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March 16, 1985 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1985-03-16

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4

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Saturday, March 16, 1985

r

I. ii

I

Inquiring
Photographer
'By Dan Habib

I

"Should the state have
responsibility for abortions
for those on Medicaid?"

IN BRIEF

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports

4

.4

Belgium to deploy missiles

Jeannine Granda, LSA
sophomore: "I think poor
people should have the same
privileges as others. There
should be an attempt in
equality."

Jane Grover, LSA senior:
"The right to an abortion
should not be limited to those
who can afford it. To those
who, because of moral
reasons, want to eliminate the
welfare funding for abortion, I
would say, 'There are a lot of
things in the tax system that I
would rather not support, such
as the military budget."'

Esther Kirshenbaum, Ann
Arbor fine artist: "Absolutely.
We don't need the unwanted
kids. If there could be sub-
sidized programs for birth
control methods, I would
prefer that. But if they don't
have the money for abortion,
they'll have a child that the
state will have to support
anyway."

Paul Cuadros, LSA
sophomore: I think the state
should fund it. It's a hard bur-
den to have a kid. Having a
child is a lifetime respon-
sibility. The majority of abor-
tions help out poor women
whose babies might not be
adopted. Those kids just
become orphans. It's really a
woman's choice and a
women's issue."

Wayne Stombaugh, Bowling
Green University junior and
member of U of M Christian
Life: "It's a woman's choice
and it's a big responsibility to
have a child. But where was
her responsibility when she
conceived the child? I'm
against state financed abor-
tions. It's definitely a moral
issue when you're allowing
another to choose a person's
right to live."

Joe Kitzmillar, Bowling Green
University sophomore and
member of U of M Christian
Life: "It's totally wrong.
People like to say it's the
women's choice but do they
think to ask the baby what it
wants to do? That's why I'm
against it, because it can't
say. It's immoral."

Debra Moir, LSA sophomore:
"If people can't afford it, the
state should pay for it. I'm for
abortion, so if one can't pay
for it themselves, then the st-
ate should have a respon-
sibility to fund it."

David Juchau, 'Graduate
student: "It's been
established that women have
a right to have an abortion.
It's unjust to deny poor women
that medical service when
those women are provided
with other medical needs."

Tom O'Donnell, LSA senior:
"Women have an absolute
right to abortion, however
when a woman can't afford it,
it denies them this right. While
certain people are morally
opposed to abortion, they have
no right to deny women this
right. If the only way that that
right can be guaranteed is
through funding, then the
government has to provide
it.

Tama Carroll, LSA senior:
"It's a good thing the state fun-
ds it. If they had to find the
money themselves, it would
pose more problems-home
abortions, for ex-
maple-which would be
unhealthy for the mother. The
thing that worries me the most
is that they would have to
resort to drastic means to get
abortions."

