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February 05, 1985 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-02-05

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Ninety-five Years
Of
Editorial Freedom

C I
be

Mit 4

tti

Dusting
Light snow expected with highs
near 25 degrees.

Vol. XCV, No. 104 Copyright 1985, The Michigan Daily Ann Arbor, Michigan - Tuesday, February 5, 1985 Fifteen Cents Ten Pages
Fires hit S. Quuaadtudets
Students evacuate dorm ts
minutes of each other, were in trash closets inJ l
By JERRY MARKON Kelsey, Frederick, and Gomberg Houses, a
City and University officials suspect arson was men's bathroom in Gomberg House, and a first
the cause of five early-morning fires that sent floor bulletin board.
South Quad dormitory residents into the cold South Quad has been plagued by trash can
yesterday morning. fires since 1978, and last year dorm residents and
The investigators need "a witness - even just fire officials became concerned about a rash of
one person" said city fire. inspector Robert small blazes that occured during final exams.
Harris. He said investigators are interviewng Although yesterday's fires were small, Harrisr,:Ver ai
dormitory residents and staff members.s hgb r.
The investigation "could last a day, it could said the damage could have been worse. It's a
last a week," said Lee Larson, deputy fire mar very serious situation. If it continues to happen, By RACHEL GOTTLIEB teed Student Loans, the largest of the
shall for the Ann Arbor Fire Department."I it's quite possible that a fire could get out of and KERY MURAKAMI federal low-interest loan programs.
depends on the response we get from the residen- hand. The University could lose up to $3 Grotrian said that limit could cost
ts " "A fire in a trash can usually puts itself out," million in financial aid money under 3,500 University students on the Ann
LARSON SAID the fire and police departments he said "but with a bulletin board there arePresident Reagan's proposed 1985 Arbor campus an average of $675 in lost
have several suspects, but he would not say other things on the wall that could catch on fire." budget which was released yesterday. aid.
odomtr "I would be concerned if I were a South Quad The budget calls for a $2.9 billion cut A self-help requirement which would
whether the suspects were students or dormitory resident," Harris said. He urged residents to Tneuat sd wit $2. billion force students to contribute $800 in
residents. "keep their eyes open, and if you see any strange education spending with $2.3 iid other earnings in order to receive a Pell
The fires "were of a suspicious nature," said happenings, let the floor directors know im- com g from federal financiaai grant is included in the plan. Reagan
University Housing Security Manager Joel mediately." programs. . made a similar proposal during his first
Allen," but we're so early into it that we just FIRE OFFICIALS said dormitory fires are a .,rUniversity lobbyist in Washington mea sml Coposs durinthd fis
don't know." serious problem because students tend to be slow Thomas Butts estimated that the State term, but Congress defeated the
Some South Quad residents said they had been in evacuating the building when the fire alarm of Michigan might lose a total of $33.1 measure.
told the fires were the result of a hazing stunt for goes off.- million in student aid funds. rationa beid this"nsaid
a fraternity. "I've heard that rumor also," said Battalion Chief John Hartlep, who was at the The University's share of that figure Bra Daridsn, a eca is in
campus Safety Director Walt Stevens, "and fire, said the fire department "faces this could affect 40-45 percent of the studen- eeping with the traditional value of
people are looking into it, but there's nothing problem every time it enters a University ts n receivinid, sid students contributing to the cost of their
cocee"bidn+ Grotrian, the University director of suetcoritg t h oto hi
concrete. building - students don't want to leave."BcFlgeeuctin"
Fire fighters arrived on the scene Monday at "Iwesuntdo'watolav. financial aid. college education."
If we have a few more of these at the Quad, Teaan ud.aGrotrian said the requirement would
4:05 a.m., four minutes after receiving a call people won't be leaving," he said. The Reagan budget would also plac
from University security, and found a total ofP "IewAntVeYlevsheih a $4,000 limit on the amount of federal not have a great impact on University
five different fires. Three had already been put donASlERY erswhen Iwetthe aid a student could borrow, as well as since the current award packages
out by security officers and the dormitory staff, don't like to deal with human life like that,"he A scored bulletin board shows the effects of Sunday banning all grant programs, including already have a self-help responsibility
