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March 17, 1985 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

V

,HAPPEN
Sunday
Highlight
Ann Arbor's own comedy theater troupe, the
forming a dinner theater in the U-Club of the
Italian dinner begins at 5:30 p.m., with the show b
Films
d
d
Mediatrics - The Return of the Pink Panther
ther Strikes Again, 9:30 p.m., MLB 4.
AAFC - Shivers, 7 & 9:45 p.m., Aud. B, Angell
Hill St. - David, 7 & 9 p.m., Hill Street Cinema
Michigan - Ann Arbor 16MM Film Festival
Theater.
Alt Act - Carry Greenham Home, 7 p.m., Nat
Theta Chi - Fraternity - Tommy, 8 & 10 p.m.,
Pilot Program - Streamers, 7 p.m. Blue Louni
Performing
School of Music - Recitals, trombone, John
Charles Tomlinson, 4 p.m., Trombone, Scott McE
8 p.m., Recital Hall; Javanese Gamelam, Judit
Auditorium; University Campus Band, B. Bech'
p.m., Hill Auditorium; University Dance Compa
Clair, conductor, Madcat Ruth, harmonica & s3
dancer, Jeffrey Solow, cellist, 2 p.m., Power Cen
Performance Network -Four By Beck
Washington.
PTP -Hot'l Baltimore, 2 p.m., Trueblood The
Turkish Students Asociation - Saim Akeil
duo recital, 3p.m., Ballroom, Union.
Kerrytown Concert House - Piano recital, A:
North Fourth Avenue.
Latin America Culture Project - Benefit cor
people of Central America, 8 p.m., Schorli
Education Building.
Speakers
Conference on the Holocaust -Sidra Ezrachi,
Literature," 3p.m., 1429 Hill Street.
Meetings
Juggling Club - 5:30p.m., Anderson Room, U
Miscellaneous
His House Christian Fellowship - Dinner, 6:
925 East Ann Street.
Ark - Rape Prevention Benefit,8 p.m., 637 So
Lutheran Campus Ministry - worship, 10:30 a
slide presentation on Korea, 7 p.m., Lord of Lig
Forest street.
UAC - Michigras Fashion Show, noon, Pendli
Monday
Highlight
B'nai B'rith will be sponsoring the 6th
Holocaust, with a lecture by Alex Zehrmann,
7:30 p.m. It will begin at 7:30 p.m., at 1429 Hill st
Films
AAFC -Lolita, 9p.m. MLB
Japanese Studies- The Bri Talks in Her SI
His Sleep, 7 p.m., Aud. B, Angell Hall.
Performances
School of Music - piano recital, 8p.m., recit
Speakers
English Language & Literature, Rackham
LS&A Enrichment Fund - Beckett at 80, Mar
West Conference Room.
Faculty Women's Club - Elizabeth Douvan,
Family," 11:30 p.m., Michigan Room, League.
Near East & North African Studies - Ric

tlements: Time Is Running Out." noon. Lane Hi
Urban Planning Alumni Society - Candice
and Master Planning," 7:30 p.m., Room 3105 Ar
Chinese Studies - Shigeru Ishikawa, "A r
perience of China," 8p.m., Rackham Amphithe
Classical Studies - Keith Hopkins, "The
Western Culture," 4 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Computing Center - Forrest Hartmann, "In
sions & Macres, Part I," Room 165, Business A(
Michigan Botanical Club - Daniel Rickter,
Forests & Water," 7:45 p.m., Mattaei Botar
Road.
Anthropology, Japanese Studies - Dorinn(
Work: Women in Small-Scale Enterprise in
Commons.
Meetings
Asian American Association -6 p.m., Trotte
Christian Science Organization - 7:30 p.m., L
Reader's Theater - 8:30 p.m., Room 2013, An
Rackham Student Government -5:30 p.m., V
Miscellaneous
Gerentology, Geriatric Medicine, Cente
Development - Seminar, Lesi Verbrugge &
People Treat Their Symptoms," 1:30 p.m., Ro
Guild House - Reading, Daysie Detsch & F
Monroe Street.
Chemistry - Seminar, Richard Lindvedt, "b
tricity & Reactivity in Polynuclear comp
., Chemistry Building.

