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December 07, 1984 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Inside:

Holida

for

Do

A complete guide to the
season's bowl games

Ninety-five Years Gr h
of rincy
Editorial FreedomCloudy and windy with tem-
peratures reaching the mid-20s.
Vol. XCV, No. 76 Copyright 1984, The Michigan Daily Ann Arbor, Michigan - Friday, December 7, 1984 Fifteen Cents Sixteen Pages

Reagan,

Tutu

to discuss

foreign

policy

Ho ho ho Daily Photo by CAROL L. FRANCAVILLA
Mrs. Claus and Santa greet holiday shoppers and passers-by from the window of the University Flower Shop in Nickels Arcade.

From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON - President Reagan,
under pressure to re-evaluate ad-
ministration policy in South Africa, is
looking forward to today's meeting with
Nobel laureate Bishop Desmond Tutu, a
spokesman said yesterday.
Tutu, the Anglican bishop of South
Africa, has been in Washington this
week publicly condemning his gover-
nment's apartheid policy of racial
separation and the Reagan ad-
ministration's policy of using quiet per-
suasion instead of economic sanctions
to win human rights in the country.
"THE PRESIDENT looks forward to
meeting this distinguished South
African leader who has worked for
peaceful change in that country," said
spokesman Robert Sims.
"He wants also to make certain he is
able to give Bishop Tutu an accurate
understanding of our policy," Sims
said.
Reagan said recently that he found
apartheid "repugnant," and that Tutu
may not be "aware of all that we are
doing. We're trying very hard and very
quietly.".
REP. VIN WEBER, R-Minn., said
the Republicans want South Africa to
know that "in the future the emerging
generation of conservatives finds the
policy of apartheid as morally
repugnant as liberals do in South
Africa."
In response, Sims said the
congressmen "obviously feel strongly
that continuation of progress toward in-
ternal change in South Africa is an all

important issue ... and they represent
a key body of opinion in this country."
"In the past," Weber said, "Conser-
vatives have focuses solely on the
strategic value of South Africa and
have apologized or ignored the social
situation.
"I THINK this has encouraged South
Africa in its apartheid policy. We sort of
wanted to serve notice that is not" the
policy of the conservatives, Weber said.
Thirty-five conservative House
members, in a letter to South African
Ambassador Bernardus Fourie, have
vowed to seek diplomatic and economic
sanctions unless the white-ruled gover-
nment takes concrete steps to end apar-
theid.
Sen. Richard Lugar, R-Ind., was
joined by Nancy Kassebaum, R.-Kan.,
in writing a private letter to Reagan
late last week, asking him to look at
other options to the administration's
so-called "constructive engagement"
policy toward South Africa.
"CLEARLY I think we need to do
more than the 'constructive
engagement' idea," said Lugar, who
generally backs Reagan administration
policy and is in line to become chair-
man of the Foreign Relations panel in
the new Congress.
His comments came after a 20-
minute meeting with civil rights leader
the Rev. Jesse Jackson, and the senator
said he shared Jackson's sentiment
that U.S.-Africa relations are "going to
See REAGAN, Page 3

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Mechanical
heart and
lung kept
baby alive

By DOV COHEN
Baby Laura, a six-month-old heart
transplant patient, was kept alive for
three days after her operation at
University Hospital by a mechanical
heart and lung developed by a Univer-
sity professor.
"This was the first time a mechanical
heart was successfully used to support
a transplanted heart," said the inventor
of the device, medical school Prof.
Robert Bartlett, in a written statement
released yesterday.
"THIS IShistoric because it demon-"
strates that we now have back-up for a

transplanted heart during difficult
periods, much the way dialysis is
sometimes used to support kidney
patients," Bartless wrote.
The mechanical device can be used
for patients who experience rejection of
their transplanted organ at any time in
their lives, he added.
Doctors put Laura on the mechanical
heart and lung a day after her
Thanksgiving Day operation because
her new heart was having difficulty
pumping blood through her lungs. _
THREE DAYS later, the infant's
lungs and heart had "improved dram-

atically," according to Dr. Douglas
Behrendt, who led the team of doctors
that performed the operation.
On the fourth day the device was
removed and the baby's vital signs held
stable. Laura, who was born with a
misplaced aorta, remains in stable but
critical condition.
Bartlett's mechanical heart and lung
can be used for as long as two weeks,
outlasting the traditional heart-lung
machine which is safe for only six
hours. The device also "provides safer
control of clotting and better control of
blood flow," said a press release. "

