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January 24, 1985 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1985-01-24

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Ninety-five Years
of
Editorial Freedom

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'1V4 3 U

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Milkshake
Cloudy and windy with a chance
of snow. High in the mid 20s.

ol. XCV, No. 94 Copyright 1985, The Michigan Daily Ann Arbor, Michigan - Thursday, January 24, 1985 Fifteen Cents Eight Pages
Engineering Humanities: Moving to SA
By JERRY MARKON April of 1983, ending a tradition dating back to "has every intention of expanding our liberal total of eight faculty members by next fall-t- "we don't care how you write, just as long as
Next years crop of incoming engineering the early 1920's. arts requirements, and pushing the technical wo to LSA, one to the Residential College, and you get some ideas down."
£reshmen will be taking their humanities cour- THE COMMITTEE proposed that the depar- stuff onto the graduate level." the other to retirement. Fssh mn Goyin Aha ls eshoed
ges alongside their peers in LSA due to the tment gradually wither away over a seven year A shrinking faculty had plagued the depar- The remaining four professors will teach this sentiment, saying that his Humanities 101
elimination of the Engineering Humanities period since it had already lost many faculty only six courses, and as they retire, the elec- class was "easy-if you want a high school
Department. members and was facing financial difficulties. Th___ged_,hwee,_______n "Ige_____iriyt tives will be discontinued, course."
Unlike previous years, freshman engineers will This proposal was accepted by the University 'Engineering students The college does, however, plan to retain - I gained some familiarity with books that I
have to complete the writing test at orientation regents in September of 1983, and the im- seven professors for courses in technical com- wouldn't read otherwise, but I didn't learn
in order to be placed in sections of English 125. plementation has been in the "planning stages must have a broader munication. ahe abrut stiin skills ths id wu , d
IN ADDITION, engineering humanities Prof. ever since," according to Associate Dean of FOR NOW, te eparsest ofe ts haves he "sded "
Ralph Loomis expects that most upper level Engineering Charles Vest. liberal education. freshman literature courses, but some students Humanities 101 sucked said freshman
engineering students will be fulfilling their Dean of Engineering James Duderstadt said - James Duderstadtare ritical of the class quality. Ga rk jusck 'e e sso m it ea
humanities requirements with LSA courses by that the original decision to eliminate the - hEngineering freshman Kevin Gilligan said just because we're engineers, so I didn't really
ext fall. humanities department reflected the Engineering dean that his Humanities 101 class "didn't exactly learn anything."
Loomis says he is the "informal head of our philosophy that "engineering students must ___________________ encourage my interest in literature." LOOMIS attributed these complaints to the
remaining literary group," a title he uses have a broader liberal education." He said that his Humanities 102 class this college's decision not to hire new professors,
because his former department no longer of- "OUR STUDENTS can't get this liberal term isn't challenging enough. "It's nice and which has ballooned section sizes from about 25
ficially exists, nor does it have a chairman. education in Engineering-they must get it in tment since the early 1970's. it's great, and I'm going to get an 'A', but it's students since the early 1970's to as many as 100
A review committee appointed by the LSA," Dudestadt said. "Faculty attrition is continuing in what's left like a high school class," Gilligan continued. students today.
engineering humanities department originally Because of this growing commitment to the of the humanities department," Loomis said. GILLIGAN paraphrased his TA in section 11 "It's the kind of thing that happens when you
recommended the department's elimination in humanities, he said the engineering college The "literary group" will lose half of its current of Humanities 102 as saying on the first day; See ENGINEERING, Paget

