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February 15, 1985 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-02-15
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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41

Waiting too long brings the passport blues

Help

Wanted:

By Carrie LevMine
Hrror stories about obtaining pass-
ports and visas are part of almost
any traveler's tales. But it does not
have to be that way. Believe it or not,
the passport and visa hassle can be
bypassed by travelers who plan in ad-
vance.
A passport is the first, and most im-
portant, document a traveler needs to
go abroad. To apply for a passport, the
first step is to pick up a passport ap-
plication from either the county clerk's.
office, the main post office, or the In-
ternational Center in West Quad.
Complete the application and bring it
and a driver's license to the county
clerk's office at Huron and Main Sts.
Also needed is proof of U.S. citizenship,
such as a birth certificate or an old

passport. The cerificate must be im-
printed with a state seal and must have
been filed within one year of birth.-If it
was filed later than that, attach a writ-
ten explanation. Any questions regar-
ding the legitimacy of the certificate
should be directed to the county clerk's
office. U.S. citizens born out of the
country should bring citizenship
papers.
Next on the list are passport photos.
These have very specific requirements.
Do not bring an informal picture - not
even a school or yearbook portrait.
Any professional photographer can
take a passport photo, and will know the
size and paper requirements. The
University also provides photo services
for students and staff in the basement
of the LSA Building. Be sure to tell the
photographer in advance that it is to be
a passport picture.

The last necessary item is payment.
If 18 or under, the cost for the passport
is $20 (checks or money orders only).
There is also a $7.50 cash charge to
cover postage and processing. The
passport will be valid for five years. If
over 18, the cost will be $35 plus $7.50
cash, and it will be valid for 10 years.
The passport will take approximately
five weeks to be processed but during
March, April and May, it can take up to
6 or 7 weeks because of the rush of ap-
plications. Bring in the application at
least 2 months before departure to
provide enough time. Call the county
clerk's office ten days before departure
if the passport has not been received.
They will track it down.
If traveling to Eastern Europe; Asia,
Africa, Latin America or the Soviet
Union, a visa is also needed. It is also
necessary for travelers or students
remaining in Western Europe longer
than three months. An application for a
visa can be obtained from a travel
agent who will also assist in the ap-
plication process.
When making travel arrangements
without an agent, contact the consulates
of the countries to be visited. Send the
passport, completed application, two
extra passport photos, and an itinerary
to the consulate via certified mail. The

passport will be extremely difficult to
replace if lost in the mail, so send a self-
addressed stamped envelope (also cer-
tified) in which the consulate may
return the passport and visa.;
Visas generally take about three
weeks to be processed. Call the travel
agent or consulate if the visa has not
been received ten days before depar-
ture.
An international Student Identity
Card is the second best piece of iden-
tification abroad for students. These
can be obtained at the International
Center for $8. Also at the International
Center is information regarding
American Youth Hostel Cards, which
entitle students to low-cost accom-
modations abroad.
For visitors to Asia, Africa or Latin
America, vaccinations against cholera
and yellow fever are usually required.
Since each country (and each season)
has different immunization
requirements, contact the health
department or the Immunization Clinic
at University Health Services for
specific information.
Although an international student ID
provides limited insurance coverage,
the International Center offers sup-
plemental insurance packages.

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By A my Mindell
H AVING A HARD TIME FACING
another summer serving burgers
and beer to obnoxious customers? What
if the customers are speaking French
and the restaurant is in Paris?
It is much easier for a student to find
work in a foreign country than one
would believe.
"A lot of students overestimate the
difficulties of what it takes to get there"
said Jane Dickson, overseas oppor-
tunity advisor in the University's Inter-
national Center. "There is no reason
why people shouldn't go," she said.
Working abroad is an excellent op-.
portunity to learn about the people of a
country and become immersed in the
culture.
Whether planning a trip five days or
five months in advance there are a few
things to keep in mind. There are a few
basic rules to follow (or not follow).
First of all be flexible. Finding the job
of your dreams may be difficult, but
you will most likely be able to support
yourself for the length of your stay. For
most available jobs, the working hours
will be long, and the wages will match
those for similar employment in the
U.S.
"A person can't expect to make a lot
of money. Usually you'll only earn
enough to cover expenses while you're
there, and maybe travel afterwards.
Rarely does one make enough to cover
much more," Dickson said.
In order to work in a foreign country
a work permit is needed. It is possible
to go to the country and even find work
without a permit, but the job may be
unpleasant and there is a chance of
being deported.
One organization that will help
students get a work permit is the Coun-
cil on International Educational Ex-
change. It has an agreement with Great
Britain, France, Ireland, West Ger-
many and New Zealand to U.S. students
to work abroad in those countries on a
temporary basis while their students
come to the United States.
The council will also provide a book
on finding employment, a list of
possible employers, and information on
finding housing.

LSA sophomore Julie Starkel used
CIEE to get a permit last year to work
in Avignon, France. She recommends
using contacts, and not a book, to find
employment. She found her job through
a neighbor.
Her transition to French culture
wasn't "difficult or painful or anything.
I reached upper level French at the
University and there were no problems.
Well, at first they had to go real slow,"
she said.
This year Starkel is applying for work
in Europe through another
organization, the International
Association of Students in Economics
and business Management (AIER-
SEC).
AIESEC was created by European
students after World War II to "foster
goodwill between students," according
to AIESEC member and business
school junior Carolyn Kley.
This club tries to select a job accor-
ding to the student's qualifications and
preferences. It is mainly intended to be
a cultural experience, and those who
apply for a low level job could be "flip-
ping burgers" in Malaysia.
AIESEC does direct exchanges with
foreign business, and if 20 openings are
created in the Detroit area, 20 of the
University's AIESEC members are
eligible to work for a foreign company.
Participation in AIESEC requires
completion of two years of college and
membership in the association.
Another way to go is to be an 'au pair'
or mother's helper. This program is
mainly for females from 18 to 30 years
of age. An 'au pair' babysits and does
light housework in exchange for room,
board, and pocket money.
There are set rates for 'au pair' in
France, and in most countries they
work five days a week with at least one
day completely free.
Because an 'au pair' is not considered
domestic help, she must study the
language while in the country.
A lot depends on the family that em-
ploys the student. A typical Parisian
family could be very cold, yet
sophisticated, and make one feel like
'hired help,' while another family could
accept the 'au pair' into their fold as a
daughter.
There are 'au pair' positions

available in Italy, London, Austria,
Germany, Spain, Greece, and the
Canary Islands. Information on these
positions is available in the Inter-
national Center.
If not spending summers at camp is
hard to imagine, try a new camp, like
Camp Chalkidiki in Greece or Cam-
pamento Bochica in Colombia.
Programs are offered through the In-
ternational Camp Counselor
Program/Abroad, part of the YMCA.
To get this kind of job, one must have
experience working with groups of
children in camps or other settings.

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Venice as a gondolier.

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The Bookstore at th
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16 Weekend/Friday, February 15, 1985

Weekend/Frid

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