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December 07, 1984 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-12-07

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4

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, December 7, 1984
'U' profs criticize U.S. foreign

policy

IN BRIEF.

By DAVID KLAPMAN
Eight University professors painted a not-too-
pretty picture of United States foreign policy in many
parts of the world yesterday at a forum on world
problems in Rackham Amphitheatre.
For example, the first two phases of the Reagan's
administration's foreign policy in the Middle East
have failed, Political Science Prof. Jerrold Green
told an audience of about 50 professors and students.
THE UNITED states viewed the Mid-East as a turf
to settle its own problems with the Soviet Union bet-
ween 1980-82 and ignored the region's problems,
Green said.
Likewise, the second phase of the Middle East
foreign policy - dubbed the "Reagan Initiative," -
aimed to balance the interests of both Israelis and
Palestinians. But this plan failed also after Israel
rejected it within 12 hours and Jordan'srKing Hussein
followed suit when it became clear Palestinian

Liberation Organizaton leader Yassar Arafat would
not allow Hussein to speak for the Palestinians.
Political Science Prof. Ali Mazrui also said that the
American government places too much emphasis on
Soviet presence in Africa. He pointed to constant
fears about Moammar Khadafy's dictatorship in
Libya and the presence of about 25,000 Cuban soldiers
in Angola.
U.S. fears about Soviet subversion are close to ap-
proaching "paranoia," said Alfred Meyer, a
professor of political science. Soviets are actually
''very cautious,"he added.
Meyer criticized both the United States and the
Soviet Union for zero-sum thinking - the political
theory that a success for one party must be compen-
sated by an equal loss by another. This mode of
defining foreign policy increases chances for nuclear
war and decreases the possibility of cooperation," he
told the audience.

Meyer
... our view toward USSR close to "paranoia"

Local schools can now halt busing programs

From The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-For the first time,
the Justice Department told a court
yesterday that a local school board can
abolish a court-ordered busing problem
and return to neighborhood schools
even if that increases racial
segregation at its schools.
The department filed a friend-of-the-
court brief in the 4th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals in a case involving Norfolk,
Va. But Assistant Attorney General
William Bradford Reynolds, head of the
department's civil rights division, said
the principles he was advancing could
effect "many, many other school
districts around the country."
IN THE BRIEF, Reynolds argued
that Norfolk had every right to halt the

court-ordered crosstown busing of
elementary students even though the
number of schools which are 90 percent
black will rise as a result from zero to
10.
If accepted by the courts, the com-
plex legal justification offered by
Reynolds would solve a major political
and legal problem he has faced since
taking office four years ago. Reynolds
moved swiftly to implement President
Reagan's opposition to the use of busing
to achieve school desegregation.
In doing so, he refused to have the
Justice Department support in-
tegration plans that required busing,
but that only affected new cases.
THE SUPREME COURT long ago

ruled that busing is a legal means of
ending school segregation and hun-
dreds of cities are operating under
court-approved busing orders. Until
yesterday, Reynolds had never advan-
ced a legal justification for junking
those court orders.
He argued that Norfolk was legally
entitled to end the busing system which
had been used to break down school
segregation and replace it with a
neighborhood system for two reasons:
First, he said, a court ruled nine
years ago that the busing system had
ended Norfolk's illegal dual schools,
system and replaced it with a unitary
system for both blacks and whites.
Since that declaration ended court

supervision of the system, he said Nor-
folk was free to implement any system
whose purpose was not discriminatory.
And he concluded that despite the in-
crease in school segregation the pur-
pose of the new Norfolk residential plan
was a legal effort to stem white flight
from the schools and to increase parent
involvement in schools.
"It is time in Norfolk-as in many,
many other school districts around the
country that have sustained for years
good faith compliance with court-
ordered desegregation plans-to
restore to the local authorities full
responsibility for running their public
schools," Reynolds said. "Our filing in
this case urges that result."