Blanchard

wants

more

money for

state's schools

Left right, left Daily Photo by KATE O'LEARY
Members of the Navy ROTC fall into the Kellog Institute yesterday to attend a presentation of the advantages of
nuclear submarines. The film and talk they will see is aimed at bringing the recruits into the nuclear submarine branch
of the U.S. Navy.
Director evaluates Union chan es
By RITA GIRARDI The Bookstore also has exclusive rights to sell Univer-
"The Union was essentially a tomb four years ago. It was sity insignia items in the Union. The rights were previously
probably one of the worst unions in the country." held by the Michigan Emblem Shop, which was closed last
Those were the impressions Frank Cianciola said he had of year because of a "space crunch," Ciaciola said.
the Michigan Vnion when he was appointed director in 1980. A hike in rent and the failure to win rights to sell
Cianciola yesterday defended massive renovation of the memorabilia were the two reasons the U-Cellar moved out of
Union - which has caused a $450,000 deficit in the Union's the Union. Ciaciola said the U-Cellar never had a clause in its
budget - as necessary to improve the building's image. contract to sell insignia items and that the bookstore's rent
,CIANCIOLA, speaking at Campus Meet the Press, said the had not been raised in the four years before it left.
Union will not resolve its financial woes by hiking student When the Board of Regents renewed the U-Cellar's con-
fees. "Part of our whole desire is to not place that burden on tract in 1981, the governing board ordered the Union to set
lie students," he said. rent rates which competed with other rental space. The in-
lHe hopes income from retail shops operated by the Union creased rent the Union wanted to charge the U-Cellar - $9.07
on the ground floor and from rental space will ease the per square foot - was still less than the bookstore paid for its
building's deficit. North Campus space; Cianciola said "They decided to
* Rent received from the new Barnes and Noble Bookstore is vacate. They were never forced out," he added.
one way the Union will compensate for budget problems. The Student office space on the fourth floor of the Union will be
bookstore is paying five times the rent charged to the expanded and renovated in the future, Cianciola said. In five
University Cellar, before the student-run bookstore left three years the building will be on the "cutting edge" of student
years ago. unions across the country, he added.

By KERY MURAKAMI
Gov. James Blanchard brought en-
couraging news for education last night
as he called for spending increases in
education, including more financial aid
funding, a $25 million higher education
research fund, and a capital investment
program to build 12 new buildings at the
state's colleges.
In his third State of the State address
to the state legislature, Blanchard
called for a zero-increase budget, "with
the exception of increased investment
in education."
ALTHOUGH details of these in-
creases will not be released until the
governor formally submits his budget
recommendations to the state
legislature next week, aides say Blan-
chard will seek an increase of over $300
million in funding for education, in-
cluding an 11 percent increase in higher
education and a 9.2 percent increase
per student to local school districts.
Blanchard called for hikes in scholar-
ship monies and financial aid as well as
the establishment of a "research ex-
cellence fund" for the state's three big
research institutions.
"We will extend our search for ex-
cellence through Michigan's public
universities through a $25 million
higher education research and
development effort," he said.
BLANCHARD declined to give more

details about his plans for higher
education, but University officials last
night were encouraged just the same.
"The optimism of the speech, clearly
indicates that there will be increases in
higher education," said Richard Ken-
nedy, vice president for state relations.
He added, however, that appropriations
for education are always the most con-
troversial among legislators.
University President Harold Shapiro
said Blanchard's address was a "good
speech. It reflects the governor's con-
tinued interest in education."
SHAPIRO said he was "looking for-
ward to more details" when the specific
budget recommendations _are made
public next week.
Blanchard's recommendation for a
capital investment program could
translate into money for the renovation
of several buildings on campus, Ken-
nedy said.
The E.H. Krauss biological sciences
building, a chemical sciences building,
engineering facilties on North Campus,
and the University Replacement
Hospital are likely recipients of state
money, he pointed out.
"These were all high priorities in our
requests to the state legislature," he
said.
Blanchard's upbeat address touted
the "Michigan is Back" theme. He
called for six new prisons and prison
reform, public programs to create 8,000
jobs, and tightening the state's tax laws
to "make our tax system more fair."

... delivers address

The governor also promised that any
budget surplus would be returned to
tax-payers through a property tax
relief proposal.