I

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. Sci.
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:0 p.
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ght,
teton I

NGS-
iedy Club, will be per-
n. The all-you-can-eat
ning at 7:30 p.m.
0 p.m.; The Pink Pan-
9 & 11 p.m., Michigan
. A, Angell Hall.
lice Lloyd.
n, 2 p.m.; double bass,
y, 6 p.m.; horn students,
cker, 8 p.m., Rackham
R. Pento, conductors, 4
Philharmonica, Gael St.
esizers, Peter Sparling,
6:30 p.m., 408 West
il Ulgen, violin & piano
w Anderson, 4 p.m., 415
for medical aid for the
Auditorium, School of
ages of the Holocaust in
im., Bible Study, 7 p.m.,
Main Street.
student supper, 6 p.m.;
corner of Hill street and
Room, Union.
ual Conference on the
ldren of the Holocaust,"
and The Groom Talks ir
all.
ool of Graduate Studies,
Esslin, 4 p.m., Rackham
e Status of the American

d Cleaver, "Israeli Set-
ommons Room.
de, "Corporate Land use
Architecture Building.
ist Economy: The Ex-
r.
gins of Sexual Guilt in
o MTS Command Exten-
istration Building.
e Effects of Acid Rain on
Gardens, 1800 Dixboro
undo, "Gender, Self and
an," 4 p.m., Lane Hall
use.
ue.
Hall.
er Room, Union.
r Human Growth and
k Ascience, "How Older
121, 400 North Ingalls.
da Flanagan, 8 p.m., 802
-Electron Transfer, Elec-
s, 4 p.m., Room 1200,

Daily Photo by DARRIAN SMITH
Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.) and Democratic mayoral candidate Ed Pierce
spoke to Ann Arbor democrats and supporters at Dominick's restaurant
yesterday. A main topic was the problem of homeless people.

Prof wants students to examine social issues

Annu
"Chi
treet
eep,

al Ha

(Continued from Page 1)
values ... I was beginning to think it
out, and I gradually came to realize I
needed to have content in my classes."
He has since taught courses about
Latin America, unemployment, and
literature and social change.
In his "Vietnam and the Artist"
class, one of his most popular courses,
Alexander shows controversial,
sometimes disturbing films such as
Hearts and Minds and The Deer Hun-
ter. He says he wants students to
examine social issues - in the context
of film and literature - in light of their
own moral responsibility.
A PROFESSOR in the English depar-
tment for 14 years, Alexander uses an
unorthodox, non-hierarchical teaching
method which he labels "empowered
education." And that means if students
refuse to pick up their pencils to write a
quiz then he must not force them.
Alexander hands over to students the
responsibility of forming the structure
and content of his classes, so that they
can think about what they want to
learn. During the first lecture of each
course, Alexander asks his students,
"This is your class, what are you going
to do with it?"
"In most classroom situations,
students don't have a great deal of
power," he says. "In my class students
learn that hierarchical structures don't
have to be hierarchical ...
"WHEN STUDENTS begin to
discover that they're not powerless in
terms of this class, they can begin to
apply it to other parts of their life. It's a
method that works well with the subject
of the class."
Indeed, Alexander's classes are
known to attract students who are in-
volved in peace work and many at-
tribute his class with giving them the
impetus to do civil disobedience.
Last December five University
students were arrested for blocking the
entrance to Williams International
Corp. in Walled Lake, a firm that
manufactures engines used in cruise
missiles. Four of those students par-
ticipated in courses taught by Alexan-
der.
ONE OF those protesters, Maria
Ringo, enrolled in Alexander's "Viet-
nam and the Artist" class two terms.
The LSA senior said the informal struc-
ture of Alexander's course helped her
and others realize their own self-
determination.
"It's a way for people to ask them-
selves 'What am I doing here' and to
concentrate on their potential for
creative ideas," she says. "Whereas
"In other classes, the student is just a
cog in the machine, just taking it in and
spitting it out."
Ringo says Alexander's courses
usually attract more students from the
liberal political spectrum, but added
that they also draw "ROTCs and a lot of
other people you wouldn't consider 'lef-
ty.' They interest the element of studen-
ts who like to argue and who have
something to say."
BUT OTHER students say Alexander
often puts too much of a pessimistic at-
titude into his lectures, and that
POLICE
NOTES