AN INVITATION YOU CANT REFUSE
TO THE MOVIE EVENT OF, THE YEAR
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Mackey may head U of Hawaii
HONOLULU-Outgoing Michigan State University President Cecil
Mackey and the University of Hawaii Board of Regents are working out final
contract details that would make Mackey the next UH president, the
Honolulu Advertiser reported yesterday.
There is an agreement in principle and only contract details need to be
worked out, the newspaper said, citing "board sources."
Mackey met with regents about a month ago in Honolulu and was im-
pressive, the newspaper said. If contract details are worked out, Mackey
would probably move to Hawaii in June.
The newspaper said University of Connecticut President John DiBiaggio
would take over as MSU president in July.
The search for a new UH president began early this year.
Death toll exceeds 2,000 in India
BHOPAL, India-The death toll in history's worst chemical disaster
passed 2,000 yesterday as hundreds of Indians who fled a choking cloud of
poisonous gas returned to their homes facing a future threatened by blin-
dness, kidney failure and liver disease.
"The worst is over," said a state official at Hamidia Hosital. which was
swamped with dead and injured after 25 tons of vaporized methyl isocyanate
spewed from a U.S-owned pesticide plant, engulfing the city and a 15-square mile
mile area early Monday.
Five members of a Union Carbide team-a doctor, two engineers, a
chemist, and an occupational health expert-flew on to Bhopal, a central In-
dian city of 900,000, to investigate Monday's leak of methyl isocyanate from
a 45-ton underground storage tank.
They were denied permission to enter the plant, which had been sealed to
prevent tampering with evidence about the leak, the United News of India
said.
Hijackers kill two Americans
BEIRUT, Lebanon-Five Arab gunmen threatened to kill every U.S. citizen
aboard a hijacked Kuwaiti airliner at Tehran airport yesterday and then
shot to death two more hostages, including the second American reported
killed. It was the worst case ever of cold-blooded hijack executions.
The killings brought to at least three the number of hostages slain in the
three-day showdown at Mehrabad Airport.
At least 56 hostages were roped to their seats aboard the Kuwaiti Airways
A-300 Airbus as the hijackers pressed their command that Kuwait free 21
people imprisoned for the bombings of U.S. and French facilities last
December.
The official Iranian news agency said one of the two passengers killed
Thursday was an American, reportedly the second U.S. citizen slain since
the plane was comandeered Tuesday. His body was riddled with six bullets.
McNamara breaks long silence
to defend Westmoreland
NEW YORK-Former Defense Secretary Robert McNamara yesterday
broke his long public silence about Vietnam to defend retired Gen. William
Westmoreland, the wartime commander accused by CBS of suppressing the
facts about enemy strength.
Testifying in Westmoreland's $120 million libel suit against the network
and three of its employees, NcNamara said he repeatedly warned CBS
producer George Crile in 1981 that the thesis of "The Uncounted Enemy: A
Vietnam Deception" was wrong.
"I kept repeating that I did not believe the data had been faked. I did not
believe the data had been suppressed. I did not believe Gen. Westmoreland
had conspired to deceive the president and me," McNamara said.
The CBS documentary, broadcast in January 1982, alleged that West-
moreland headed a 1967 "conspiracy" to suppress the news that communist
strength was much greater than had been believed and that it was still
growing. As a result, said CBS, President Lyndon Johnson and others in
Washington may have been taken by surprise when the communists laun-
ched their powerful Tet offensive in early 1968.
Mexico steps up peso devaluation
MEXICO CITY-The government yesterday increased the daily rate at
which the peso is devalued, in an attempt to promote tourism, make
Mexican goods more competitive abroad and slow the flow of dollars out of
the country.
The decision had long been expected despite the government's inter-
nationally praised efforts to bring the economy out of a serious tailspin.
It increases the daily slide of the peso to 17 centavos a day-less than one-
tenth of a U.S. cent-from the 13 centavo daily slide in effect for more than a
year.
A year from now, if the 17 centavo rate remains in effect, 266.02 pesos will
be worth $1. The rate yesterday was 204.97 pesas to the dollar.
The plan went into effect Thursday. It is the first change in the regulation
of the peso since September 1983, and is intended to boost exports, attract
tourists, and make goods on the Mexican side of the border more com-
petitive with those on the U.S. side.
The sliding, controlled scale also is aimed at averting a trauma like the
one triggered by three major devaluations that weakened the peso currency.
in 1982 when Mexico was plunged into its worst recession in half a century.