United Press International
tributed to this story.

con-

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WHYT
announcer
protests
'suspension

By BILL HAHN
WHYT disc jockey J.J. Walker an-
nounced yesterday that he had
barricaded himself into the station's
broadcasting booth and vowed not to
leave until the station's management
reinstated morning announcer Bobby
Mitchel, who was "indefinitely suspen-
ded."
"I'll open the door as soon as I see
that Bobby is reinstated,"said Walker
on the air last night.
MITCHEL was suspended around 9
a.m. yesterday because of what WHYT
management called "the offensive con-
tent of his morning show."
According to reports, Mitchel had
discussed the case of King Boots, the
sheep-dog authorities believe killed its

owner's mother. A judge in Bir-
mingham, Mich., ruled Tuesday the
dog must be defanged, castrated, and
restricted to its owners property or
King Boots would have to be destroyed.
No comment from WHYT
management on the content of Mit-
chel's statement was available last
night.
"I DIDN'T think the show was offen-
sive," said Walker, "it was funny."
Walker said WHYT's managers were
not giving the announcers freedom to
make the radio station unique. "Either
we do the radio station we intended to
or .. ." Walker said starting to play a
record in the middle of his sentence.
Listeners in the Detroit area flooded
WHYT with phone calls and requested

lines voicing their support for Walker.
"Thousands of people have called in
demanding Mitchell's reinstatement,"
Walker said, "but until he is - I'm
staying on the air."
During Walker's broadcast last night,
a message came over the air from
WHYT management apologizing for the
"offensive" content of Mitchel's mor-
ning show. "I don't see what they're
apologizing for when thepeople have
nothing to apologize about," said
Walker.
Walker said that he had talked to
management earlier last night buy they
"got a little ticked" about his request.
"I think they've over reacted," Walker
said, "but occasionally you have to take
a stand."

Risks in Lorch Hall
push employees out

By JODY BECKER
Noise and asbestos dust has caused at
least one University employee to move
out of her office in Lorch Hall. The
building is undergoing extensive
renovation, and asbestos was recently
removed from piping and insulation.
"It's very stressful to be in the
building where there's so much noise
and dust and asbestos," said Marcia
Hall, a graduate student in sociology
who has relocated her project in
another building.

"I'D SAY there's a lot of anger and
resentment about the fact that this was
going on (the removal of asbestos). We
are being dumped on. I'm not sure who
should have been protecting us from
asbestos exposure, I'll just say 'the
University' in quotes." One other em-
ployee, who could not reached for
comment, has moved out of the
building.
Adrienne Garcia, a secretary in Lor-
ch Hall, said she looked into getting a
leave of absence, but has decided
See POOR, Page 3

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TODAY
How cold is it?

Some of the responses to the question included, "It was so
cold that... Even my soft water was hard; Even the world.
leaders couldn't get into a heated argument; when I went
out my shadow froze to the sidewalk; You could freeze an
egg on the sidewalk; The altar boys had to jump-start the
candles; My fasle teeth chattered... and they weren't even.
in my mouth; I saw a 32nd-degree Mason, and he was down
to 15. So how cold was it? Well, it was pretty cold.
RBllv flnn

abdomen, police said. "He tried to get a loan that wouldn't
go through-the kind you don't pay back," Thornberg said.
Detective William Frawley said the bullet did not enter
Flores but bounced right off his outer-clothing. "The coun-
tertop stopped it, thank God," Frawley said. He said Flores
would be released shortly from Metropolitan Hospital
where he was being treated for trauma.
Out the window

30 minutes later he was gone, Plattner said. The window,
his only escape route, was open. Lawyers Hubert Morrow
and Theodore Woods told the panel the judge once sum-
moned them to his chambers and told them he had had a
premonition that there would be a tragedy in the family of
one of the lawyers. Another lawyer, James Lapin, said
Lopez-Alexander once complained about vibrations in the
Dinver City and County building and urged him to feel the
wall. Martin Miller, a former district attorney, was hired
by the commission to investigate complaints filed against
Lopez-Alexander. He said that evidence he gathered will
show that the judge violate normal and reasonable standar-

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