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February 05, 1985 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, February 5, 1985 - Page 3
'U' promotes extra-curriculars

By GARY PEITSCH
A new University program is being
implemented this year for the students
who pass through the University
without ever learning about the wide
range of available extra-curricular ac-
tivities.
Working to promote a better Univer-
sity awareness is the new College
Community program.
Currently in progress at West Quad
and Couzens dormitories, the College
Community Program is designed to
create "an intimate college setting
within the general population," accor-
ding to Alan Levy, West Quad building
director and a program organizer.
Eighty students, mostly freshmen,
are involved in the West Quad CCP.
Though it does not cost anyting to join
the program, space is limited to
residents.
In addition to seminars on topics like
stress management and test taking, the
program invites members of the
University to speak to the group.

ON SUNDAY, University President
Harold Shapiro told CCP members
about the necessity of the humanities in
education.
"It's extremely important to have
meaningful exposure to the
humanities," Shapiro said.
"Humanities have never been more
important than they are now.''
Levy hopes that Shapiro's visit will
open the door for other faculty mem-
bers to get involved in the program. We
want to help the students to overcome

the intimidation of the huge university,
to feel that the faculty is ap-
proachable," Levy said.
One section of English 125 (Introduc-
tory Composition) is currently taught
at West Quad as part of CCP. Next year
organizers hope to add a section of
Math 115.
"Next year we'll be set to get off the
ground with some force," said Dave
Cohen, a resident advisor and program
facilitator.

*

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Give the MICHIGAN DAILY
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Stir Of
a

STUDENT PHONATHON
CALLERS WANTED
Part Time Employment
Nights

Deer-ly beloved Daily Photo by CAROL L. FRANCAVILLA

Venison hangs out freshman football player Sean Guffey's fourth floor Sout
quarterback Chris Zurbrugg, bagged the deer a month and a half ago and cook:
LSA eponders earlier
class starting tim
I*

h Quad window. Guffey, who rooms with
ks the meat at a friend's house.
USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

The School of Education will be interviewing students by phone to
call alumni nationwide for an alumni fundraising phonathon.
" Phonathon held Sunday through Thursday evenings
March 4 through April 4
" Callers will be expected to work two of the five nights each
week with some opportunity for additional hours.
" $4.00 per hour, nightly incentives, occasional snacks
Call for an interview between 10:00 am. and 4:30 pm. Tuesday,
February 5 through Friday, February 8
CALL 763-4288
The University of Michigan is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer

(Continued from Page 1)
"I think there could be a different
way. I just hate the thought of getting
up any earlier," said Julie Hurst, an
LSA freshwoman.
"I wouldn't want to get for an 8:30, no
way," Angelia Wimberly, a sophomore
LSA student said.
"I DON'T want to do it. It's too early.
I hate my 8 a.m. (on central campus)
as it is," said Chris Steffen, a freshman
engineering student.
For the student studying late into the
night, earlier classes could make for
; even earlier rude awakenings.
"It's tough to get up when you pull a
late night studying . . . seven o'clock
comes very early," said George Den-

drinos, a junior business student who
lives in Baits Housing on North Cam-
pus.
It's a little too early if you live on Nor-
th Campus," he said. "They'll (the
early classes) fill up, but only because
people will have to take them."
Some students were open to the idea)
if it would benefit them.
"If it would save me money I would,
but why should I be inconvenienced for
nothing," said LSA freshwoman Kathy
Salley.
If it opened more "good" classes said
John McCleary, a sophomore engineer,
it would be worth it.
"If that would get us more economics
and communication classes that would
he alright" he said.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS AND COMPUTER SCIENTISTS

-HAPPEINGS-
Highlight
The Michigan Union Arts Program presents Elizabethan and Baroque
Music featuring Ellen Hargis and Barb Weiss at 8 p.m. in the Pendleton
Room of the Union.
Performances
School of Music - Piano recital, William Ransom, 8 p.m., Rackham
Assembly Hall.
Speakers
Asian American Association - Curtis Van Voorhees, "Personal Growth
and Achievement Through Goal Setting," 8:30 p.m., Kuenzel Room, Union.
Computing Center - Chalk Talk, "Visual File Editing," 12:10 p.m., Room
1011 NUBS; F. Hartman, "Intro to the MTS File Editor, Part III," 3:30 p.m.,
Room 165, Business Administration Building.
Ecumenical Campus Center - P. Chowdry, "Choice of Technology: A
Major Concern for International Development", noon, International Center,
921 Church Street.
Chinese Studies - David Zweig, "Agrarian Radicalism in China from
1968 to 1978," noon, Lane Hall commons.
Meetings
Ann Arbor Go Club -7 p.m., Room 1433, Mason Hall.
Michigan Student Assembly - 7:30 p.m., Assembly Chambers, Room
3909, Union.
Thrner Geriatric Clinic, UM Hospitals - Newcomer's Group, 1 p.m., 1010 Wall St.
Wall Street.
University Alanon - noon, Room 3200, Union.
AIESEC - International Business Management Club, 5:15 p.m., Room 131
Business Administration Building.
Center for Eating Disorders - Support Groups, 7:30 p.m.
Human Growth Center, 2002 Hogback Street, Suite B.
M iscellaneous
His House Christian Fellowship - Bible Study, 7:30 p.m., 925 East Ann
Street.
Museum of Art - Art Break, "Masterworks from the DIA", 12:10 p.m.
CRLT Workshop - A. W. Storey, "Speaking Skills", 3:30 p.m., 109 East
Madison Street.
Chemistry Seminar, F. Mclafferty, "Tandem Mass Spectrometry", 4
p.m., Room 1300, Chemistry Building.-
Human Growth & Development - Brown Bag Lunch, A. Drenowski,
"Eating Disorders in College Populations," noon, Room 1000, 300 Northt
Ingalls Building.
Microcomputer Center - Workshop, "Introduction to Spreadsheeting", 10
a.m., Room 3113 School of Education Building.
English - Readings, Jonathan Aaron, 4 p.m., West Conference Room,
Rackham.
Program in American Institution - Workshop, 3 p.m., Pond room A & B,
Union.
Student Organization Development Center - Workshop, "If Nobody
Knows, Nobody Goes: Programming & Publicity", 6:30 p.m., Union.
Biological Sciences - Seminar, Wayne Frasch, "Interaction of The
Nuclear and Chloroplast Genomes in the Biogenesis of Chloroplast
Rihnomes "noon Room 1139. Natural Science Building.

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