bhe fithgan. aa ly
Vol. XCV-No. 76
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Tuesday through Sunday
during the Fall and Winter terms and Tuesday through Saturday during the
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cate and College Press Service, and United Students Press Service.

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Line Producers Story by
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TRICTED O
7 REQUIRES ACCOMPANYING
ET OR ADULT GUARDIAN

Editor in Chief .................... BILL SPINDLE
Managing Editors.............. CHERYL BAACKE
NEIL CHASE
Associate News Editors .. ...... LAURIE DELATER
GEORGEA KOVANIS
THOMAS MILLER
Personnel Editor ..................... SUE BARTO
Opinion Page Editors..............JAMES BOYD
JACKIE YOUNG
NEWS STAFF: Laura Bischoff, Dov Cohen, Stephanie
DeGroote, Nancy Dolinko, Lily Eng, Rachel Gottlieb,
Thomas Hrach, Gregory Hutton, Bruce Jackson, Sean
Jackson, Vibeke Laroi, Carrie Levine, Jerry Markon,
Eric Mattson. Molly Melby, Tracey Miller, Kery Mur-
akami, Arona Pearlstein, Lisa Powers, Charles Sewell,
Stacey Shonk, Dan Swanson, Allison Zousmer.
Magazine Editor................JOSEPH KRAUS
Associate Magazine Editors .....PAULA DOHRING
JOHN LOGIE
Arts Editors.................FANNIE WEINSTEIN
PETE WILLIAMS
Associate Arts Editors ............ BYRON L. BULL
JEFF FROOMAN
DENNIS HARVEY
ANDY WEINE

Sports Editor .................... MIKE McGRAW
Associate Sports Editors ........... JEFF BERGIDA
KATIE BLACK WELL
PAUL HELGREN
DOUGLAS B. LEVY
STEVE WISE
SPORTS STAFF: Dave Aretha, Andy Arvidson, Mark
Borowsky, Emily Bridgham, Debbie deFrances, Joe
Devyak, Joe Ewing, Chris Gerbasi, Jim Gindin, Skip
Goodman, Jon Hartman, Steve Herz, Rick Kaplan,
Tom Keaney, Mark Kovinsky, Tim Makinen, Adam
Martin. Scott McKinlay, Barb McQuade, Scott Miller,
Brad Morgan, Jerry Muth, Phil Nussel, Adam Ochlis,
Mike Redstone, Scott Salowich, Randy Schwartz, Susan
Warner.
Business Manager..............STEVEN BLOOM
Advertising Manager...............LIZ CARSON
Display Manager............... KELLIE WORLEY
Nationals Manager . . JOE ORTIZ
Sales Manager ....... DEBBIE DIOGUARDI
Finance Manager..............LINDA KAFTAN
Marketing Manager..............KELLY SODEN
Classified Manager............ JANICE BOLOGNA
Ass't. Display Manager.........JEFFREY DOBEK
Ass't. Sales Manager...........LAURIE TRUSKE
Ass't. Finance Manager............ JANE CAPLAN
Asst. Classified Manager.........TERRENCE YEE
SALES REPRESENTATIVES: Ellen Abrahams, Sheryl
Beisman, Mark Bookman, Steve Casiani, Peter Gian-
greco, Seth Grossman, Mary Ann Hogan, Mark Stobbs,

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13th

8:00 p.m.

LORCH HALL I

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