GENEVA, Switzerland-U.S.-Soviet arms negotiators, taking a long
weekend after only one working session, faced a new obstacle yester-
day-deployment of U.S. cruise missiles in Belgium.
The decision to deploy U.S.-made NATO cruise missiles on Belgian soil
was hailed by the United States and by officials of the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization who have questioned Belgium's commitment to the
organization in the past five years.
Prime Minister Wilfried Martens, addressing Parliament Friday, said:
"The allies, in particular those who, like us, are committed to deploy th
missiles, believe it not acceptable that Belgium breaks the solidarity tha
exists within the alliance."
But Moscow yesterday warned that Belgium's decision to deploy 16 U.S:
cruise missiles immediately under a 1979 NATO plan raises "additional ob7
stacles" to the new arms talks.
Tass, the official Soviet news agency, said the decision by the Belgial
Cabinet Thursday night "came at a time when on the international
horizon, there appeared sparkles of hope for a relaxation of internation4
tension."
China congratulates Gorbachev4
PEKING-A simple Chinese message of congratulations to new Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev could signal the end of a bitter, 20-year-old feud
between the world's two largest Communist parties, officials said yesterday
In the first direct party-to-party exchange in nearly two decades, Go
bachev, the Soviet Union's new Communist Party general secretary, was oU,
fered "hearty congratulations" by his Chinese counterpart, Hu Yao-bang.
Hu's message was conveyed by Chinese Vice Premier Li Peng during a
Thursday meeting with Gorbachev in Moscow.
The official Xinhua News Agency said Gorbachev told the Chinese the two
communist rivals should "jointly work to reduce differences." Li told Gor.
bachev that China shared his desire for a "major improvement" izt
relations.
Militias seize Beirut stronghold
BEIRUT, Lebanon-Christian militias who demand an end to Syrian in-
fluence in the government seized the last Beirut position of Amin Gemayel's
loyalists yesterday. Syria said it would not accept mutiny against the embat
tled president, and the rebels asked for negotiations.
Rebel militiamen fired on Lebanese army units making the first attempt
to end the three-day-old uprising. An army spokesman later said troops sup'
ported by five armored personnel carriers and heavy jeep-mounted guns
moved between the Christian rivals north of Beirut and reopened the coastal
highway.
The Syrians reiterated their support of President Gemayel, a Maronite
Christian, and said they "will not take an uncaring attitude toward these
developments."
The Syrian government of President Hafez Assad said "Syria wishes to
emphasize its support for the Lebanese legitimacy," and described the
uprising as "a suspicious move connected with the Israeli enemy."
Reagan to work to improve
Soviet relationships, says Schultz
WASHINGTON-President Reagan, mindful that a unique "moment of op
portunity" is at hand, is. prepared to work with the new leadership in the
Soviet Union toward a more constructive relationship'"across the board,''
Secretary of State George Schultz said yesterday.
Schultz, continuing the administration's conciliatory tone toward Moscow
since the installation of Mikhail Gorbachev as the new Soviet leader, said:
Reagan is prepared to deal with specific Soviet-American problems and "to
achieve concrete results."
Based on their 85-minute meeting Wednesday, Schultz said he found Gor-
bachev a "very capable, energetic person who is businesslike. When you go
to a meeting he seems to be well informed, well prepared. He gets right at
the issues in a conversational kind of form."
While it appears that Gorbachev is prepared to work at improvin
relations in a "constructive vein," Schultz said, it remains to be seen
whether anything can be accomplished.
Schultz cautioned that the "good faith and hope" of the administration is
tempered by a "healthy measure of realism" about the Soviet Union-"
realism based on a history which has not always fulfilled our expectations."
Few capitalize on farm aid bill
WASHINGTON - An administration official said yesterday he is disap-
pointed only 61 farmers nationwide have been helped by President Reagan's
$650 million program of federal guarantees to help banks restructure farm
loans.
A weekly Agriculture Department survey showed that only $8.4 million in
guarantees have been made. Department officials conceded an earlier
figure of $25 million was based on an error in data collection.
Frank Naylor, undersecretary of agriculture in charge of farm loans, said
many rural banks are sending debt-strapped farmers to the Farmers Home
Administration rather than take advantage of the program announced last
fall.
Through February, a "very high" 40 percent of fall direct loans the agency
made were to farmers who turned to the agency for the first time, he said.
Vol. XVC - No. 130
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Tuesday through.Sunday
during the Fall and Winter terms and Tuesday through Saturday during the
Spring and Summer terms by students at the University of Michigan. Sub-
scription rates: through April - $4.00 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 outside the city.

Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. Postmaster: Send
address changes to The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and subscribes to
United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndi-
cate, and College Press Service.