classroom discussions are dominated
by an outspoken minority.
"I got annoyed at times because all
we ever talked about was how terrible
things were," says Michael Cutter, an
LSA junior. "Isn't war terrible, isn't
government terrible. The class was
used by a few people, not in a
manipulative way, but to stress their
point of view."
Alexander acknowledged the fact
that his courses trouble some students,
noting that of the 150 students who
enroll in his Vietnam film course each
term, as many as 50 drop out. Never-
theless, his classes are always full and
he often must turn away wait-listed
students.
"I SHOW them some painful stuff.
Some students have said they couldn't
take it. I want them out," he says about'
his film class. "It's a tough course for
people who are patriotic. It's hard if
you've always loved America."
Alexander's words are soft-spoken
and carefully articulated. The tall,
lanky man is cautious in his remarks,
fearful that they might be misunder-
stood. For years, he has been ex-
plaining the reasons behind his work
and that of local peace activists.
At a recent Campus Meet the Press,
Alexander appeared with Ringo and
two other students who were arrested
for civil disobedience at Williams In-

The Michigan Daily - Sunday, March 17, 1985- Page 3
Pierce supports day
shelter for homeless

(Continued from Page 1)
didate Richard Hadler in the April 1
city election.
During the discussion, Levin praised
Pierce as a good leader and stressed
the need for local leadership to face the
proposed Reagan budget cuts.
"HERE, I'm helping Ed Pierce,'who
is strong, independent, and outspoken.
You need local officials who will stand
up for your town," Levin said ad-
dressing a crowd of about 60 people.
"What's happening in Washington is
not good for this town," he said.
"Budget cuts in student loans and cuts
in welfare programs will be harmful for
Ann Arbor," he added.
Levin also addressed the plight of the
homeless, one of the key issues in the
mayoral campaign, on the national
level. He said that the proposed budget
cuts from welfare would leave gaps
that private charities may not be able
to fill. The situation for the homeless
would be worse, Levin said.
"We have to take a long look at the
flat tax. Tax simplification would have
a harsh impact on charities. We're
moving more and more to a free-
market economy," Levin said.
"Reagan says - and this is a direct
quote - every dollar that the gover-
nment doesn't spend, is a dollar that
will make us freer and richer.' The
implicantion on the homeless is clear."

Ann Arbor council member Jeff Ep-
ton (D-Third Ward) added that
released mental health patients tend to
fill up the city shelter. "We close up an
institution to save money," Epton said.
"We've allowed developers to choose
the direction we go in without concern
for the impact on the community," he
said.
State senator Lana Pollack (D-Ann
Arbor) took advantage of the gathering
to talk about a special election for a
state senate seat in Grand Rapids
which would decide which party will
control the state senate. Pollack , said
that Sen. John Engler (R-Mt. Pleasant)
vacated his seat in order to run for a
seat in congress. Pollack urged anyone
with relatives or friends in Grand
Rapids to tell them about the upcoming
election and encourage them to vote for
the Democratic candidate Steve Monsa
instead of the Republican challenger
State Rep. Vernon Ehlers (R-Grand
Rapids). "The state senate decides if
Blanchard's programs get through,"
she said. "I hate to pin Democratic
hopes on Grand Rapids, but we're close
(in recent polls)."
Other Democratic party members on
hand for the meeting included U.S.
representative Perry Bullard (D-Ann
Arbor) and Bunyan Bryant, who ran
against Pierce in the Democratic
mayoral primary.

HENRY RUSSEL LECTURE FOR 1984-85
SIDNEY FINE
Andrew Dickson White Professor of History
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
"CHANCE AND HISTORY:
SOME ASPECTS OF
THE DETROIT RIOT OF 1967"
TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 4:00 p.m.
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL

ternational. Often he would clarify
points they tried to make or amplify on
the background of the peace
movement.
Sitting behind a narrow table, next to
the three students, Alexander posed an
older image of the students, somehow
underscoring the continuance of ac-
tivism.
ONE OF the three Residential
College junior Mike O'Neill, says
Alexander's influence cuts even deeper

NOT ENOUGH ROOM IN YOUR TRUNK?

than showing support at a press con-
ference.
"A lot of students draw strength by
seeing one of their profs back what they
are doing," O'Neill says.
"A lot of people say 'you're young and
idealistic, you'll.grow out of it' as if (ac-
tivism) were some bad phase like
puberty or something. But Buzz has
been doing these things for a long time
now."

Sch
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Char
all C
Swed
rt &A
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eater
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ntro t
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