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By MARLA GOLD
The dental school's minority recruiter will protest the ex-
pected elimination of his job to the school's budget priorities
committee in a special meeting this afternoon.
Lee Jones, a local dentist, was told recently that his part-
time job as an admissions counselor, minority recruiter, and
student adviser for the dental school will be eliminated in
August 1985 because of budget cuts. He has held the position
for 13 years.
TWO FACULTY members are expected to assume his
responsibilities in addition to their full-time teaching loads, a
plan Jones said may weaken the program.
"If you divide your attention between too many things,

something's going to suffer," he said.
Jones is skeptical that anyone else can give the job the
same close attention that he has. "It's a good program, so
why touch it? I'm doing a full-time job on part-time pay."
JONES SAID he works at the dental school from 2-6 p.m.
four days a week and often devotes entire weekends to
recruiting minority students both in-state and out-of-state.
"I have established good rapport with the students and
staff. Programs that provide well on campus need a strong
student advocate. I provide the support students need," he
added.
The decision to axe Jones' position has angered several
See MINORITY, Page 5

Dooley's
to close
or eight
daysfind
$1,900
By STACEY SHONK
Dooley's has been ordered to close for
eight days and has been fined $1,900 by
the State Liquor Control Commission
for the sale of alcohol to minors.
Dooley's was ordered to close from
Dec. 22 through 29 - a time when most
students will be out of town - after it
acknowledged 19 counts of serving
to minors in a trial last week.
DAVID CAMBELL, the ad-
ministrative law judge who heard the
case, called the offense "very serious,"
but would not comment on why those
specific dates were chosen.
The state liquor commission "will not
tolerate the sale of liquor to underage
individuals (and is) taking a hard line
in response to public sentiment against
the sale of liquor to minors and to drunk
driving," Cambell said.
A former waitress at Dooley's who
See DOOLEY'S, Page 5

Dioma scam to number 2,500

From the Associated Press
An FBI investigation of an Oregon
man accused of issuing counterfeit
diplomas from some 300 universities
could lead to the exposure of about
2,500 people who may be practicing
law or medicine or holding other jobs
under false pretenses.
The case against Dennis Everett
Gunter, 38, of Grants Pass, Ore., is the
sixth resulting from the FBI's 4-year-
old nationwide "Dipscam" in-
vestigation into phony diploma mills.
BUT GUNTER, scheduled for

arraignment in federal district court
in Eugene, Ore., Dec. 19, is the first
accused of selling bogus degrees from
actual universities and colleges. The
five earlier cases involved fictitious
schools issuing phony degrees and
college transcripts.
According to a seven-page indic-
tment handed up last August, Gunter
charged customers from $39.95 to
$64.95 for counterfeit diplomas and
degrees from schools including Har-
vard, Penn State, Universty of North
Carolina in Chapel Hill, North

Carolina State, the University of
Michigan, Michigan State University
and the University of Colorado.
Gunter is also accused of furnishing
phony certificates from the American
Society of Clinical .Pathologists and
countefeit Bronze Star medals from
the U.S. Marine Corps.
U.S. Attorney Tom Coffin of Eugene
told The Associated Press that "it's
possible" the names of purchasers of
phony diplomas might be entered into
evidence in the coming weeks,

Daily Photo by CAROL L. FRANCAVILLA
Dooley's will be closed for eight days during the holiday season after the
State Liquor Control Commission found them guilty of 19 counts of serving
minors.

TODAY
Christmas under a reindeer?
" N randma Got Run Over By a Reindeer," an

The 5-year-old song, recorded by a duo called Elmo and
Patsy with lyrics by San Franciscan Randy Brooks is bea-_
ting the late Bing Crosby's "White Christmas" for the
second straight year. Crosby's "White Christmas" remain-
s popular and is the all-time Christmas hit with 38 million
copies sold. But last year, in the final week of the vuletide
season, "Grandma.. ." took over the top spot in Billboard
Magazine's charts, and is still running strong. "It's hard to
believe this might be the new Christmas song," Billboard
spokesman George Finley said Wednesday in New York.
Finley said the song's success comes from its novelty.
"People are always looking for novelty stuff," he said. The
record "nrobably anneal to vonnn neonle who are not en-

freshly fallen snow and makes the first footprints. The oil
painting, titled "Christmas Morning at the White House,"
marks the second time the Reagans have used a Wyeth
painting for their Christmas card. Inside the card, in gold
enraved script, is the message: "The President and Mrs.
Reagan extend to you their warmest holiday greetings and
best wishes for a new year. A White House statement said
the cards were printed by Hallmark at cost, and th'at. the
Republican National Committee paid for printing and
mailing expenses. The cards will go into the mail beginning
on December 12.

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