at his
office yesterday.
The group read a statement to the
president emphasizing their
displeasure with his refusal to attend
the forum, set for March 25. All 15
members spoke with Shapiro on the
issue.
SHAPIRO cannot attend becuase of a
busy schedule and said one University
official would suffice.
Alfred Sussman, the vice-president
for research, was "perfectly adequate
to represent the University on the issue,"
he said.
Shapiro said he sat down with PSN
members last week to set a date for the
forum, but he could not commit himself
to attending.
He did not rule out the possibility of
attending the panel discussions, but
said it depended on his calendar.
THE PROTESTORS, however, wan-
ted Shapiro to attend the forum in order
to participate in dialogue with students.
The students want more than a
discussion with Shapiro to result from
the forum. They want Shapiro to attend
"so there can be public recognition of
what the University says, and does," on
See PSA, Page 3

Turner imitator rocks for MS

By JANICE PLOTNIK
One day Karen Berman blow dried her hair into a style that
her friends said resembled rock star Tina Turner's.
She never thought those remarks would lead her to enter
and win the M Against MS Rock-a-Like contest as Tina Turner
this past weekend.
SHE WAS later approached during happy hour at the
University Club Bar by one of the contest's organizers to im-
personate a rock singer. Her first thoughts were of her frien-
ds's comments, so she said "yes" and chose to pose as Tur-
ner.
Though Berman has long been in the spotlight, having held
a lead role in last semester's Musket-production of Grease,
the Rock-a-Like contest was an entirely different form of ac-
I TODAY
Wind powered tricycle
MAY SEEM like a kid's diversion, but John Archibald
is no kid and he's hard at work with plans to build a
l.,,i,,ln A nkaihn11 a QA . nlar - vn m, hnnii1

ting.
You never would have known it when the stage lights dim-
med in the Union's Ballroom Thursday night and the 5'1"
LSA sophomore stood with her back to the crowd, waiting for
the music to start.
DRESSED IN a sequined tank top, black leather mini-
skirt, long black gloves, and fish net stockings, she belted
out her rendition of.Turner's "What's Love Got To Do With
It."
Berman was one of two contestants who actually sang the
songs of the stars they impersonated. The other 14 par-
ticipants lip-synced.
The student-dominated crowd clapped to the beat and
See BERMAN, Page 2

Daily Photo by ALISA BLOCK

PSN members, from left to right, Andrea Walsh, Mark Weinstein, Marian
Delgado, and Ingrid Cock, leave President Harold Shapiro's office yesterday
after staging an hour-long sit-in to protest Shapiro's refusal to attend the
groups forum on campus research March 25.

local businesses in return for advertising- that would be
placed on the propeller vane or tail. Archibald even thinks
the bike itself has commercial potential. "This will sell it-
self," he said. "It may appear to be a little oddball, but it's
a sport."
Legislative scale
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see the governor come down any day." For 25 cents, the
machine displays a person's weight, how many pounds they
must either shed or gain, the number of calories they should
be taking in and how many days it will take to reach ideal
body weight, taking into account the subject's gender, build
and height.
Green and red wedding

light district known as the Block. McMahon, 40, is a barten-
der at the club and his 32-year-old wife, a go-go dancer for
16 years, has been appearing at a downtown lounge. "I'm
happy that he got married - it's abokit time!" said Ruth Mc
Mahon, the groom's mother. "I would have preferred it if it
had taken place in a church. But he had to make his point."

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