The two remaining fires were put out within said. night's series of fires in South Quad. Pell grants, for students whose families built into them.
minutes. "Anything could happen if this contnues.earn more than $25,000 a year. Students The University's own self-help
THE FIRES, which apparently started within See POLICE. Page 2 from families making over $32,500 requirement stipulates that freshmen
would become ineligible for Guaran- See REAGAN, Page 5
. .... .. ...,.... .....,.. .....n t n ..t ..n« . J ' .Y : N .t::::.::...........Y .'"" :r
,..,."~ J r : . .. .........:... ....t ... M1.! ,.. ..:..JrYM .A r ." ..f ., 't.4A.n ""C . J ..
* next fall and East Engineering under-goes renovation for Further energy savings would be gained from closing
A proposal to move the starting time of LSA classes the Psychology Department. buildings earlier. Under Cather's plan classes in many
ahead one half hour was presented to the LSA faculty "T HE RE AR E a dozen classrooms that will be taken out buildings would end at 4:20 instead of 5 p.m.
yesterday by LSA Associate Dean James Cather. of the system," when the renovations in East Engineering A MOVE FROM on-the-hour starts in LSA classes would
Cather said a shortage of classrooms and energy waste begin, said Cather-.eur htohrclee~nteUiestmil hs
hasprmpedthereom enatonwhchisat eat yar There are barely enough classrooms for the classes from requiretht others coleges ihe Univdjrstymil.hs
naha f opefhf, cmedtin c isfataeastoyear 9-4 in the day, said Cather. North Campus classes start on the half hour to allow time
ti l eTHE PROPOSAL would advance the starting time of all Between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m., however, only 62% ofte for transportation between the two campuses.
LSA classes ahead, starting with 9:10 a.m. moving to 8:30 available space is used, according to Cather. "It's something we have to consider," said James Duder-
THE BUILDINGS have to be heated to a suitable tem- sat eno h olg4 niern."fLAde
P The lack of space for classes has grown with the perature by 8 a.m. when most faculty come into their of- switch to on the half-hour we'd have to switch," he said.
1" S renovations in Lorch Hall to the point that "we simply have fices. EVEN THOUGH the plan, if approved, would not go into
9! ifewer classrooms than classes between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., "That's a lot of space you're paying to heat and light that effect before 1986-87, some students are already opposed to
J ~said Cather. you don't use," Cather said. "That is basically just it.
The situation .willt e even more difficult when 700 throwing money away." Cather said the savings would add See L SA Page 3
v~... .. .. .. .... . ....W ... ..... JM :.: : ...v .t ..Y ::n.Y .,r, ...n. 1...n
.t.4 w, .. 1A .... n.. \ ..t...3! v.... .. \..... ....\ n. .... Li" !... . !. : n.1 .... ' ......, . .... n l . ... A : m: ... ...:.. . . ..........n... . . . . ... .:......... . .v.. ef.
,.....n ....... ... ,.::. . . . 5... . .t.. . . . ... \. .. ...S.. . .....*.S'...3 M. . .. ~ t '.,x, :.. ... Y .. . . ""t :..... .\t....h ... . .
.. . .... .. ... ... .. r . 1 , .. t . .r . .... . . . ..... ..... J .. .. . .. . 1 .. ... .. ..-nt- ... .... ..... ..n.,. ....'.. .. n .. .. v t.. ,..... .
Council debates changes
0
in voter registration ~.....
was finally passed gives the city clerk was run in a loose fashion," said North-
By BILL HAHN authority over the registrar system and cross who oversees the deputy registrar
and ARONA PEARLSTEIN allows the clerk to draw up further program. "We hardly have any control ..................... .
After heavy debate last night over suggested changes which must be over it." ~
proposed changes in the city's voter presented to Council for approval. NORTHCROSS complained that un-
registration system, City Council voted The original resolution, which was der the current system any number of
not to make any immediate changes. authored by the City Clerk's office and votes could become registrars.
Council was originally to vote on a supported byFthe Republicans on City "Anybody could become a deputy," she
proposal to tighten controls over the Counci calefobr reater restritioen said. "Wer in tae asse a
onteailthfvoest eoe depf said.w"Wepreallytdn'ot he LA acystm R dzncasomsta ilbetknot bilig ol ofa :0ista f5pm
deputy registrar program, which uyrgsas.accountability because we were unable
allows votes to sign up as deputy Calls to reform the system came to keep track of the large flow of
registrars. from City Clerk Winifred a shoss in r"ge.sr."
THE AMENDED resolution which may of last year. "The current system See CITY, Paged
Family housing hike proposed_
LSA lases hea, sartig wth :10a~m moing o 830 HE UILINGShav tobe eatd t a sitale em It' somthig w hae t coside," aidJams Dder
a~m stdtDea ofth Colee d Eninerig, f .SA oe