(Irjtrcb h Lt)p ETUtCE0 Regents look at budget

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
120S. State
(Corner of State and Huron)
662-4536
Church School and Sunday Serice 9:30
and 11:00.
March 17: "Who Will Go For Us?"
giventby Dr. Donald B. Strobe.
Ministers :
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Rev. Gerald Wachterhauser
Education Director, Rose McLean
Wesley Foundation Campus Min-
istry, Wayne T. Large, Director.
Methodist Youth Choir
Broadcast Sundays 9:30a.m. - WNRS, 1290AM
Televised Mondays 8:00p.m.- Cable Channel 9

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
FOUNDATION
502 East Huron, 663-9376
(Between State and Division)
Sunday Worship, 9:55 a.m.
March 17: "Getting it Together"
sermon given by Robert B. Wallace
Wednesday evenings at 6:00 p.m.,
Lenten fellowship dinner and classes.
Pastor, Robert B. Wallace
Assistant in Ministry,
Madelyn Johnson
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave., 662-4466
(Between S. University and Hill)
Worship and Church School at 9:30
and 11:00
Jamie Schultz, Campus Ministry
coordinator.
Broadcast of Service:
11:00 a.m. - WPA G, 10.50AM
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL and STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw
Robert Kavasch, Pastor

models,may raise tuition

(Continued from Page 1)
commitment to that kind of distinction
and quality."
"Tuition may be inexcusably high,"
he said, "but state support is inex-
cusably low. It's a hoax to our future to
provide low cost, high accesibility, low
quality education. I don't want any part
of it."
Several regents also agreed. "I'd cer-
tainly like to see a situation where we
don't have to raise tuition," said Regent
Nellie Varner (D-Detroit). "Tuition's
excessively high:But if adequate fun-
ding does not come forth from our state,
we can't let our quality erode," she
said.
"WE MAY be the most expensive
public university in the country," said
Regent Deane Baker (R-Ann Arbor)
"but we're also probably the best," he
said.

Regent Thomas Roach (D-Saline)
cautioned that "all this is very,
preliminary. But we've had to cut back
on services quite a lot, we'll cut back
more only if we felt we had to. A modest
rise in tuition might be better.''
Frye presented the board with two
budget models for the Ann Arbor cam-
pus, one with a five percent tuition in-
crease, the other with a nine percent in-
crease.
UNDER FRYE'S figures, a five per-
cent increase would leave the Univer-
sity with a $4.4 million deficit, a figure
that would be unacceptable to the
regents, Baker said. But according to
Frye, this deficit would probably be
larger since building maintenance and
instructional equipment are not in-
cluded in the expenditure.

Students skip Dayton

SAVES BA BIES eWr663-5560
~Y~!I *1 Li 1 ~.j 9:15 a .m. Service of the Word
HELP FIGHT BIRTH DEFECTS 10:30a.m. Communion Service
7:30 p.m., Wednesday: Midweek L
THIS SPACE CONTRIBUTED BY THE PUBLISHER ten Worship

(Continued from Page 1)
sessions a team from Ohio was
playing," he explained.
en- Cooperstein said the problem of tran-
sportation factored into his decision
against the trip. "I didn't have a way of
getting down there," he said. "I could
have rented a car, but it's not worth it."
Deron Brod, an engineering
sophomore, planned to rent from
National Car Rental, but turned down

the idea because "it costs $52 to rent
from Thursday night to Monday mor-
ning."
STUDENTS APPARENTLY weren't
choosing the more expensive option of
taking a bus to Dayton either. A round
trip with the Ann Arbor Bus Company
runs $66.5Q, but a company spokesman
said "we haven't sold one in two
weeks."

The I'

Friday, March 15
Michigras Kick-off Happy Hour
4:00 pm - 7:00 pm
$1 admission
U-Club, Michigan Union
Saturday, March 16
Casino
Pendleton Room and Ballroom, Michigan Union
Battle of the Bands Finals

'A

The University Activities Center
is now accepting applications
for positions for:
COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSONS
for all committees.
Applications are due MARCH 22 and are
available at the UAC Off ices - 2105 MI Union.

MA

Sunday, March 17
Fashion Show
12:00 noon - 2:00 pm
$5 admission (Includes Buffet Lunch)

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Opinion Page Editors..........JOSEPH KRAUS
PETER WILLIAMS
ManagingEditors.........GEORGEA KOVANIS
JACKIE YOUNG
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RANDALL STONE
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