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February 15, 1985 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-02-15
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Climbing through the

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national parks

By Andy Weine
G owest, young man!"
goes the saying from some 19th
century personage whom I can't recall.
Back then, Michigan was considered
way out west, a part of the undeveloped
wilds (hence the name 'Midwest'). But
further west - that is, where Watt has
not unleased his developmental en-
tourage - lay hills and forests, rushing
streams and rivers, hot springs, griz-
zlies and bald eagles, lazy diner-and-
post-office towns, desert canyons, and
the high snowy peaks dazzling in sum-
mer sun.
Perhaps the best models for
travelling west are Kerouac and Gin-
sberg - those careening literary beat-
niks who traversed the continent with
their thumbs stuck out and their eyes
and ears wide open to every truck
driver, every eye-catching peak, every
fellow hitcher or train-hopper. For the
misty-eyed western bound shouldn't go
as tourists but as travellers, vagabon-
ds, wanderers, ramblers, and twen-
tieth-century siddartha's, if you will.
There's more than just semantics in-
volved here - the name reflects a
whole travelling philosophy to guide
one to the best spots and most
enlightening people.
The journey to wherever you're going
is all part of the fun, not just a distance
to be quickly passed over. Getting there
cheaply can be done by looking for a
ride on the Michigan Union ride board.
Campuses all over-the country, from
Boulder (a gem-like city) to Eugene to

Berkely to Bozeman, have ride boards
that teem with offers for riders going
everywhere in the summer.
Drive-aways are another inexpensive
alterantive, as is taking a bus - dread-
fully long and boring unless you open
your eyes to the landscape and to fellow
vagabonds.
For the patient and stalwart, there's
thumbing - difficult on transcontinen-
tal highways (watch out for cops) and
dangerous for women (go with someone
else) but still possible and potentially a
helluva lot of fun. Be sure to bring plen-
ty of cardboard for road signs.
A little-known travel tip that's the
estern traveller's best-kept secret (to
divulged here, forgive me) is the
Green Tortoise Bus Service. This fleet of
fat old Greyhounds with comfortable,
bedded interiors crawl across the coun-
try from Boston to San Francisco; Seat-
tle to San Diego, Alaska to California,
among other places. For not so much
money one can travel slowly, stopping
to hike in the Tetons, loll in Nevada hot
springs, raft on the Snake River, and
eat at wonderful hole-in-the-wall joints.
Camping and cooking cooperatively
along the way, the Tortoise gang has
the coolest bus drivers you'll ever meet
and the friendliest passengers (many
European travellers) with whom you're
bound to exchange addresses. The
foreign friends I made on my recent
Tortoise trip will help me on my up-
coming European ramble.
National park-hopping can be won-
derful, but a golden rule must be kept in
mind: get beyond the "scenic view"

By Elyse Kimmelman
Everyone has done it. They finally
take that big trip, the one they
have saved up for years to go on, and
they forget the camera, or worse, the
toothbrush.
For those heading to Europe or
just around the country, here are
a few suggestions to help make a
trip more enjoyable and easy.
Task number one is packing' The
most important thing to do is take as lit-
tle as possible. Lugging loads of
baggage will not only tire a traveller
out, it will limit the purchase of
souvenirs along the way. A good rule is

to choose clothing which is durable,
versatile, and easy to launder.
Forgetting clothes is not ususally a
problem, but leaving behind such
essential items as a toothbrush or
shampoo is. Make a checklist just to be
safe.
In addition' to such basic items as
toiletries and clothes, the checklist
should include such items as a travel
alarm clock, first aid kit, a sewing kit,
plastic bags for towels and wash-
clothes, sun lotion, and extra prescrip-
tion medication.
Other accessories that should be in-
cluded on the list are photocopies of im-
portant papers, sunglasses, a raincoat,
a flashlight, and a travel book.
The next step is checking out the

money situation. The wisest thing to do
is not to carry cash, even if touring in
the U.S. It is best to carry travellers'
checks. If lost or stolen, they are
replaceable. Most local banks sell
traveler's checks at one percent
charge. It doesn't make a difference
which brand is chosen, as they are all
equally reliable and acceptable.
For those heading to Europe, it is ad-
visable to obtain a small amount of
foreign currency before - leaving. It
might be helpful for busses, tips, and
phone .calls. In the country exchanges
for foreign currency can be made at
local banks or the airport. Bring bills in
small denominations so not as much
will be lost on the exchange.
Also, most U.S. credit cards can be

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Weine's climbing partner takes a rest in the Tetons.

road signs. The signs deceive, because
the most scenic views are off the road
and on the trail. Buying the scantiest
camping gear enables you to enter the
Rocky Mountain backwoods, the
glorious Teton peaks, and the eerie
desert rock formations of graveyard
Bryce and Utah's canyonlands.
Viewing the Grand Canyon from the
tourist-snapshot rim doesn't do the
gorge justice like hiking the trails that
descent a mile deep to the muddy
Colorado River. And if multi-day ad-

ventures aren't your thing, at least day
hikes can get you a good ways into the
real interior.
Must-see parks include Utah's Zion,
with its bulging, polished rock, high
narrow canyons, and winding trails
that switchback to lofty perches. More
in the desert climate are Mesa Verde,
Bryce, and Grand Canyon - all nice
but, be warned, often hot, hot, hot, and
tafficked in the summer (fine off
season). The crowds at Yellowstone
See NATIONAL, Page 13

Chicago
(Continued from Page 6)
Wax Trax, by the way, is located
right next to the Biograph Theatre,
where John Dillinger was gunned down
by FBI agents in 1934 after enjoying a
fine movie with a lady-friend.
Alcohol definitely qualifies as part of
a college student's social life and Chicago
has a variety of pubs and clubs to quen-
ch that maize and blue thirst.
For under-age freshmen and
sophomores, there are "21 and under"
spots such as AKA, again on north
Broadway, and Medusas. Both are ex-
tremely unconventional and wildly fun
dance halls which provide solid enter-
tainment that may even top Dooley's.
Others will want to check out the
formal late-night establishments of
Rush Street, Clark Street, and the near

north side. Identification is required,
as is a high tolerance.
Every summer, Chicago hosts a
variety of ethnic street fairs, most of
which provide large amounts of tasty
foreign cuisine. The annual "Taste of
Chicago," held in a different spot from
year-to-year, highlights items from
over 70 top area restauragts.
Beware of the crowds - one may
never even get to the food. Most
residents prefer the lesser known and
less-crowded local fairs.
One facet of Chicago that's often
ignored it its sports stadiums, inhabited
finally by winning teams. Back in the
days when Chicago was known as fhe
"city of losers" the teams had trouble
attracting even local residents, but the
days of athletic embarrassment have
long passed for this city.
Traditional Wrigley Field--still the
only baseball ' stadium without

lights-is an exciting trip back to the
days before million-dollar contracts
and Howard Cosell. Although the White
Sox didn't play so well last year,
Comiskey Park offers perhaps the
widest variety of ethnic food stands in
any sports arena.
The most underrated Chicago feature
is probably the gorgeous skyline. Any
city or suburban resident will testify
that walking along the lake, jogging
through Lincoln Park, or just strolling
down Rush Street on a cool summer
night simply cannot be beat.
How can the unfamiliar visitor find
these too-good-to-be-missed sights?
Unlike most major cities, Chicago's
rapid-transit system is relatively ef-
ficient, quick, and thorough. The
Regional Transportation Authority
traverses the entire city with buses and
trains, and travel information is easy to
obtain by phone.

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4 Weekend/Friday, February 15, 1985

Weekend/Friday

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