By VIBEKE LAROI THE recommendation must be ap- David Foulke, assistant director of I ..L ,
Rental rates for the University's proved by housing director Robert resident operaitons. He said utilities
family housing will be increased only Hughes and then by the regents at their account for 30 to 40 percent of the rent
4.9 percent for next year if a commit- meeting later this month. Hughes said charged in family housing.
tee's recommendations are approved he will support the proposal, and the IN THE Northwood I, II, and III
this month. regents traditionally approve his plan. complexes, Foulke said, the outdated
Under the plan proposed by the The 4.9 percent hike would be one of central heating system leads to higher
Family Housing Rate Study Commit- the lowest increases in recent years. utility costs. An engineering firm is a .sz ..
tee, 1985-86 student rates will range The rates went up 5.8 percent last year studying the system, but no changes
from $285 per month for an efficiency at and the increases were larger in will be made until their report is com- Coldcash Associate ress
University Terrace to $450 per month previous years. plete. soite rs
for a three-bredroom apartment in Nor- The smaller increase is possible The system does not allow residents Witold Dabrowski, 25, of West Hartford, Conn., operates a snowblower from his wheelchair Sunday after a snow storm.
thwood V. Faculty and staff pay 10 per- because utility costs have risen at a to adjust their own heat. "It's usually Dabrowski invented the rig to earn some money while going to school. He suffered a spinal cord injury in a 1969 motor-
cent more. slower rate thisyear, according to See FAMILY, Page 2 cycle accident.
TODAY
script. The scenes are "fireside chat," an easy chair near a room - including his free-standing closet, desk and new the sheriff needs to eat in the jail," he said. "They were a
wall; the "rainbow scene," a plump pillow with a rainbow waterbed - and arranged it on the frozen surface exactly little too extavagant," he said. "I want the meals to be ap-
and balloons in the background; and "dungeon scene," a as it stood in the dormitory. Larkin, of New York City, said pealing. I want them to be nutritious. But I think they can
desk, books and a bare brick wall and, finally, a bathtub full he didn't know who was responsible for putting his be both and still be cost-efficient." Since then, McWhorter
of suds with a red backdrop and mirrors. The last one, belongings on ice. He rounded up a group of friends to help has hired a new chief jailer to plan meals. He said she is
Evanski said, "Appears for some reason, to be the most him move everything back. "That was quite annoying," he trying to cut jail food costs in half by serving more ham-
popular one with the ladies." added.. burger, chicken, tuna and sandwiches, with groceries from
a wholesaler rather than a supermarket.
Video Valentines Chilling prank Jailhouse cuisine
A n enterprising Michigan State University Music .

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